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Charcoal furnace

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  • stephenandrobbin
    I m new here, and I m sure this topic has been covered many times before, but here goes. I m tring to make a charcoal furnance for casting and heat treating.
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 5, 2003
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      I'm new here, and I'm sure this topic has been covered many times
      before, but here goes. I'm tring to make a charcoal furnance for
      casting and heat treating. Is it better to make the furnance from
      fire brick, or castable refractory, or something else?

      Thanks,
      Steve
    • HLahantubbe
      A lot depends on you, space and what you re doing with it. For the beginner, I think a castable refractory style (ala Gingery) is probably the best. It s a
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 6, 2003
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        A lot depends on you, space and what you're doing with it.

        For the beginner, I think a castable refractory style (ala Gingery) is
        probably the best. It's a great compromise on all fronts and facets. It's
        darn near fool-proof to build, works like a champ and avoids pitfalls that
        many "starter outers" find themselves in.

        The cost is minimal and it teaches you alot about the construction. The size
        is good for most beginning projects -- you want to start out relatively
        small in your castings -- very small and very large castings require
        different techniques and approaches. I think most here (if not all) started
        out with charcoal and I'm still using it, though I have some upcoming
        projects that will require a somewhat larger furnace.

        Hope this helps, welcome aboard.

        Jim RabidWolf
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "stephenandrobbin" <clubb2@...>
        To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2003 10:12 PM
        Subject: [hobbicast] Charcoal furnace


        > I'm new here, and I'm sure this topic has been covered many times
        > before, but here goes. I'm tring to make a charcoal furnance for
        > casting and heat treating. Is it better to make the furnance from
        > fire brick, or castable refractory, or something else?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Steve
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > This list is for discussion of metal casting
        > and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share
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      • Ed Paradis
        Steve, the firebrick works well, but may be difficult to fit into what ever container you re planning on using. The castable refractory has the advantage that
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 6, 2003
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          Steve, the firebrick works well, but may be difficult to fit into
          what ever container you're planning on using. The castable
          refractory has the advantage that you can form and mold it to fit the
          container that you wish to use. If your containter is large enough,
          you can form the core with the firebrick and then backup with the
          castable. There are many options that you can do to make a workable
          furnace. The main thing is the insulation value of the unit, you
          obviously want to be able to retain as much of the heat as possible,
          so that it can do it's work.

          Ed

          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "stephenandrobbin" <clubb2@j...>
          wrote:
          > I'm new here, and I'm sure this topic has been covered many times
          > before, but here goes. I'm tring to make a charcoal furnance for
          > casting and heat treating. Is it better to make the furnance from
          > fire brick, or castable refractory, or something else?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Steve
        • Dan Brewer
          This will depend onhow big you want to make the furnace and how much you are willing to spend. Charcoal is not the fuel of choicefor heat treating. the fule
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 6, 2003
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            This will depend onhow big you want to make the furnace and how much you are willing to spend. Charcoal is not the fuel of choicefor heat treating. the fule of choice is eletricity. Control is the name of the game here. Long heats and temp is tightly controled. All that is done with eletricity with much greater ease than any other fuel. Now for melting you have many more choices . Oil, Propane, Natural gas, Eletric, charcoal. My bias is twards propane.. A burner can be made out of common pluming parts with hand tools. The controls are easy to operate. The operation is fairly clean .
            So having said all that , What is best. It depends. To start I would build a coffee can furnace. They are small and you can gain a lot of experience with out a large expence in molten metal. Here are some links. http://www.duwaynesplace.com/Coffee_Can_Furnace.html
            http://www.nucleus.com/~harlan/foundry2.html
            http://www9.ocn.ne.jp/~backyard/torchfurnace.html
            http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/bucketfurnace1.html
            http://metal.duncanamps.com/furnace_bucket.php
            http://www.host33.com/casting/index.html
            Here is a larger furnace
            http://www.hal-pc.org/~lwhill/freon-foundry.html

            All of these sites have information on the coffee can furnace./ Most of them use castable refractory.
            Now fro heat terat operations you will need a different shaped furnace to hold your part whyle it is being heated. You need to have several inches of room all arounf the part for the oven/ furnace to be effective. The part being heat treated can never come into contace with the sides of the furnace. I would make the furnace out of insulating brick sourounded with 2-3 inches of Kawool and that in a expamded steel enclouser. A welded steel frame for the brick. of look for a bead kiln. Pottery stores might have waht you are looking for.
            I hope this help a little
            Dan in Auburn

            stephenandrobbin <clubb2@...> wrote:
            I'm new here, and I'm sure this topic has been covered many times
            before, but here goes. I'm tring to make a charcoal furnance for
            casting and heat treating. Is it better to make the furnance from
            fire brick, or castable refractory, or something else?

            Thanks,
            Steve




            This list is for discussion of metal casting
            and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to: sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
            For additional file and picture space you may upload files of interest to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/castingproject
            Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
            http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

            Files area and list services are at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            hobbicast-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            For problems that cannot be otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
            owly@...



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