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RE: [hobbicast] Re: new guy couple questions

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  • Dan Brewer
    Most of Europe was denuded by the process of converting wood into charcoal to make iron. Coal is a substitute for charcoal. Coal must be coaked before using.
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 13, 2005
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      Most of Europe was denuded by the process of converting wood into charcoal
      to make iron. Coal is a substitute for charcoal. Coal must be coaked
      before using. This is a process much like making charcoal out of wood. But
      since it takes a lot of fuel to do this propane or electricity (carbon Arc)
      is a better thing to use.
      Dan in Auburn

      -----Original Message-----
      From: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hobbicast@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of John
      Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 3:36 PM
      To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [hobbicast] Re: new guy couple questions

      Yup, melting steel with charcoal might be a bit tough. Maybe you
      should move back to the bronze age for your weapons..
      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jwb38_1999@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I have melted successfully with charcoal and wood. Go back through
      my
      > old posts and you can read about it.
      >
      > John
      >
      > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "artic_knight31337"
      > <artic_knight31337@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > so im wanting either a charcoal or arc furnace (home made by me)
      for
      > > custom steels (aspiring swordsmith). so far ive heard a few
      formulas
      > > for the foundry? or furnace part and one or two for the crucible
      > > unfortunately i think the crucibles are for aluminium. my
      preference
      > > is charcoal but by what ive read so far it will be very
      difficult to
      > > get the crucible hot enough. ive heard of degassing altho i know
      > > nothing of it and im aware that if molten steel touches anything
      wet
      > > theres an explosion of sorts.
      > >
      > > is there a site where i can fill in the blanks? or is there a
      nice guy
      > > around that doesnt mind?
      > >
      >








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    • greywynd
      ... There are a lot of guys on here with a lot more knowledge about the casting and furnace stuff than I, but I m herre to learn as I m hoping to maybe build a
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 13, 2005
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        --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "artic_knight31337"
        <artic_knight31337@y...> wrote:
        >
        > and im aware that if molten steel touches anything wet
        > theres an explosion of sorts.
        >


        There are a lot of guys on here with a lot more knowledge about the
        casting and furnace stuff than I, but I'm herre to learn as I'm hoping
        to maybe build a furnace this winter myself.

        As far as the 'explosion'....this is a bit of a 'stray' issue that is
        a bit of a pet peeve. I work in a zinc and mag diecasting plant, and a
        lot of people have this belief that it will 'explode' if water comes
        into contact with the molten metal. Not true. (well, magnesium is a
        different story, but, because of chemical reactions, not because of
        the heat.) If done right, I can take and wash a part of the diecast
        machine down with a molten pot of zinc, with water splashing onto it,
        with no problem, just lots of steam.

        The situation that you have to avoid is this, is if the water somehow
        gets UNDER the surface of the metal. It 'superheats' so fast, and with
        such force, it will force metal up and out, more or less like an
        'explosion' occuring, hence why so many people say it explodes. This
        is where good foundry practice comes into play. Make sure your metal
        is clean, and dry. PREHEAT it!!! This helps to remove the moisture.
        Using parts/pieces that are 'sandwiched' together? Not a good idea,
        moisture can be trapped in the joints. One of our maintenance guys had
        a meltpot burp when he did just that, fortunately, he had a couple
        relatively minor burns, and that was about it.

        This is one of the areas that I hope everyone does lots of research in
        before 'melting metal'...it's well worth the time. There are lots of
        things to consider. Type of clothing, and type of material of the
        clothing. Face/eye protection. Hand and foot protection. Think about
        the area that you are pouring in. Concrete floors are nice, hard,
        safe...right? Ever seen one pop or 'explode' when enough heat turns
        the moisture in the concrete to steam? (Concrete is good, if certain
        factors are considered. It also depends on the material that you're
        melting.)

        Hopefully someone can link us to a good spot or book on safety in the
        foundry so that it's a ready reference for those that need it, and for
        a reminder for some that have been at this for a while. (Safety never
        hurts to brush up on guys!!)
      • Chele Bamboo
        see bottom ========= ... There are a lot of guys on here with a lot more knowledge about the casting and furnace stuff than I, but I m herre to learn as I m
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 14, 2005
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          see bottom
          =========

          greywynd <greywynd@...> wrote:

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "artic_knight31337"
          wrote:
          >
          > and im aware that if molten steel touches anything wet
          > theres an explosion of sorts.
          >


          There are a lot of guys on here with a lot more knowledge about the
          casting and furnace stuff than I, but I'm herre to learn as I'm hoping
          to maybe build a furnace this winter myself.

          As far as the 'explosion'....this is a bit of a 'stray' issue that is
          a bit of a pet peeve. I work in a zinc and mag diecasting plant, and a
          lot of people have this belief that it will 'explode' if water comes
          into contact with the molten metal. Not true. (well, magnesium is a
          different story, but, because of chemical reactions, not because of
          the heat.) If done right, I can take and wash a part of the diecast
          machine down with a molten pot of zinc, with water splashing onto it,
          with no problem, just lots of steam.

          The situation that you have to avoid is this, is if the water somehow
          gets UNDER the surface of the metal. It 'superheats' so fast, and with
          such force, it will force metal up and out, more or less like an
          'explosion' occuring, hence why so many people say it explodes. This
          is where good foundry practice comes into play. Make sure your metal
          is clean, and dry. PREHEAT it!!! This helps to remove the moisture.
          Using parts/pieces that are 'sandwiched' together? Not a good idea,
          moisture can be trapped in the joints. One of our maintenance guys had
          a meltpot burp when he did just that, fortunately, he had a couple
          relatively minor burns, and that was about it.

          This is one of the areas that I hope everyone does lots of research in
          before 'melting metal'...it's well worth the time. There are lots of
          things to consider. Type of clothing, and type of material of the
          clothing. Face/eye protection. Hand and foot protection. Think about
          the area that you are pouring in. Concrete floors are nice, hard,
          safe...right? Ever seen one pop or 'explode' when enough heat turns
          the moisture in the concrete to steam? (Concrete is good, if certain
          factors are considered. It also depends on the material that you're
          melting.)

          Hopefully someone can link us to a good spot or book on safety in the
          foundry so that it's a ready reference for those that need it, and for
          a reminder for some that have been at this for a while. (Safety never
          hurts to brush up on guys!!)

          a great post and i learned something..i agree safty imho is a # 1 issue with me..i want to live a long and healthy life..as i only have this one old body..id love to know more on safty issues..just like working with power tools/eqt it only takes a nana second to screw up and it does not phase a machine to eat you up.



          and you work with zinc,a metal i worry alot about seeing its killed many working with it wrongly




          Thank you -Michele (Chele) - Owner of:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mokume_gane
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pattern_welded_knives
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/homefoundry_and_casting















































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