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Re:lead weighted wood putter

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  • Daniel C. Postellon
    ... From: Ben Barlow To: Sent: Tuesday, August 17, 2004 9:54 PM Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Digest Number
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 20 5:19 PM
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ben Barlow" <bbarlow@...>
      To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, August 17, 2004 9:54 PM
      Subject: Re: [hobbicast] Digest Number 2118


      > Hi.
      > I was adding lead for weight to a wooden putter I'm making, and I was
      > surprised by the results. (Don't know why - having never done anything
      > like that, I had no expectations) I've been following this group for a
      > while now, and thought I would ask experts about what I observed and
      > how to do it better.
      >
      > The putter head is wood, a half circle about an inch thick and 4"
      > diameter. I drilled some 3/4" holes in the face, about 1/2 to 1" deep.
      > Then I melted some lead wheel weights into a "crucible" (a length of
      > 3/4 copper pipe with the end closed) with a Bernz torch and then heated
      > the whole thing for a while. The lead seemed like it was pretty liquid,
      > and I skimmed of the crap from the weights, grabbed the pipe with a
      > pair of pliers and poured it into the holes in the putter head. Smoke!
      > Bubbles! It was like the lead started to boil in the wood.
      >
      > It seems to turned out OK. Although the lead doesn't quite seem to
      > adhere to the edges of the wood in places, it trimmed smooth with a
      > bandsaw. But my questions:
      > - why the bubbles?

      I woulg guess that you are boiling water from the wood, maybe resins and
      such as well

      >Should I heat the "crucible" for less time?

      If I'm right, that won't help. You might want to try microwaving the wood
      putter first, to boil out all the water


      > - has the lead adhered to wood inside the head, or should I undercut
      > the hole in some way to get a physical connection?

      The lead will shink, too. I would undercut it.

      > - when I file and sand the lead face, what safety precautions should I
      > follow? Is one of those white slip-on masks enough, or should I use a
      > respirator?

      Maybe you don't want to do this at all. I'd recommend a respirator and
      gloves, and wash your hand well. What are you planning to do with the lead
      filings?
      Dan
    • Ben Barlow
      ... Thanks for the response, Dan. The pour molten lead into a wood cavity approach did not work well. It charred the wood, and did not adhere well (at all,
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 29 8:57 PM
        >> Hi.
        >> I was adding lead for weight to a wooden putter I'm making, and I was
        >> surprised by the results. (Don't know why - having never done anything
        >> like that, I had no expectations) I've been following this group for a
        >> while now, and thought I would ask experts about what I observed and
        >> how to do it better.
        >>
        >> The putter head is wood, a half circle about an inch thick and 4"
        >> diameter. I drilled some 3/4" holes in the face, about 1/2 to 1" deep.
        >> Then I melted some lead wheel weights into a "crucible" (a length of
        >> 3/4 copper pipe with the end closed) with a Bernz torch and then
        >> heated
        >> the whole thing for a while. The lead seemed like it was pretty
        >> liquid,
        >> and I skimmed of the crap from the weights, grabbed the pipe with a
        >> pair of pliers and poured it into the holes in the putter head. Smoke!
        >> Bubbles! It was like the lead started to boil in the wood.
        >>
        >> It seems to turned out OK. Although the lead doesn't quite seem to
        >> adhere to the edges of the wood in places, it trimmed smooth with a
        >> bandsaw. But my questions:
        >> - why the bubbles?
        >
        > I woulg guess that you are boiling water from the wood, maybe resins
        > and
        > such as well
        >
        >> Should I heat the "crucible" for less time?
        >
        > If I'm right, that won't help. You might want to try microwaving the
        > wood
        > putter first, to boil out all the water
        >
        >
        >> - has the lead adhered to wood inside the head, or should I undercut
        >> the hole in some way to get a physical connection?
        >
        > The lead will shink, too. I would undercut it.
        >
        >> - when I file and sand the lead face, what safety precautions
        >> should I
        >> follow? Is one of those white slip-on masks enough, or should I use a
        >> respirator?
        >
        > Maybe you don't want to do this at all. I'd recommend a respirator and
        > gloves, and wash your hand well. What are you planning to do with
        > the lead
        > filings?
        > Dan
        Thanks for the response, Dan. The "pour molten lead into a wood cavity"
        approach did not work well. It charred the wood, and did not adhere
        well (at all, really). Undercutting the cavity would keep the lead from
        falling out, but it would still be loose.

        I've changed my strategy, and decided to epoxy cast weights into holes
        drilled into the putter. I can cast the weights to size by pouring the
        lead into a drilled hole in a piece of wood and tapping it out.

        My basement is equipped with a good exhaust fan, and I use a respirator
        (no gloves), and have been washing my hands. The lead fillings I
        generate from filing the glued-in weights, and the dust from sanding
        the lead surface I have cleaned up with my shop vac. The filings I
        don't mind .. the dust I don't like. I'm going to stop sanding, and
        cover the lead with a wooden plug.

        This should be safe enough, right?
        Ben
      • Daniel C Postellon
        Probably not to OSHA standards, but it sounds good to me.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 30 7:47 AM
          Probably not to OSHA standards, but it sounds good to me.
          >>> Hi.
          >>> I was adding lead for weight to a wooden putter I'm making, and I was
          >>> surprised by the results. (Don't know why - having never done anything
          >>> like that, I had no expectations) I've been following this group for a
          >>> while now, and thought I would ask experts about what I observed and
          >>> how to do it better.
          >>>
          >>> The putter head is wood, a half circle about an inch thick and 4"
          >>> diameter. I drilled some 3/4" holes in the face, about 1/2 to 1" deep.
          >>> Then I melted some lead wheel weights into a "crucible" (a length of
          >>> 3/4 copper pipe with the end closed) with a Bernz torch and then
          >>> heated
          >>> the whole thing for a while. The lead seemed like it was pretty
          >>> liquid,
          >>> and I skimmed of the crap from the weights, grabbed the pipe with a
          >>> pair of pliers and poured it into the holes in the putter head. Smoke!
          >>> Bubbles! It was like the lead started to boil in the wood.
          >>>
          >>> It seems to turned out OK. Although the lead doesn't quite seem to
          >>> adhere to the edges of the wood in places, it trimmed smooth with a
          >>> bandsaw. But my questions:
          >>> - why the bubbles?
          >>
          >> I woulg guess that you are boiling water from the wood, maybe resins
          >> and
          >> such as well
          >>
          >>> Should I heat the "crucible" for less time?
          >>
          >> If I'm right, that won't help. You might want to try microwaving the
          >> wood
          >> putter first, to boil out all the water
          >>
          >>
          >>> - has the lead adhered to wood inside the head, or should I undercut
          >>> the hole in some way to get a physical connection?
          >>
          >> The lead will shink, too. I would undercut it.
          >>
          >>> - when I file and sand the lead face, what safety precautions
          >>> should I
          >>> follow? Is one of those white slip-on masks enough, or should I use a
          >>> respirator?
          >>
          >> Maybe you don't want to do this at all. I'd recommend a respirator and
          >> gloves, and wash your hand well. What are you planning to do with
          >> the lead
          >> filings?
          >> Dan
          > Thanks for the response, Dan. The "pour molten lead into a wood cavity"
          > approach did not work well. It charred the wood, and did not adhere
          > well (at all, really). Undercutting the cavity would keep the lead from
          > falling out, but it would still be loose.
          >
          > I've changed my strategy, and decided to epoxy cast weights into holes
          > drilled into the putter. I can cast the weights to size by pouring the
          > lead into a drilled hole in a piece of wood and tapping it out.
          >
          > My basement is equipped with a good exhaust fan, and I use a respirator
          > (no gloves), and have been washing my hands. The lead fillings I
          > generate from filing the glued-in weights, and the dust from sanding
          > the lead surface I have cleaned up with my shop vac. The filings I
          > don't mind .. the dust I don't like. I'm going to stop sanding, and
          > cover the lead with a wooden plug.
          >
          > This should be safe enough, right?
          > Ben
          >
          >
          >
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