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Re: [hobbicast] snap flask question

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  • Raymond Heckert
    In the foundry where I worked, long years ago, we used to put weights on top of the greensand molds. The weights were equal to or greater than the weight of
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 8, 2005
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      In the foundry where I worked, long years ago, we used to put weights on top
      of the greensand molds. The weights were equal to or greater than the
      weight of the metal being poured into the mold... and we still had a
      'run-out' problem occasionally. Best wear pouring chaps or leggings. I
      s'pect that the 3rd hinge wouldn't work. You'd be better off 'splitting'
      the halves apart, and putting them back together in an L-L configuration for
      storage. But, I don't think you'll save much room.

      RayHex

      -----Original Message-----


      Date: Monday, August 08, 2005 6:20 PM
      Subject: [hobbicast] snap flask question


      >I was thinking about building a snap flask so I would only have one or
      >two flasks taking up space in the garage. My concern is when you
      >remove the flask and pour the metal that it will create enough
      >pressure to seperate the sand mold. And, could a snap flask be made
      >with three hinges so it could be laid flat when in storage?
    • Eric Poulsen
      Ah, so the weights are on the sand as well as the frame?
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 9, 2005
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        Ah, so the weights are on the sand as well as the frame?

        Lyle wrote:

        >Because iron and brass will push the sand up out of the cope in some
        >cases. I used to go nuts pouring belt buckles about 4 to 6 of them
        >per flask, I could latch the cope and drag and still get a misspour.
        >Not all the time but often enough that I was ruining my wooden (at
        >the time) flasks. it was not until I started using old lengths of RR
        >track for weight (which helped keep the sand pushed down) that my
        >problem ended. Latches work good for any pattern that needs a double
        >roll so the flask won't split as you roll it but that's about it.
        >LL
        >
        >--- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Eric Poulsen <eric@z...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >>What I always wondered is why people use weights at all? Seems
        >>
        >>
        >obvious
        >
        >
        >>that you can simply put toggle latches to snap the cope to the drag.
        >>
        >>Toggle latches:
        >>
        >>http://images.google.com/images?q=toggle%
        >>
        >>
        >20latch&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&safe=off&sa=N&tab=wi
        >
        >
        >>c_reynolds2571 wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>>I was thinking about building a snap flask so I would only have
        >>>
        >>>
        >one or
        >
        >
        >>>two flasks taking up space in the garage. My concern is when you
        >>>remove the flask and pour the metal that it will create enough
        >>>pressure to seperate the sand mold. And, could a snap flask be made
        >>>with three hinges so it could be laid flat when in storage?
        >>>
        >>>Chris
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        >>>this list does not accept attachments.
        >>>
        >>>Files area and list services are at:
        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        >>>
        >>>For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        >>>check out these two affiliated sites:
        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        >>>
        >>>Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        >>>http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        >>>
        >>>List Owner:
        >>>owly@t...
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>Yahoo! Groups Links
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
        >this list does not accept attachments.
        >
        >Files area and list services are at:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
        >
        >For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
        >check out these two affiliated sites:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
        >
        >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
        >
        >List Owner:
        >owly@...
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Lyle
        Yes, It s important to distribute the weight over the sand. Commecial sap weights have a notch on either end (or hole in the middle) where you can pour
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 9, 2005
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          Yes,
          It's important to distribute the weight over the sand. Commecial sap
          weights have a notch on either end (or hole in the middle) where you
          can pour through. You don't have to have a weight covering all the
          sand, just across the top of the flask. Still suporting the weight on
          the edges of the cope. The bottom of the sap weight is flat up
          against the sand. I hardly ever use them for aluminum but always for
          brass. I have a couple of commercial ones but mostly use of 6" to 1'
          sections of RR track but you need to leave enough clearance to keep
          the pouring spout on the crucible close to the sprue.
          LL

          -- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Eric Poulsen <eric@z...> wrote:
          > Ah, so the weights are on the sand as well as the frame?
          >
          > Lyle wrote:
          >
          > >Because iron and brass will push the sand up out of the cope in
          some
          > >cases. I used to go nuts pouring belt buckles about 4 to 6 of them
          > >per flask, I could latch the cope and drag and still get a
          misspour.
          > >Not all the time but often enough that I was ruining my wooden (at
          > >the time) flasks. it was not until I started using old lengths of
          RR
          > >track for weight (which helped keep the sand pushed down) that my
          > >problem ended. Latches work good for any pattern that needs a
          double
          > >roll so the flask won't split as you roll it but that's about it.
          > >LL
          > >
          > >--- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Eric Poulsen <eric@z...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >>What I always wondered is why people use weights at all? Seems
          > >>
          > >>
          > >obvious
          > >
          > >
          > >>that you can simply put toggle latches to snap the cope to the
          drag.
          > >>
          > >>Toggle latches:
          > >>
          > >>http://images.google.com/images?q=toggle%
          > >>
          > >>
          > >20latch&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&safe=off&sa=N&tab=wi
          > >
          > >
          > >>c_reynolds2571 wrote:
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>>I was thinking about building a snap flask so I would only have
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >one or
          > >
          > >
          > >>>two flasks taking up space in the garage. My concern is when you
          > >>>remove the flask and pour the metal that it will create enough
          > >>>pressure to seperate the sand mold. And, could a snap flask be
          made
          > >>>with three hinges so it could be laid flat when in storage?
          > >>>
          > >>>Chris
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
          > >>>this list does not accept attachments.
          > >>>
          > >>>Files area and list services are at:
          > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
          > >>>
          > >>>For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
          > >>>check out these two affiliated sites:
          > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
          > >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
          > >>>
          > >>>Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > >>>http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          > >>>
          > >>>List Owner:
          > >>>owly@t...
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
          > >this list does not accept attachments.
          > >
          > >Files area and list services are at:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
          > >
          > >For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
          > >check out these two affiliated sites:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
          > >
          > >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
          > >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
          > >
          > >List Owner:
          > >owly@t...
          > >
          > >
          > >Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
        • Bob Sipes
          Eric, one of the reasons to use a snap flask is so you can use one flask to ram multiple molds. You normally would sit the rammed flask and sand on a suitable
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 9, 2005
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            Eric, one of the reasons to use a snap flask is so you can use one flask
            to ram multiple molds. You normally would sit the rammed flask and sand on
            a suitable flat surface and remove the flask from the completed but
            unpoured sand mold. You would then use the same flask to ram another mold
            using the same flask. With the flask removed, there is no sides to latch
            together so weights must be used to keep the cope from floating.
            I have had no problems using weights to keep the cope from floating as
            long as you don't crush the unprotected mold with the weight.

            Bob Sipes






            Ah, so the weights are on the sand as well as the frame?

            Lyle wrote:

            >Because iron and brass will push the sand up out of the cope in some
            >cases. I used to go nuts pouring belt buckles about 4 to 6 of them
            >per flask, I could latch the cope and drag and still get a misspour.
            >Not all the time but often enough that I was ruining my wooden (at
            >the time) flasks. it was not until I started using old lengths of RR
            >track for weight (which helped keep the sand pushed down) that my
            >problem ended. Latches work good for any pattern that needs a double
            >roll so the flask won't split as you roll it but that's about it.
            >LL
            >
            >--- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, Eric Poulsen <eric@z...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >What I always wondered is why people use weights at all? Seems
            >obvious that you can simply put toggle latches to snap the cope to the
            drag.







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dick Morris
            Here s some good information including a single hinge snap flask from former (I think) list member Ray Brandes. http://www.ray-vin.com/frfoundry.htm
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 9, 2005
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              Here's some good information including a single hinge snap flask from
              former (I think) list member Ray Brandes.

              http://www.ray-vin.com/frfoundry.htm

              At 09:03 AM 8/9/2005, you wrote:
              > And, could a snap flask be made
              > > with three hinges so it could be laid flat when in storage?
              > >
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