Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [hobbicast] furnace

Expand Messages
  • DRF
    I built the gingery propane furnace pretty much exactly as the plans called for in the book. It works ok, but is a bit shaky (light duty) Id beef it up
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2004
      I built the gingery propane furnace pretty much exactly as the plans called
      for in the book. It works ok, but is a bit shaky (light duty) Id beef it up
      cosiderably if I was building another one. Maybe design something around a
      garage door roller, rather than the wimpy little sliding door rollers called
      for.

      Doug
      -----Original Message-----
      From: metalmaster1766 <rss1766@...>
      To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Friday, January 30, 2004 9:26 AM
      Subject: [hobbicast] furnace


      >im building a propane furnace, im wondering if anyone can help with
      >the gingery lifting mechanism, detailed pictures, drawings, possibly
      >with measurments, charcoal furnace works great, just not big
      >enough, thanks
      > Ron
      >
      >
      >
      >This list is for discussion of metal casting
      >and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share
      photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to:
      sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
      >Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
      >http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
      >
      >Files area and list services are at:
      >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicastFor problems that cannot be
      otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
      >owly@...
      >
      >blems that cannot be otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
      >owly@...
      >
      >
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast/
      >
      >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > hobbicast-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • Lance Eggleston
      Grey cast iron melts 2000 - 2200 F. Mizzou has higher thermal conductivity than Kaowool, but can withstand the 2500 F flames. The Kaowool is the insulating
      Message 2 of 7 , May 19, 2015
        Grey cast iron melts 2000 - 2200 F.

        Mizzou has higher thermal conductivity than Kaowool, but can withstand the 2500 F flames.

        The Kaowool is the insulating layer. 
        The pink fiberglass fills up the space in the tank so the small
        crux will have a little space around it for the tongs, if needed.

        More insulation = more heat kept inside where the melting take place = useful work,
        rather than heat loss to the universe which increases entropy.
         dG = dH - TdS
        lance
        ++++



        Jeremy Winder wrote:

        Nieve question. Why so much insulation, are you concerned about the shell getting hot?

        As for the floor I would do whatever I was planning for the sides.

        On Tue, May 19, 2015 at 12:48 PM, Lance Eggleston wheezer606@... [hobbicast] <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
         

        This thread has gotten chewed up,

        so I renamed it and will re-post my original question
        re melting grey cast iron.

        I intend to use a 20# propane tank as the outer shell.
        Use 1” 3000 F castable missou for the hot face,
        then 2” 2000 F kaowool for the inner layer
        then use 4” 1000 F pink fiberglass.

        This should leave room for a small crux for the cast iron.

        ?? What should the floor of the furnace be made of?
        2“ 2400 F firebrick on sand?
        poured 3000 F mizzou?

        lance
        ++++
        On May 19, 2015, at 2:29 AM, michael.a.porter@... [hobbicast] <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


        Malcolm,
        My own tests with a sol of Zirconium oxide worked out  about 20% greater radiance; I found that quite impressive, as radiant heat is the major mode of energy transfer at casting temperatures; does this mean I'm getting twenty percent more heat? Yes/no/maybe. But, Zircar did a big field test of their high-emissive coating, keeping records of the project for a year long period and claims 30% fuel savings with their product. Fuel savings and raised temperatures are "apples and oranges." for some and very much to the point for others. However, the estimated 20% kick I got has translated to very short melt times, along with the estimated 20% greater heat levels from sealed burner ports, which single combustion wave burners make practical. 20 here and 20 there; it adds up pretty quick. Is that any reason for you to rush out and buy one of these big $$$ coatings? Probably not, but then, they aren't the only way to get high radiance in your furnace, either...I know the way, and if you're very, very nice, I'll tell you how :-)
        Mikey


        -- 
        Jeremy - Columbus, GA USA
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.