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Re: [hobbicast] flux for brass and bronze

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  • Ray Brandes
    I concur. To elaborate on the glass, use clear glass that food came in. Break it up. Use a heaping tablespoon of glass and a big pinch of borax. Just before I
    Message 1 of 10 , May 2, 2004
      I concur. To elaborate on the glass, use clear glass that food came in.
      Break it up. Use a heaping tablespoon of glass and a big pinch of borax.
      Just before I pour, I wipe the glass off the top of the melt with a
      chunk of iron and stir in some phosperized copper at the same time. The
      glass sticks to the iron and brings all the slag with it.
      Ray in FLA

      Doug Ayen wrote:

      >I've used, with success, plain glass, borax, and the brass/bronze
      >flux from Budget Casting Supply. Can't honestly say I've seen
      >much difference, though the commercial flux from BCS sure stinks
      >up the place.
      >
      >--doug
      >
      >Quoth Gregbone (lifeinjapan@...):
      >
      >
      >>Hello all,
      >>Just wondering what would be a good, cheap flux and dross remover for
      >>bronze and/or brass melts.
      >>
    • Jim Kreter
      Ray, is there a particular brand or specific name for the phosphorized copper? The local foundry supply clerk gave me a blank look and couldnt find it in their
      Message 2 of 10 , May 2, 2004
        Ray,

        is there a particular brand or specific name for the phosphorized copper?

        The local foundry supply clerk gave me a blank look and couldnt find it in
        their
        catalog.

        regards,
        Jim
      • Ray Brandes
        Jim, I got my shot from Atlas metals. It comes in little plastic packets. I bought 4 packs when I first purchased ingot from them a few years ago and am only
        Message 3 of 10 , May 3, 2004
          Jim,
          I got my shot from Atlas metals. It comes in little plastic packets.
          I bought 4 packs when I first purchased ingot from them a few years ago
          and am only on the second pack. I put a pack in an old spice container
          and just tap out a pinch into a metal container and it waits there until
          I skim just before the pour.
          You can also use phosper copper welding rod available from welding
          supply or refridgeration supply houses. This stuff is kind of
          rectangular and is used to solder copper. Just drop a couple of inches
          of this into your melt and give a stir just before you pour.
          Regards, Ray

          http://www.atlasmetal.com/

          Jim Kreter wrote:

          >Ray,
          >
          >is there a particular brand or specific name for the phosphorized copper?
          >
          >
        • giesser@aol.com
          Ask for Phos-Copper Shot! This is used in very small amounts to remove the Oxygen from Copper Alloys. Lithium also works well, but, is hard to get in small
          Message 4 of 10 , May 3, 2004
            Ask for Phos-Copper Shot! This is used in very small amounts to remove the
            Oxygen from Copper Alloys. Lithium also works well, but, is hard to get in small
            quantities, and, very dangerous to handle.

            Any company that sells Copper base ingot should also have the Phos-Copper
            Shot. The usage rate is as low as 1 ounce per 100 lb. of metal being treated.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • ihcaster_2000
            McMaster Carr has Silver/Copper/Phosphorous Alloy- Use when brazing copper and its alloys. Phosphorous acts as a fluxing agent. Not recommended for ferrous or
            Message 5 of 10 , May 3, 2004
              McMaster Carr has Silver/Copper/Phosphorous Alloy- Use when brazing
              copper and its alloys. Phosphorous acts as a fluxing agent. Not
              recommended for ferrous or nickel metals.

              --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, giesser@a... wrote:
              > Ask for Phos-Copper Shot! This is used in very small amounts to
              remove the
              > Oxygen from Copper Alloys. Lithium also works well, but, is hard to
              get in small
              > quantities, and, very dangerous to handle.
              >
              > Any company that sells Copper base ingot should also have the
              Phos-Copper
              > Shot. The usage rate is as low as 1 ounce per 100 lb. of metal being
              treated.
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • creepinogie@yahoo.com
              But try to get the rods without the silver in them. They have the plain copper/phoshper ones. They are copper colored, about 18 long and rectangular cross
              Message 6 of 10 , May 3, 2004
                But try to get the rods without the silver in them. They have the
                plain copper/phoshper ones. They are copper colored, about 18" long
                and rectangular cross section. come in a clear plastic tube package.
                Every welding shop has them.
                Lyle
                PS, I'll have to try the glass trick. Heard about it before but never
                tried it. Will it goop up the crucible after a few pours?



                -- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "ihcaster_2000" <ihcaster_2000@y...>
                wrote:
                > McMaster Carr has Silver/Copper/Phosphorous Alloy- Use when brazing
                > copper and its alloys. Phosphorous acts as a fluxing agent. Not
                > recommended for ferrous or nickel metals.
                >
                > --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, giesser@a... wrote:
                > > Ask for Phos-Copper Shot! This is used in very small amounts to
                > remove the
                > > Oxygen from Copper Alloys. Lithium also works well, but, is hard
                to
                > get in small
                > > quantities, and, very dangerous to handle.
                > >
                > > Any company that sells Copper base ingot should also have the
                > Phos-Copper
                > > Shot. The usage rate is as low as 1 ounce per 100 lb. of metal
                being
                > treated.
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ray Brandes
                Lyle, Some glass will stay in the crucible, but what is below the melt rises to the top and what is above the melt flows down to the surface. I dosn t all come
                Message 7 of 10 , May 3, 2004
                  Lyle,
                  Some glass will stay in the crucible, but what is below the melt rises
                  to the top and what is above the melt flows down to the surface. I
                  dosn't all come out, but it dosn't build up either.
                  Regards, Ray

                  creepinogie@... wrote:

                  >But try to get the rods without the silver in them. They have the
                  >plain copper/phoshper ones. They are copper colored, about 18" long
                  >and rectangular cross section. come in a clear plastic tube package.
                  >Every welding shop has them.
                  >Lyle
                  >PS, I'll have to try the glass trick. Heard about it before but never
                  >tried it. Will it goop up the crucible after a few pours?
                  >
                  >
                  >
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