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Re: Metalized Skulls

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  • Greg
    There is a spray metalizing process that sprays a metal coating on about anyting. I can look up a source for this however it is expensive. You could also
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 3, 2004
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      There is a spray metalizing process that sprays a metal coating on
      about anyting. I can look up a source for this however it is
      expensive. You could also make the skulls in lost wax as well.


      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "t_albolabris" <sgross@b...> wrote:
      > Does anyone know how this is done?
      >
      > Here is the link...
      > http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/skullmetalize.html
    • James R. Walker
      I use a formula that contains copper which can be painted or sprayed over anything. Once it dries, it is conductive and can be plated. I usually plate copper
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 3, 2004
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        I use a formula that contains copper which can be painted or sprayed
        over anything. Once it dries, it is conductive and can be plated. I
        usually plate copper first, followed by nickel & gold or silver, or
        whatever. --Jim Walker (walkermetalsmith.com)
      • creepinogie@yahoo.com
        I think those guys are just using some metal powder impregnated resin or paint. their own site says it s only 96% or so metal which means there s about 4%
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
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          I think those guys are just using some metal powder impregnated resin
          or paint. their own site says it's only 96% or so metal which means
          there's about 4% binder (resin) which must be the waetherproofing
          they are referring to.
          LL

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "James R. Walker" <james@w...>
          wrote:
          > I use a formula that contains copper which can be painted or
          sprayed
          > over anything. Once it dries, it is conductive and can be plated.
          I
          > usually plate copper first, followed by nickel & gold or silver, or
          > whatever. --Jim Walker (walkermetalsmith.com)
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