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  • srussin2000
    hi all. ill get to the point. im a gun nut and i had an idea. what if i cast firearm partsfor replacement or repair? but i dont know the first thing about
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
      hi all. ill get to the point. im a gun nut and i had an idea. what if
      i cast firearm partsfor replacement or repair? but i dont know the
      first thing about casting. and some questions come to mind. how
      detailed will the parts be? how strong will they be? how accurate to
      the original? if anyone can help me out that be great.
    • Ron Thompson
      Your question isn t specific enough for a good answer. Cast them in what metal? By what method? Which parts? I think some parts are illegal to make, unless you
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
        Your question isn't specific enough for a good answer.
        Cast them in what metal?
        By what method?
        Which parts? I think some parts are illegal to make, unless you are licensed. Some would be dangerous, if cast.

        I used to have a small 22 cal. pistol that met every definition of Saturday Night Special. It was mostly cast aluminum. The barrel had a steel sleeve inside cast aluminum. even the frame was cast aluminum. The hammer, trigger, cylinder and spring were steel.
        Most gun repairs are best done with factory parts.

        Ron Thompson
        On the Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast
        USA

        Email me for current special offers on items from http://www.plansandprojects.com

        Grave yards are full of people who thought the law could, should and would protect them.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: srussin2000
        To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, June 06, 2003 11:14 AM
        Subject: [hobbicast] newbie


        hi all. ill get to the point. im a gun nut and i had an idea. what if
        i cast firearm partsfor replacement or repair? but i dont know the
        first thing about casting. and some questions come to mind. how
        detailed will the parts be? how strong will they be? how accurate to
        the original? if anyone can help me out that be great.


        This list is for discussion of metal casting
        and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to: sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • GuyW
        Sounds like a fun home project.... -Guy- BTW Saturday night special is a non-technical epithet used by gun haters ... barrel had a steel sleeve inside cast
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
          Sounds like a fun home project....

          -Guy-
          BTW "Saturday night special" is a non-technical epithet used by gun haters

          > I used to have a small 22 cal. pistol ....It was mostly cast aluminum. The
          barrel had a steel sleeve inside cast aluminum. even the frame was cast
          aluminum. The hammer, trigger, cylinder and spring were steel.
        • Ron Thompson
          Well, I am far from being a gun hater. To me Saturday Night Special is a cheap gun that is not good for much of anything. It is too cheap to hold up long and
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
            Well, I am far from being a gun hater.
            To me Saturday Night Special is a cheap gun that is not good for much of anything. It is too cheap to hold up long and about as accurate as a mud splatter.

            Ron Thompson
            On the Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast
            USA

            Email me for current special offers on items from http://www.plansandprojects.com

            Grave yards are full of people who thought the law could, should and would protect them.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: GuyW
            To: hobbicast@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, June 06, 2003 1:56 PM
            Subject: Re: [hobbicast] newbie


            Sounds like a fun home project....

            -Guy-
            BTW "Saturday night special" is a non-technical epithet used by gun haters

            > I used to have a small 22 cal. pistol ....It was mostly cast aluminum. The
            barrel had a steel sleeve inside cast aluminum. even the frame was cast
            aluminum. The hammer, trigger, cylinder and spring were steel.



            This list is for discussion of metal casting
            and does not accept attachments. For off topic discussion and to share photos and stuff: join Sandcrabs by sending a blank message to: sandcrabs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
            or join the Coffee Lounge group (by approval)
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast_coffee_lounge/

            Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
            http://budgetcastingsupply.com/

            Files area and list services are at:
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            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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            For problems that cannot be otherwise solved contact the list owner by email:
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            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Chris Boyer
            A little info here 1st I am not a gut nut but I do have a customer I have done some work for. He sells gun parts, advertises in many gun mags. ships world
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
              A little info here

              1st I am not a gut nut but I do have a customer I have done some work for.
              He sells gun parts, advertises in many gun mags. ships world wide, has made
              a living (part time) doing it for over 25 years. He does NOT sell complete
              guns, kits or manufacture these parts. He only sells parts.

              As it has been explained to me he does not need a license to do this. Must
              fall under some loop holes in the Regs? I don't know didn't ask. Its been
              about 2 years since I last saw him. At the time he was talking about
              getting out, new rules and associated crap from gun control freaks. No
              don't start on that thread just a mention.

              > hi all. ill get to the point. im a gun nut and i had an idea. what if
              > i cast firearm partsfor replacement or repair? but i dont know the
              > first thing about casting. and some questions come to mind. how
              > detailed will the parts be?

              Depends on your molding skills and the type of sand you use.
              Die casting may be an alternative. read $$$$$

              > how strong will they be?

              Depends on the alloy used to cast the parts.
              Alloy required must be determined by the final products requirenments.

              > how accurate to the original?

              They will be smaller if using an original as a pattern. how much depends on
              the alloy used.
              They will need machining and finishing Again die casting may help.

              > if anyone can help me out that be great.

              I believe much research will be in the future. First of all finding out
              what paperwork the GVmT will require.
              Second finding out what materials will best suit the parts you want to cast.
              This should lead you to the method best used to cast those parts.

              I wish you good luck. I suspect you will need it and lots of patience ;)

              >



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            • Daniel C. Postellon
              ... From: GuyW To: Sent: Friday, June 06, 2003 2:56 PM Subject: Re: [hobbicast] newbie ... Some state laws
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "GuyW" <guyiii@...>
                To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, June 06, 2003 2:56 PM
                Subject: Re: [hobbicast] newbie


                > Sounds like a fun home project....
                >
                > -Guy-
                > BTW "Saturday night special" is a non-technical epithet used by gun haters
                >
                Some state laws specifically designated any pistol with die cast non-ferrous
                parts as a "Saturday Night Special".
              • GuyW
                ... haters ... non-ferrous ... That a government decreed so doesn t negate the fact that it s still a non-technical definition by gun haters
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
                  > > BTW "Saturday night special" is a non-technical epithet used by gun
                  haters
                  > >
                  > Some state laws specifically designated any pistol with die cast
                  non-ferrous
                  > parts as a "Saturday Night Special".

                  That a government decreed so doesn't negate the fact that it's still a
                  "non-technical" definition by gun haters
                • Martin Gutzmer
                  Hi I need to make a mold of a small aluminum part - so I can duplicate it. I thought about using RTV Blue as a mold, cutting along the old parting line, making
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
                    Hi
                    I need to make a mold of a small aluminum part - so I can duplicate it.
                    I thought about using RTV Blue as a mold, cutting along the old parting
                    line, making some wax positives from that, and setting them up in plaster,
                    then casting them in aluminum.
                    Thoughts, steps, ideas.
                    Suggestions greatly
                  • Brian Whatcott
                    Martin, There was useful input on saving dinosaur prints recently, using silicone to lost wax etc. Here is Andrew Werby s contribution again. Followed by
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 6, 2003
                      Martin,
                      There was useful input on saving dinosaur prints recently, using
                      silicone to lost wax etc. Here is Andrew Werby's contribution again.
                      Followed by another post mentioning cheaper materials from Lyle.
                      I pasted that under Andrew's note.

                      Brian Whatcott Altus OK
                      p.s. If you can see a parting line, the piece could have been
                      sand cast - which you could repeat?



                      >I have 3 stone slabs (12 x 18 to 24 x 36) they have dinosaur foot prints in
                      >them. ... I want to cast a copy of
                      >the stone trail with the prints. ...
                      >Thanks
                      >Chris -CB-

                      > [Andrew]
                      >[The way I'd do it is with silicone rubber. First paint the stone with
                      >dishwashing liquid (the kind you use for washing dishes by hand, not in
                      >automatic machines.) Although mold-grade silicone doesn't stick to much,
                      >this will help keep it out of microcracks and pores, where it will likely
                      >stay forever. (Don't use silicone caulk- this will stick to things). When
                      >the soap is dry, paint on a thin layer of the 2-part silicone, mixed
                      >according to directions. Usually you weigh out 1 part of catalyst to 10
                      >parts of the base, mix well, then transfer to another container and mix
                      well
                      >again. When the first layer of silicone is set, usually 24 hours later,
                      >paint on another coat, using some thickening agent (I use "Viscosil" from
                      >Smooth-on, but there are other brands). This is a clear liquid that is
                      added
                      >at about 5% by weight. It will make the rubber sit up on the surface
                      instead
                      >of running off as before. Let that set 24 hours. For your third layer, mix
                      >up twice as much material as for the second, also with the thickening
                      agent.
                      >Paint on a layer, then lay some cheesecloth on the wet rubber, pressing it
                      >smooth with your rubber gloves (you've been wearing rubber gloves for all
                      >this, of course). Then apply the rest of the rubber on top. Let it set
                      >another 24, and you can either add a plaster jacket (protecting the
                      adjacent
                      >stone from the plaster with plastic sheeting or similar) or if it's really
                      >flat, just peel it up. You can cast most things into silicone rubber molds-
                      >gypsum plasters, concrete, urethane, polyester, etc. If you cast in
                      >something durable and get a good thickness, you could use that for a
                      >sand-casting pattern. Wax works well too, if you want to cast replicas
                      using
                      >the lost-wax process.]
                      >
                      >Andrew Werby
                      >www.unitedartworks.com


                      Great response. What brand of silicone rubber do you like?
                      Where do you get it?
                      Roughly how much?

                      Regards
                      Brian Whatcott Altus OK

                      [Thanks, Brian! I generally use SilPak 1624 from Douglas and Sturgess,
                      (www.artstuf.com) which is local for me. It costs nearly $100/gallon, which
                      ain't cheap. But if you use it economically, with a paint-on method like I
                      described above, it goes a long way; and it works better than anything else
                      I've tried. There's some more info on making silicone and other types of
                      rubber molds, plus some sources of supplies that might be closer to you, in
                      the Alt.Sculpture FAQs, hosted on my site: www.unitedartworks.com ]

                      Andrew Werby

                      [Lyle]
                      Go to www.smooth-on.com and get some info on their brushable urethane
                      rubber. It works great for stuff like that and is alot easier to use
                      than latex. You can make the negative rubber mold and use a pourable
                      resin to fill it for the positive which they also supply. What your
                      trying to do may be possible with one of their $25 starter kits.
                      Lyle [creepinogie...]


                      At 10:18 PM 6/6/2003 -0500,"Martin Gutzmer" <mrgutzmer@...> you
                      wrote:
                      >Hi
                      >I need to make a mold of a small aluminum part - so I can duplicate it.
                      >I thought about using RTV Blue as a mold, cutting along the old parting
                      >line, making some wax positives from that, and setting them up in plaster,
                      >then casting them in aluminum.
                      >Thoughts, steps, ideas.
                      >Suggestions greatly
                    • collegemachinist
                      For casting parts, yes you can. But, don t use scrap, get a good alloy that is heat treatable, then learn to heat treat, or send it out. Un heat-treated Al
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 7, 2003
                        For casting parts, yes you can. But, don't use scrap, get a good
                        alloy that is heat treatable, then learn to heat treat, or send it
                        out. Un heat-treated Al is rarely used, even with "Saturday night
                        specials". If you make kits for sale, or even parts, you must have a
                        liscense. However, making them ofr personal use, does not require a
                        liscense. Liscensing is more a hastle, than cost. Manufacturing
                        liscenses are not that expensive, and replacement parts can be made
                        with a gunsmithing liscense.

                        I hope I do not offend anyone. But the arguement against "Saturday
                        Night Specials" is eletist. If someone is poor and needs self
                        defense, they should be allowed to buy something that does not force
                        them to stop feeding their kids. A cheap derringer, revolver, or
                        semi auto, would fit the bill, as would a cheap chinese or russian
                        shotgun that has been cut down. I personally would never own one of
                        these, but realize that the working poor might, since they often have
                        lower priority for police response, (A neighbor called the other day
                        hysterical that someone had tried to break in, it took the police an
                        hour to arrive, because the crooks were "scared off" by hearing her
                        dial the phone).

                        Thomas

                        P.S. I went to gunsmithing School, and did custom make mostly
                        rifles, I did some handgun and shotgun work before joning the Army.
                        I have made a firearm from scratch with no serial number, but it
                        cannot be sold, ever, that is the joy of home made guns, they cannot
                        be pawned or sold, but stay in the family, unless a one gun permit is
                        applied for and a serial number added.

                        -snip-
                        BTW "Saturday night special" is a non-technical epithet used by gun
                        haters
                        Some state laws specifically designated any pistol with die cast
                        non-ferrous
                        parts as a "Saturday Night Special".
                        -Snip-
                      • Alan Condit
                        Martin, If you need to duplicate the part, you will need to build up the aluminum piece with thin material, such as sheet wax, to compensate for the
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 7, 2003
                          Martin,

                          If you need to "duplicate" the part, you will need to build up the
                          aluminum piece with thin material, such as sheet wax, to compensate
                          for the shrinkage of the aluminum. Compute the amount you need to add
                          by multiplying the dimensions of the original by the shrink factor for
                          aluminum. You will also need to add additional thickness on any areas
                          that need to be machined as a machining allowance. You can get various
                          thicknesses of sheet wax through a friendly pattern making shop, a
                          pattern making supply, from Kindt-Collins or from Freeman Mfg. &
                          Supply Co. Some of the sheet waxes have an adhesive on one side for
                          bonding to pattern pieces that have to be built up.

                          Kindt-Collins and Freeman are both on the NET. Kindt-Collins has a
                          $50 dollar minimum order. I don't know about Freeman. However, either
                          one should be able to supply you with the name of a "local"
                          distributor. I am not associated with either of them.

                          By using RTV you can get by with zero draft but you will still need to
                          coat the built up pattern with a release agent (something that will
                          release from the RTV. This depends on the type of RTV that you are using.

                          Finally check the casting group <casting@yahoogroups.com> for more
                          info on actually creating the RTV mold.

                          I bought some RTV to try something similar but I haven't tried it yet.

                          Best wishes,
                          Alan Condit
                          Alan's MachineWorks
                          www.alansmachineworks.com


                          --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Gutzmer" <mrgutzmer@a...> wrote:
                          > Hi
                          > I need to make a mold of a small aluminum part - so I can duplicate it.
                          > I thought about using RTV Blue as a mold, cutting along the old parting
                          > line, making some wax positives from that, and setting them up in
                          plaster,
                          > then casting them in aluminum.
                          > Thoughts, steps, ideas.
                          > Suggestions greatly
                        • cast_iron1488
                          i m totally new at this, i m a tattoo artist in arizona and i want to build tattoo machines, i want to make the frames out of cast iron but have no idea how to
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 13, 2005
                            i'm totally new at this, i'm a tattoo artist in arizona and i want to
                            build tattoo machines, i want to make the frames out of cast iron but
                            have no idea how to start, so hear i am. i've heard everthing
                            from "you need a centrigal casting machine" to "send the plans to a
                            foundry in asia and have them made dirt cheap".the frames are about
                            6oz of iron, any help would be awesome thanks in advance


                            Dave
                          • Rick Rowlands
                            Dave, If you don t want to go through the expense of melting and pouring your own iron I can make the castings for you. I made some tattoo gun frames for
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 13, 2005
                              Dave,

                              If you don't want to go through the expense of melting and pouring your own
                              iron I can make the castings for you. I made some tattoo gun frames for
                              another fellow last year and they worked out fine. Do you have a pic or
                              drawing that you could send me offlist of the part? I could do it cheaper
                              than just about anyone else.

                              If you want to learn to pour iron yourself I offer an ironcasting workshop
                              where I teach the basics of patterns, sandmolding, melting, pouring and
                              cleaning of castings. Its several hours long and you will leave with a full
                              grasp of the basics.

                              Rick Rowlands
                              Tod Engine Works
                              Makers of Quality iron, steel, ductile iron
                              and nonferrous castings
                              2261 Hubbard Road
                              Youngstown, OH 44505
                              330-728-2799
                              www.todengine.org/engineworks.html

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "cast_iron1488" <cast_iron1488@...>
                              To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2005 3:23 AM
                              Subject: [hobbicast] newbie


                              > i'm totally new at this, i'm a tattoo artist in arizona and i want to
                              > build tattoo machines, i want to make the frames out of cast iron but
                              > have no idea how to start, so hear i am. i've heard everthing
                              > from "you need a centrigal casting machine" to "send the plans to a
                              > foundry in asia and have them made dirt cheap".the frames are about
                              > 6oz of iron, any help would be awesome thanks in advance
                              >
                              >
                              > Dave
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                              > this list does not accept attachments.
                              >
                              > Files area and list services are at:
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                              >
                              > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                              > check out these two affiliated sites:
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                              >
                              > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                              > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                              >
                              > List Owner:
                              > owly@...
                              >
                              >
                              > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
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                            • Daniel C Postellon
                              Asia sounds good! Seriously, if you are building more than a few, you might want to consider using die casting with a zinc alloy.
                              Message 14 of 16 , Nov 13, 2005
                                Asia sounds good! Seriously, if you are building more than a few, you might
                                want to consider using die casting with a zinc alloy.

                                > i'm totally new at this, i'm a tattoo artist in arizona and i want to
                                > build tattoo machines, i want to make the frames out of cast iron but
                                > have no idea how to start, so hear i am. i've heard everthing
                                > from "you need a centrigal casting machine" to "send the plans to a
                                > foundry in asia and have them made dirt cheap".the frames are about
                                > 6oz of iron, any help would be awesome thanks in advance
                                >
                                >
                                > Dave
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                                > this list does not accept attachments.
                                >
                                > Files area and list services are at:
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                                >
                                > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                                > check out these two affiliated sites:
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                                >
                                > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                >
                                > List Owner:
                                > owly@...
                                >
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Lyle
                                Dave, You can sandcast those with good old aluminum alloy on a matchplate by the dozens for fairly cheap here (USA). A commercial matchplate will run you less
                                Message 15 of 16 , Nov 13, 2005
                                  Dave,
                                  You can sandcast those with good old aluminum alloy on a matchplate
                                  by the dozens for fairly cheap here (USA). A commercial matchplate
                                  will run you less than $1000 dollars once you make the wood master
                                  pattern. A good foundry can cast those things for probably less than
                                  $20 ea. But you need to learn a little pattern making. Come up here,
                                  and we'll cast a few in sand using one of your originals as a
                                  pattern, then you'll have a better idea of what you need to do.

                                  But basiclly, you'll need a pattern that's a little larger than the
                                  original (about 2%, for metal shrinkage) and built up on the machined
                                  surfaces (spot faced areas, etc) so once machined, it'll be the
                                  correct dimension.

                                  Don't die cast them in pot metal (zinc alloy) as they will fall apart
                                  a couple of decades later from galvanic corrosion due to the
                                  electrolitic potential difference between zinc and the other alloys.

                                  Lyle

                                  --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel C Postellon"
                                  <postello@m...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Asia sounds good! Seriously, if you are building more than a few,
                                  you might
                                  > want to consider using die casting with a zinc alloy.
                                  >
                                  > > i'm totally new at this, i'm a tattoo artist in arizona and i
                                  want to
                                  > > build tattoo machines, i want to make the frames out of cast iron
                                  but
                                  > > have no idea how to start, so hear i am. i've heard everthing
                                  > > from "you need a centrigal casting machine" to "send the plans to
                                  a
                                  > > foundry in asia and have them made dirt cheap".the frames are
                                  about
                                  > > 6oz of iron, any help would be awesome thanks in advance
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > Dave
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > For discussion of Metal Casting and related issues
                                  > > this list does not accept attachments.
                                  > >
                                  > > Files area and list services are at:
                                  > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
                                  > >
                                  > > For additional files and photos and off topic discussions
                                  > > check out these two affiliated sites:
                                  > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sandcrabs
                                  > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hobbicast1
                                  > >
                                  > > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
                                  > > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
                                  > >
                                  > > List Owner:
                                  > > owly@t...
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • David Painter
                                  Hello! My name is Dave Painter. I joined the group a while ago and have been lurking and soaking up information. I m interested in casting aluminum. Zamack,
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Feb 13, 2014

                                    Hello!  My name is Dave Painter. I joined the group a while ago and have been lurking and soaking up information. I’m interested in casting aluminum. Zamack, and brass primarily to support classic car restorations. I’m retired and haven’t cast anything since Junior High school shop class.  I live in Northern Virginia about half way between Winchester and Leesburg and I’m wondering if there are any experienced group members relatively close by who would be willing to let me visit their shop and observer their next casting session?

                                     

                                    Thanks,

                                    Dave

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