Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

phos bronze scrap melt

Expand Messages
  • capebyron2003
    Hello, a friend has asked me to melt about 10 kg of scrap and swarf phos bronze into machinable billets.I haven t melted this alloy before.Anything specific I
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 18, 2004
      Hello,
      a friend has asked me to melt about 10 kg of scrap and swarf phos
      bronze into machinable billets.I haven't melted this alloy
      before.Anything specific I need to know ? Flux,degassing,do I need to
      add new ingot to the melt?
      regards,
      Peter Sibley
    • danielbrewer2004
      Start with a small pieces of material and a teaspoon of crushed food grade glass. Preheat the material and try to push it into the pool of metal on the bottom
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 18, 2004
        Start with a small pieces of material and a teaspoon of crushed food grade
        glass. Preheat the material and try to push it into the pool of metal on the
        bottom of the crucible. Keep upwind on the exhaust as the fumes are real
        nasty. Try not to over heat the metal as the zinc will burn off. Stir the
        mix just before pouring. Scrape off the dross and pour into you ingot
        forms. Expect about 1/3 loss in dross, more if the metal is dirty.

        Have fun
        Dan in Auburn

        -----Original Message-----
        From: capebyron2003 [mailto:sibleyp@...]
        Sent: Monday, October 18, 2004 6:33 PM
        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [hobbicast] phos bronze scrap melt




        Hello,
        a friend has asked me to melt about 10 kg of scrap and swarf phos
        bronze into machinable billets.I haven't melted this alloy
        before.Anything specific I need to know ? Flux,degassing,do I need to
        add new ingot to the melt?
        regards,
        Peter Sibley





        This list is for discussion of metal casting
        and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share
        photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to:
        sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
        Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
        http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

        Files area and list services are at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast For problems that cannot be
        otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
        owly@...


        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Aaron Toney
        I am trying to track down at about what temperature molten AL 6061 starts to glow visibly orange. Does anyone know of a good resource for this type of
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 19, 2004
          I am trying to track down at about what temperature molten AL 6061
          starts to glow visibly orange. Does anyone know of a good resource for
          this type of information. I am saving up for a pyrometer but it is going
          to be a while.

          Any help would be appreciated.

          Thanks, Aaron
        • giesser@aol.com
          The Orange Glow in liquid Aluminum starts at about 1400 to 1450°F. If it has a pink color, it is about 1350 to 1400. There is no reason to ever heat liquid
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 19, 2004
            The Orange Glow in liquid Aluminum starts at about 1400 to 1450°F. If it has a pink color, it is about 1350 to 1400. There is no reason to ever heat liquid Aluminum to a temperature higher than 1450°F.

            Tom Cobett
            Cleveland, OH

            "In Pyro Veritas"
          • jfire@satx.rr.com
            I recall seeing a chart of glow colors vs temperatures for steel. if you put a piece of steel in the molten aluminum until it is the same temperature as the
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 20, 2004
              I recall seeing a chart of glow colors vs temperatures for steel. if you put a piece of steel in the molten aluminum until it is the same temperature as the aluminum, then take it out and look at the glow color, you should be able to get a resonable idea of the temperature of the aluminum.

              I found a color chart at this address.

              http://www.beautifuliron.com/usingthe.htm

              What is the concensus of the group on this idea?


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Aaron Toney <joeboy@...>
              Date: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 2:33 pm
              Subject: [hobbicast] Glow Temperature of Aluminum...

              >
              >
              >
              > I am trying to track down at about what temperature molten AL 6061
              > starts to glow visibly orange. Does anyone know of a good resource for
              > this type of information. I am saving up for a pyrometer but it is
              > goingto be a while.
              >
              > Any help would be appreciated.
              >
              > Thanks, Aaron
              >
              >
              > This list is for discussion of metal casting
              > and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to
              > share photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message
              > to: sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
              > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
              > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
              >
              > Files area and list services are at:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast For problems that cannot
              > be otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
              > owly@...
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • rgsparber@aol.com
              Doing a color comparison sounds rather cumbersome to me. As a newbie, it did not take long to figure out by time and viscosity when the melt was ready. I
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 21, 2004
                Doing a color comparison sounds rather cumbersome to me. As a newbie, it did
                not take long to figure out by time and viscosity when the melt was ready. I
                later bought a thermocouple which is more precise and my pours improved
                slightly (maybe).

                In Gingery's (God rest his sole) first book, he points out that for hobby
                work it is good enough to just use time and sight to gage temperature.

                One thing that threw me way off was looking at color in direct sunlight vs
                shade vs artificial light. The first time I started a pour near sunset, I
                grossly misjudged and the melt was not ready. However, the color of the pour in
                darkness is very interesting.

                Rick Sparber

                rgsparber@...
                my website: rgsparber.fifthprime.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • John Grant
                ... It might work, but Harbor Freight sells a thermocouple meter for $30 or less. John Grant
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 21, 2004
                  jfire@... wrote:

                  >I recall seeing a chart of glow colors vs temperatures for steel. if you put a piece of steel in the molten aluminum until it is the same temperature as the aluminum, then take it out and look at the glow color, you should be able to get a resonable idea of the temperature of the aluminum.
                  >
                  >I found a color chart at this address.
                  >
                  >http://www.beautifuliron.com/usingthe.htm
                  >
                  >What is the concensus of the group on this idea?
                  >
                  It might work, but Harbor Freight sells a thermocouple meter for $30 or
                  less.

                  John Grant

                  >
                  >
                • rgsparber@aol.com
                  In a message dated 10/21/2004 7:01:50 AM Pacific Daylight Time, grantjoh@pacbell.net writes: It might work, but Harbor Freight sells a thermocouple meter for
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 21, 2004
                    In a message dated 10/21/2004 7:01:50 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
                    grantjoh@... writes:

                    It might work, but Harbor Freight sells a thermocouple meter for $30 or
                    less.


                    John,

                    I bought one of these - buyer beware. The METER can register up to above the
                    temp used to melt AL but the thermocouple will burn up the first time it is
                    dunked into the melt. The insulation on the their thermocouple can't take
                    anything near these temperatures. I still use the meter buy bought a used
                    thermocouple.

                    Rick Sparber

                    rgsparber@...
                    my website: rgsparber.fifthprime.com


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • John Norman
                    If you re looking at pyrometers, Independent Foundry in Los Angeles has some reasonably-priced analog ones. They also sell the probes individually for, I
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 23, 2004
                      If you're looking at pyrometers, Independent Foundry in Los Angeles has some
                      reasonably-priced analog ones. They also sell the probes individually for, I think, around
                      $20-25. Use one of these with a digital voltmeter or a DMM with a temp scale, and you're
                      in business. Charts to convert voltage to temp with these type 'K' thermocouples are
                      available all over the place.

                      Temp conversions:
                      http://www.temperatures.com/tctables.html

                      Contact info (also be sure to stop in if you live in the Los Angeles area)

                      Independent Foundry Supply Co
                      (323) 725-1051
                      6463 Canning St
                      Los Angeles, CA 90040

                      John N.
                    • James (Jim) Buchanan
                      Here are two notes that I saved from a previous discussion. I thought I might try to mix some myself in the future. Edyn, Take a look at the attached MS WORD
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 29, 2006
                        Here are two notes that I saved from a previous discussion. I thought I
                        might try to mix some myself in the future.

                        Edyn,

                        Take a look at the attached MS WORD (I did not save this file
                        SORRY)document that is freely extracted form the CLAYTONE.NET website. This
                        will explain how organo bentone clays work and what can be used as a polar
                        additive.

                        We buy Propylene Carbonate in the US for less than $1.00 per pound.

                        Tom Cobett
                        Cleveland, OH


                        Sources for propylene carbonate.

                        BASF
                        ARCO
                        ACETO
                        Huntsman

                        You may have the best luck in buying smaller amounts from companies who sell
                        materials to pain manufacturers. These same supply companies will also have
                        organo-clays available. If they will not sell PC or Bentone in a small
                        package, find a local paint or coatings manufacturer in the ohone book.
                        Drive over with your own containers, wave some cash in their face, and ask
                        if you could buy a few gallons or a few pounds of what you need.

                        Tom Cobett
                        Cleveland, OH
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.