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Re: Cast Alloys found in Scrap Autos

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  • giesser@aol.com
    OK, guys. I haven t been active in the discussions for a while, so I owe you this. Sources of known to be good casting scrap from autos. Aluminum - Intake
    Message 1 of 12 , May 2, 2004
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      OK, guys. I haven't been active in the discussions for a while, so I owe you
      this.

      Sources of known to be good casting scrap from autos.

      Aluminum - Intake manifolds are usually 319 Aluminum and fairly easy to break
      up. Transmission housings and pistons are usually 380 or 390 Aluminum. This
      is a die casting alloy and not that great for sand casting. BUT, if you mix it
      50/50 with extruded or sheet aluminum, you will end up with a fairly decent
      sand casting alloy. Aluminum wheels are either 356 or 380/390. The problem is
      that they are bitch to break up into small pieces. You may be better off to turn
      them into to the scrap dealer and buy some 356 or 319 Aluminum for sand
      casting.

      Iron - There are several good sources of cast iron in an automobile. I like
      exhaust manifolds, brake drums, disk brake rotors, camshafts, differential gear
      carriers, and even blocks and heads. Other good sources for cast iron are old
      cast iron radiators, bath tubs and soil pipe. If you hit iron scrap with a
      hammer, it will normally just give a dull thunk. If it rings like a bell, it is
      likely to be steel, or maybe ductile iron. If you melt ductile iron, it
      becomes gray cast iron. Do not melt down window sash weights for castings because
      they are really high in silicon, which will give really brittle castings.
      Generally, if you can break up an iron casting with a hammer, it is gray cast iron.
      If it bends, without breaking, it is probably steel. Iron melts at about 2400
      F and steel needs at least 2900 F. You decide!

      You can melt cast iron in a gas fired crucible furnace, but, you must use a
      graphite or silicon carbide crucible.

      Good luck.

      Tom Cobett
      Cleveland, OH

      "In Pyro Veritas"


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ben_englund
      How about carborators? What kind of aluminum are they? Or are they zinc? Any difference between auto carborators and small engine carborators?
      Message 2 of 12 , May 2, 2004
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        How about carborators? What kind of aluminum are they? Or are they
        zinc? Any difference between auto carborators and small engine
        carborators?
      • Stone Tool
        I just purchased a fairly sophisticated welding power supply .... far more complex than most folks would want.... and having found that the original purchase
        Message 3 of 12 , May 2, 2004
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          I just purchased a fairly sophisticated welding power supply .... far more
          complex than most folks would want.... and having found that the original
          purchase price was $6200.00 for the unit I decided to check out Miller and
          Lincoln and see what the more current crop of similar equipment
          cost.......... In the process I discovered that Miller manufactures a line
          of induction power supplies called Intellifire XXX. The Intellifire 250 is
          a 25 KW induction power supply that operates at 10 to 50 KHZ and delivers
          25 KW @ 100% duty cycle ( max 750 amps Max 700V ). This machine is
          intended to be used for preheat and post heat in pipeline welding on site.
          Total footprint of the unit is 3.3 square feet with a total weight of 165
          lbs. It operates at 92% efficiency. An amazing unit that should be
          adaptable to induction melting. The unit itself does not require liquid
          cooling though though the coil used does. Miller sells a flexible cable
          intended for use as a an induction heating coil which is coated with
          insulation, carries water, and is flexible enough that it may be wrapped
          around a piece of pipe, also presumably ceramic insulation to go between
          the coil.

          No prices listed .... I'm sure it is a fortune far beyond us ordinary
          mortals... but it probably is not nearly as high as we have come to expect
          such products to be. It does require 480 three phase power... but we all
          have that anyway .... Right???

          H.W.
        • Ray Brandes
          I ll bet all carbs are zinc. Also fuel pump bodies, storm door handles, car door handles, on and on. Zinc (white metal, pot metal) is much heavier than
          Message 4 of 12 , May 3, 2004
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            I'll bet all carbs are zinc. Also fuel pump bodies, storm door handles,
            car door handles, on and on.
            Zinc (white metal, pot metal) is much heavier than aluminum and
            will look more gray. It is cast at a lower temperature than aluminum
            too. It melts a little higher than lead and is really nice to pour, but
            it sure shrinks a lot! Try to keep your sections thin when casting zinc.
            I found a great source of zinc. If you are near a military base
            where they shoot 40mm practice grenades, the base of the projectile is a
            big chunk of zinc. I get to pick these up at an AFB where we have a
            monthly rifle match. For a crucible, I use a stainless steel kitchen
            utensil container from Walmart.
            Regards, Ray

            ben_englund wrote:

            >How about carborators? What kind of aluminum are they? Or are they
            >zinc? Any difference between auto carborators and small engine
            >carborators?
            >
            >
          • Chris Boyer (CB)
            Most of the OEM carbs are zinc ZA3 ? You will sometimes find an AL baseplate on them. Some aftermarket carbs are AL but probably rare to find one to melt.
            Message 5 of 12 , May 3, 2004
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              Most of the OEM carbs are zinc ZA3 ? You will sometimes find an AL
              baseplate on them. Some aftermarket carbs are AL but probably rare to find
              one to melt.

              The small engine carbs I have melted have all been zinc far as I know.

              >
              > >How about carborators? What kind of aluminum are they? Or are they
              > >zinc? Any difference between auto carborators and small engine
              > >carborators?
              > >



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            • Stone Tool
              I ran across this Ebay item ...... Buehler LTD. Lab Induction Heater CAt#20-222 Item number: 3813209827 It is a small self contained induction heater for
              Message 6 of 12 , May 3, 2004
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                I ran across this Ebay item ...... Buehler LTD. Lab Induction Heater
                CAt#20-222 Item number: 3813209827

                It is a small self contained induction heater for melting .... I assume
                metals.... It is a hand held unit that operates on 115 VAC 200 watts and
                has a opening for an 1 7/8" crucible according to the description. Looks
                like an ideal tool for someone doing jewelry casting and there are no bids
                with a starting price of $24.95. Auction ends May 7 10:42 AM Pacific time.

                http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=633&item=3813209827&r
                d=1

                Someone here needs this toy I'm sure..... Check it out and buy it!


                H.W.b
              • Charles
                neat item i saw it or one like it earlier. One thing though it appears to be missing the expensive part... the power supply. Induction machines run at
                Message 7 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                  neat item i saw it or one like it earlier. One thing though

                  it appears to be missing the expensive part... the power supply.
                  Induction machines run at ultraghigh frequencies. From what i've
                  read the actual coil can and usually is simply copper tubing (the
                  kind that used to be used in your home and still is sometimes).
                  water or some form of coolant is run through the tubing to stop it
                  from melting.

                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stone Tool" <owly@t...> wrote:
                  > I ran across this Ebay item ...... Buehler LTD. Lab Induction
                  Heater
                  > CAt#20-222 Item number: 3813209827
                  >
                  > It is a small self contained induction heater for melting .... I
                  assume
                  > metals.... It is a hand held unit that operates on 115 VAC 200
                  watts and
                  > has a opening for an 1 7/8" crucible according to the
                  description. Looks
                  > like an ideal tool for someone doing jewelry casting and there are
                  no bids
                  > with a starting price of $24.95. Auction ends May 7 10:42 AM
                  Pacific time.
                  >
                  > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
                  ViewItem&category=633&item=3813209827&r
                  > d=1
                  >
                  > Someone here needs this toy I'm sure..... Check it out and buy
                  it!
                  >
                  >
                  > H.W.b
                • Ray Brandes
                  Charles, So, why does it show a standard U-ground plug? I am sure anything needing special power would have a special plug to prevent you from just plugging it
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                    Charles,
                    So, why does it show a standard U-ground plug? I am sure anything
                    needing special power would have a special plug to prevent you from just
                    plugging it into the wall.
                    Regards, Ray

                    Charles wrote:

                    >neat item i saw it or one like it earlier. One thing though
                    >
                    >it appears to be missing the expensive part... the power supply.
                    >Induction machines run at ultraghigh frequencies. From what i've
                    >
                  • Ray Brandes
                    Tom, How goes the research on that commercial microwave operation? I am just jumping out of my pants for a convienient way to pour iron. Regards, Ray
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                      Tom,
                      How goes the research on that commercial microwave operation? I am just
                      jumping out of my pants for a convienient way to pour iron.
                      Regards, Ray
                    • Stone Tool
                      Ray: It appears to be a complete unit .... at only 400 watts it is conceivable that the electronics are enclosed in the unit. The item description clearly
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                        Ray:
                        It appears to be a complete unit .... at only 400 watts it is conceivable
                        that the electronics are enclosed in the unit. The item description
                        clearly states that it runs on 110VAC.

                        H.W.

                        *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                        On 5/4/04 at 6:21 AM Ray Brandes wrote:

                        >Charles,
                        >So, why does it show a standard U-ground plug? I am sure anything
                        >needing special power would have a special plug to prevent you from just
                        >plugging it into the wall.
                        >Regards, Ray
                        >
                        >Charles wrote:
                        >
                        >>neat item i saw it or one like it earlier. One thing though
                        >>
                        >>it appears to be missing the expensive part... the power supply.
                        >>Induction machines run at ultraghigh frequencies. From what i've
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >This list is for discussion of metal casting
                        >and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share
                        >photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to:
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                        >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                        >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                        >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                        >
                        >Files area and list services are at:
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                      • scobeyguy
                        ... conceivable ... I think you guys made a fatal error based on wishful thinking, i.e. that it is for melting metal. For one thing it is only 200 watts. You
                        Message 11 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stone Tool" <owly@t...> wrote:
                          > Ray:
                          > It appears to be a complete unit .... at only 400 watts it is
                          conceivable
                          > that the electronics are enclosed in the unit. The item description
                          > clearly states that it runs on 110VAC.
                          >
                          I think you guys made a fatal error based on wishful thinking, i.e.
                          that it is for melting metal. For one thing it is only 200 watts.
                          You are not going to melt a hell of a lot of metal at that power
                          level. For another thing, Buehler specializes in manufacturing very
                          good equipment for preparing specimens for microscopic examination.
                          I have one of their very fine Isomet slicing saws. Most often when a
                          sample is being prepared for slicing, it is embedded in something
                          like epoxy or wax so that it can be mounted in the holder on the saw
                          or polishing equipment. My guess is that this is a little wax
                          melting pot.
                          Gary
                        • Stone Tool
                          Gary: My assumption here was that it was for melting a tiny amount of metal for assay purposes..... You are probably correct.... the crucible would have to
                          Message 12 of 12 , May 4, 2004
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                            Gary:
                            My assumption here was that it was for melting a tiny amount of metal for
                            assay purposes..... You are probably correct.... the "crucible" would have
                            to be induction reactive and heat up to melt whatever was in it unless the
                            stuff being heated was metal of some sort. I'd like to know more about it
                            and it's use..... The company does not even list the item.

                            H.W.

                            *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                            On 5/4/04 at 3:52 PM scobeyguy wrote:

                            >--- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Stone Tool" <owly@t...> wrote:
                            >> Ray:
                            >> It appears to be a complete unit .... at only 400 watts it is
                            >conceivable
                            >> that the electronics are enclosed in the unit. The item description
                            >> clearly states that it runs on 110VAC.
                            >>
                            >I think you guys made a fatal error based on wishful thinking, i.e.
                            >that it is for melting metal. For one thing it is only 200 watts.
                            >You are not going to melt a hell of a lot of metal at that power
                            >level. For another thing, Buehler specializes in manufacturing very
                            >good equipment for preparing specimens for microscopic examination.
                            >I have one of their very fine Isomet slicing saws. Most often when a
                            >sample is being prepared for slicing, it is embedded in something
                            >like epoxy or wax so that it can be mounted in the holder on the saw
                            >or polishing equipment. My guess is that this is a little wax
                            >melting pot.
                            >Gary
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >This list is for discussion of metal casting
                            >and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share
                            >photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to:
                            >sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                            >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                            >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                            >
                            >Files area and list services are at:
                            >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast For problems that cannot be
                            >otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
                            >owly@...
                            >
                            >
                            >Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
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