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RE: [hobbicast] Where did everyone go

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  • Kevin Tucker
    Malcom, and to the rest that contributed to my request for information thank you. However I m trying to find someone in the South Carolina area who has a
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 28, 2006
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      Malcom, and to the rest that contributed to my request for information thank you. However I'm trying to find someone in the South Carolina area who has a relativly small induction (or Gas) furnace that will take a charge of around 15lbs.

      I know it work because I've done this processin the UK. I'm trying to melt a mixture of High Grade Aluminium (UK Spelling, don't hold it against me because I'm british), and a Ni/Co alloy turnings.

      Tall order I know. I work for a laboratory in SC that carries out chemical analysis in the US on metal products. We are not metallurgists in the true sense of the work.

      If anyone can point me in the right directs it would be very welcome.

      Regards

      Mattemanuk



      Malcolm Parker-Lisberg <mparkerlisberg@...> wrote:
      There have been communications on the other casting
      group about putting charcoal in the crucible to give a
      reducing atmosphere, hence no oxygen, no oxide, it may
      be worth a try when melting cans to see if the metal
      to oxide ratio can be improved.



      --- Dan Brewer wrote:

      > Soda cans are almost pure Al. They are formulated
      > fro deep drawing not
      > casting. The amount of surface to amount of al is
      > high. As soon as AL is
      > exposed to air it oxidizes. AL Oxide melts at a much
      > higher temp than AL.
      > So you end up with a 50% waste factor.
      > DAN in Auburn
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      > Of Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom
      > Sent: Monday, February 27, 2006 4:45 PM
      > To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Where did everyone go
      >
      > On 02/28 12:41 , weehaaa2002 wrote:
      > > I have been away for awhile I can't believe the
      > difference in this list.
      > > Where did everyone go? HELLO........... Still a
      > wonderful resource for
      > > information but a bit lonely.
      >
      > we're all off doing other things. :)
      >
      > to throw out a topic for discussion...
      >
      > I've heard that aluminum pop/beer cans are poor
      > scrap metal for casting. why
      > is this? is it just that it's a poor grade of
      > aluminum, or that the cans are
      > hard to work with?
      >
      > --
      > Carl Soderstrom
      >
      > "A strong conviction that something must be done
      > is the parent of many bad measures"
      > --Daniel Webster
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • Jeshua Lacock
      ... Greetings, Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal oxidization loss, with a little care. The trick with cans is to start with a pool of
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 5, 2006
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        On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:

        >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
        >
        > ah. I understand now.
        > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to me. Oh
        > well,
        > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these decades... :)

        Greetings,

        Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal oxidization
        loss, with a little care.

        The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum (not
        from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the entire
        can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.

        There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is the
        plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.

        And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental quality
        official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning garbage
        and is illegal.

        At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you have
        them still...


        Cheers,

        Jeshua Lacock, Owner
        <http://OpenOSX.com>
        phone: 877.240.1364
      • Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom
        ... I kind of figured something like this would work. I ve certainly melted down a large pile of lead wheelweights like this. (On a side note, it s kind of
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 6, 2006
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          On 03/05 09:32 , Jeshua Lacock wrote:
          > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum (not
          > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the entire
          > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
          >
          > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is the
          > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.

          I kind of figured something like this would work. I've certainly melted down
          a large pile of lead wheelweights like this. (On a side note, it's kind of
          wierd to see how well rubber valve stems float on a puddle of molten lead...
          and don't burn instantly to cinders).

          --
          Carl Soderstrom

          Sometimes it is said that man cannot be trusted with the government of
          himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others?
          --Thomas Jefferson
        • Ray
          First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation. Having made some ingots with the
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 7, 2006
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            First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can
            crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.

            Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
            remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper (e.g.
            pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
            silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
            tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and aids
            in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
            aircraft aluminum 2218.

            Ray (Perth Australia).


            --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
            >
            > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
            > >
            > > ah. I understand now.
            > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to me.
            Oh
            > > well,
            > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
            decades... :)
            >
            > Greetings,
            >
            > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
            oxidization
            > loss, with a little care.
            >
            > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum
            (not
            > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the
            entire
            > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
            >
            > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is the
            > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
            >
            > And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental
            quality
            > official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning
            garbage
            > and is illegal.
            >
            > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you
            have
            > them still...
            >
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
            > <http://OpenOSX.com>
            > phone: 877.240.1364
            >
          • Ray
            First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation. Having made some ingots with the
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 7, 2006
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              First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can
              crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.

              Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
              remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper (e.g.
              pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
              silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
              tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and aids
              in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
              aircraft aluminum 2218.

              Ray (Perth Australia).


              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
              >
              > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
              > >
              > > ah. I understand now.
              > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to me.
              Oh
              > > well,
              > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
              decades... :)
              >
              > Greetings,
              >
              > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
              oxidization
              > loss, with a little care.
              >
              > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum
              (not
              > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the
              entire
              > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
              >
              > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is the
              > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
              >
              > And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental
              quality
              > official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning
              garbage
              > and is illegal.
              >
              > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you
              have
              > them still...
              >
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
              > <http://OpenOSX.com>
              > phone: 877.240.1364
              >
            • Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom
              ... ok. That s much the same sort of thing I had in mind at first... glad to know someone has had success with it. :) -- Carl Soderstrom If you wish to
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 8, 2006
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                On 03/08 04:37 , Ray wrote:
                > First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can
                > crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.
                >
                > Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
                > remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper (e.g.
                > pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
                > silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
                > tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and aids
                > in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
                > aircraft aluminum 2218.

                ok.
                That's much the same sort of thing I had in mind at first... glad to know
                someone has had success with it. :)

                --
                Carl Soderstrom

                "If you wish to prosper, let your customer prosper. When people have
                learned this lesson, everyone will seek his individual welfare in the
                general welfare. Then jealousies between man and man, city and city,
                province and province, nation and nation, will no longer trouble the
                world."
                Frederick Bastiat
              • Chris Horne
                Ray, thats very interesting.. I have added copper to my canium but not considered glass to add silicon. How much glass would you add per Kilo? I have a
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 8, 2006
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                  Ray,
                  thats very interesting..

                  I have added copper to my 'canium' but not considered glass to add
                  silicon.

                  How much glass would you add per Kilo?

                  I have a pneumatic cylinder rigged up to crush the cans into lumps
                  that will fit in the crucible and I also add a flux made from 50%
                  sodium chloride and 50% potassium chloride.
                  The other precautions I take are to melt some ingot into the crucible
                  first and then melt the cans with a slightly reducing flame.
                  I'm not sure which of these has the greatest effect but together they
                  made a big difference, from nearly 50% dross down to about 25% dross
                  by weight and far less dissoved hydrogen in the melt.

                  Chris

                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <pemby200@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a can
                  > crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.
                  >
                  > Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
                  > remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper (e.g.
                  > pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
                  > silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
                  > tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and aids
                  > in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
                  > aircraft aluminum 2218.
                  >
                  > Ray (Perth Australia).
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
                  > > >
                  > > > ah. I understand now.
                  > > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to me.
                  > Oh
                  > > > well,
                  > > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
                  > decades... :)
                  > >
                  > > Greetings,
                  > >
                  > > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
                  > oxidization
                  > > loss, with a little care.
                  > >
                  > > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum
                  > (not
                  > > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the
                  > entire
                  > > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
                  > >
                  > > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is the
                  > > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
                  > >
                  > > And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental
                  > quality
                  > > official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning
                  > garbage
                  > > and is illegal.
                  > >
                  > > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you
                  > have
                  > > them still...
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Cheers,
                  > >
                  > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                  > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                  > > phone: 877.240.1364
                  > >
                  >
                • Lyle
                  Why do you need flux? LL ... crucible ... they ... can ... (e.g. ... aids ... me. ... the
                  Message 8 of 18 , Mar 9, 2006
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                    Why do you need flux?
                    LL
                    --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Horne" <chris@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ray,
                    > thats very interesting..
                    >
                    > I have added copper to my 'canium' but not considered glass to add
                    > silicon.
                    >
                    > How much glass would you add per Kilo?
                    >
                    > I have a pneumatic cylinder rigged up to crush the cans into lumps
                    > that will fit in the crucible and I also add a flux made from 50%
                    > sodium chloride and 50% potassium chloride.
                    > The other precautions I take are to melt some ingot into the
                    crucible
                    > first and then melt the cans with a slightly reducing flame.
                    > I'm not sure which of these has the greatest effect but together
                    they
                    > made a big difference, from nearly 50% dross down to about 25% dross
                    > by weight and far less dissoved hydrogen in the melt.
                    >
                    > Chris
                    >
                    > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <pemby200@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a
                    can
                    > > crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.
                    > >
                    > > Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
                    > > remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper
                    (e.g.
                    > > pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
                    > > silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
                    > > tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and
                    aids
                    > > in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
                    > > aircraft aluminum 2218.
                    > >
                    > > Ray (Perth Australia).
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > ah. I understand now.
                    > > > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to
                    me.
                    > > Oh
                    > > > > well,
                    > > > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
                    > > decades... :)
                    > > >
                    > > > Greetings,
                    > > >
                    > > > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
                    > > oxidization
                    > > > loss, with a little care.
                    > > >
                    > > > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum
                    > > (not
                    > > > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the
                    > > entire
                    > > > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
                    > > >
                    > > > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is
                    the
                    > > > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
                    > > >
                    > > > And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental
                    > > quality
                    > > > official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning
                    > > garbage
                    > > > and is illegal.
                    > > >
                    > > > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you
                    > > have
                    > > > them still...
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Cheers,
                    > > >
                    > > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                    > > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                    > > > phone: 877.240.1364
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Chris Horne
                    Lyle I don t know that it s needed, but it seems to help the dross seperate from the metal. Without it, there is more dross which visibly has more metal in it.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Mar 9, 2006
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                      Lyle

                      I don't know that it's needed,
                      but it seems to help the dross seperate from the metal.
                      Without it, there is more dross which visibly has more metal in it.

                      Chris (-=Spiyda=-)

                      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle" <creepinogie@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Why do you need flux?
                      > LL
                      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Horne" <chris@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Ray,
                      > > thats very interesting..
                      > >
                      > > I have added copper to my 'canium' but not considered glass to add
                      > > silicon.
                      > >
                      > > How much glass would you add per Kilo?
                      > >
                      > > I have a pneumatic cylinder rigged up to crush the cans into lumps
                      > > that will fit in the crucible and I also add a flux made from 50%
                      > > sodium chloride and 50% potassium chloride.
                      > > The other precautions I take are to melt some ingot into the
                      > crucible
                      > > first and then melt the cans with a slightly reducing flame.
                      > > I'm not sure which of these has the greatest effect but together
                      > they
                      > > made a big difference, from nearly 50% dross down to about 25% dross
                      > > by weight and far less dissoved hydrogen in the melt.
                      > >
                      > > Chris
                      > >
                      > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <pemby200@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with a
                      > can
                      > > > crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.
                      > > >
                      > > > Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin trays),
                      > > > remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm copper
                      > (e.g.
                      > > > pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy with
                      > > > silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
                      > > > tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy and
                      > aids
                      > > > in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something like
                      > > > aircraft aluminum 2218.
                      > > >
                      > > > Ray (Perth Australia).
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > ah. I understand now.
                      > > > > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available to
                      > me.
                      > > > Oh
                      > > > > > well,
                      > > > > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
                      > > > decades... :)
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Greetings,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
                      > > > oxidization
                      > > > > loss, with a little care.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten aluminum
                      > > > (not
                      > > > > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse the
                      > > > entire
                      > > > > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part is
                      > the
                      > > > > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > And be warned, according to the Department of Environmental
                      > > > quality
                      > > > > official that visited me, melting cans is considered burning
                      > > > garbage
                      > > > > and is illegal.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if you
                      > > > have
                      > > > > them still...
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Cheers,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                      > > > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                      > > > > phone: 877.240.1364
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Ray
                      -Chris, I have a charcoal furnace (although I have been using BBQ briquettes up till now). Recently, I bought a different brand of BBQ fuel (Red Head from
                      Message 10 of 18 , Mar 9, 2006
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                        -Chris,

                        I have a charcoal furnace (although I have been using BBQ briquettes
                        up till now). Recently, I bought a different brand of BBQ fuel (Red
                        Head from Shell garages in Australia) and found that it is charcoal -
                        extruded in some way into chunks like big chook food pellets.

                        This seems to burn much hotter and cleaner and I have read somewhere
                        that charcoal has a reducing flame which can inhibit the oxidation
                        (and hence the amount of dross). As aluminium (and brass) doesn't
                        react with charcoal, apparently you can even add small lumps into
                        the crucible to enhance the reducing atmosphere.

                        As I am melting up again tonight, I intend to give that a go as the
                        cans produce a fair heap of c..p that is hard to get out of the
                        crucible.

                        Ray
                        Perth Weatern Australia


                        -- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Horne" <chris@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Lyle
                        >
                        > I don't know that it's needed,
                        > but it seems to help the dross seperate from the metal.
                        > Without it, there is more dross which visibly has more metal in it.
                        >
                        > Chris (-=Spiyda=-)
                        >
                        > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle" <creepinogie@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Why do you need flux?
                        > > LL
                        > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Horne" <chris@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Ray,
                        > > > thats very interesting..
                        > > >
                        > > > I have added copper to my 'canium' but not considered glass to
                        add
                        > > > silicon.
                        > > >
                        > > > How much glass would you add per Kilo?
                        > > >
                        > > > I have a pneumatic cylinder rigged up to crush the cans into
                        lumps
                        > > > that will fit in the crucible and I also add a flux made from
                        50%
                        > > > sodium chloride and 50% potassium chloride.
                        > > > The other precautions I take are to melt some ingot into the
                        > > crucible
                        > > > first and then melt the cans with a slightly reducing flame.
                        > > > I'm not sure which of these has the greatest effect but
                        together
                        > > they
                        > > > made a big difference, from nearly 50% dross down to about 25%
                        dross
                        > > > by weight and far less dissoved hydrogen in the melt.
                        > > >
                        > > > Chris
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <pemby200@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > First off, bash the cans (when dry) as flat as possible with
                        a
                        > > can
                        > > > > crusher and/or hammer. This reduces surface oxidation.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Having made some ingots with the molten cans (ie. muffin
                        trays),
                        > > > > remelt with some broken (clear?) glass and about 45 gm
                        copper
                        > > (e.g.
                        > > > > pipe) for each kilogram of aluminum. This produces an alloy
                        with
                        > > > > silicon (which improves mold flow), magnesium (which reduces
                        > > > > tarnishing) and 4% or so of copper which improves the alloy
                        and
                        > > aids
                        > > > > in machining. A bit of tin etc and you would have something
                        like
                        > > > > aircraft aluminum 2218.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Ray (Perth Australia).
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Jeshua Lacock <jeshua@>
                        wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > On Feb 27, 2006, at 7:30 PM, Carl Wilhelm Soderstrom wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > >> Melting Al cans is a waste of time and energy.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > ah. I understand now.
                        > > > > > > too bad, since I have several truckloads worth available
                        to
                        > > me.
                        > > > > Oh
                        > > > > > > well,
                        > > > > > > just have to take them down to the recycler one of these
                        > > > > decades... :)
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Greetings,
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Actually, you can get good quality Aluminum, with minimal
                        > > > > oxidization
                        > > > > > loss, with a little care.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > The trick with cans is to start with a pool of molten
                        aluminum
                        > > > > (not
                        > > > > > from cans ideally). Then you can instantaneously immerse
                        the
                        > > > > entire
                        > > > > > can; mostly eliminating the surface area exposed to oxygen.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > There is garbage on the cans, obviously. The nastiest part
                        is
                        > > the
                        > > > > > plastic liner, and the paint is not great either.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > And be warned, according to the Department of
                        Environmental
                        > > > > quality
                        > > > > > official that visited me, melting cans is considered
                        burning
                        > > > > garbage
                        > > > > > and is illegal.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > At any rate I wish I had a truck full of cans! Email me if
                        you
                        > > > > have
                        > > > > > them still...
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Cheers,
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Jeshua Lacock, Owner
                        > > > > > <http://OpenOSX.com>
                        > > > > > phone: 877.240.1364
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
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