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foundry

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  • Joe
    Hello all. Today, I had to attend a class, for work, at the depot, so during a break I wandered across the tracks to the ACME foundry to snoop and peek in the
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2001
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      Hello all. Today, I had to attend a class, for work, at the depot,
      so during a break I wandered across the tracks to the ACME foundry to
      snoop and peek in the door. This place is not real large. About half
      a city block, altogether.
      They have a big gantry crane complete with magnet which goes back
      and forth picking up iron from about 5 different piles, brings it
      back up to a little "cable car gondola", drops it in. He does his
      thing, then this other guy in a little shack next to the car comes
      out with a scoop shovel and throws in what looks like limestone
      rock?, then some big chunks of what looks like big iron charcoal
      briquets. After this is all done, the little car starts up a big
      incline to the top of what I figure is the cupola and dumps it load,
      loudly....
      There is an overhead conveyor belt traveling up to the top of the
      cupola, delivering coke I suppose. It is covered on top and I can't
      see what's on it. The place doesn't smoke much, but I smell coal
      smoke.
      Walked over to a door where I could see molten iron pouring
      constantly, and watched. Iron in about a 2 inch stream pouring into a
      tipping ladle about 6 foot long and about 3 or so foot deep out of
      the cupola. Men with portable crucibles suspended from overhead
      tramways on electric hoists would travel past this thing, stop at the
      spout, a man at a big wheel would roll the ladle over and fill the
      crucibles one at a time, and off they would go, out of sight around a
      corner to pour, I suppose. They have hopper cars of (molding) sand
      parked right outside the door of this room, where they are unloaded
      over a conveyor. There is sand everywhere.
      This place is filthy. They always have help wanted adds in the
      paper. They go thru 'em. One time their plant belched something out
      of a stack, or something along that line, that got on all the
      vehicles in our parking lot and ate into the paint and windshields.
      Felt like sand but you couldn't see anything. Just made everything
      rough. Never would tell us what it was, just paid to get all the cars
      fixed and wanted everyone to sign some waiver afterwards.
      Glad I don't work there, but I sure want to take a tour!
    • DEATHSTARR54@AOL.COM
      Joe, You are so right, you don t want to work there. I ve done my time and it aint pretty. In the 1942 Boy Scout manual on foundry practice it says The
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 2, 2001
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        Joe,
        You are so right, you don't want to work there. I've done my time and it aint
        pretty. In the 1942 Boy Scout manual on foundry practice it says "The foundry
        is no place for weaklings. It is for men and men only". Cool!
        Steve in Spokane


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • catboat15@aol.com
        In a message dated 2/2/01 5:18:06 AM Pacific Standard Time, otei203@par1.net ... A large cast iron foundry is a great place to take your teen age son for a
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 2, 2001
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          In a message dated 2/2/01 5:18:06 AM Pacific Standard Time, otei203@...
          writes:


          > I wandered across the tracks to the ACME foundry to
          >

          A large cast iron foundry is a great place to take your teen age son for a
          tour when he tells you he wants to drop out of school to become a drummer in
          a rock band.


          John Meacham
          High Desert of California, Palmdale, Littlerock.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • LLandstrom
          It wasen t Tom H s garage was it? __________________________________________________ Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35 a year!
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 2, 2001
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            It wasen't Tom H's garage was it?

            __________________________________________________
            Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
            a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
          • oldies1955@home.com
            Lyle!~ You BOOB you told them!! Jez now I got to move!!! Had some great casting success tonight. Im getting a thermocouple to make a pyrometer also. Im
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 2, 2001
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              Lyle!~ You BOOB you told them!! Jez now I got to move!!!
              Had some great casting success tonight. Im getting a thermocouple
              to make a pyrometer also. Im starting to get it down! YAH
              Tom H.
              > It wasen't Tom H's garage was it?
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
              > a year! http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
            • Robert Rogers
              Joe, You are truly blessed to see a commercial cupola foundry in operation! People make fun of me now for pushing a pencil too hard as an engineer, but I cut
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 2, 2001
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                Joe,
                You are truly blessed to see a commercial cupola foundry in operation!
                People make fun of me now for pushing a pencil too hard as an engineer, but
                I cut my teeth on a 100 year old foundry in the late 70's. Back then we had
                12 foundries with over 8000 employees in Memphis - most using a cupola. Now
                there are three using gas for brass and aluminum, employing about 20. My
                little hobby work keeps me in touch with what I loved about the business.
                Nothing beats a hot fire on a 100 degree day.

                About the work: you started at minimum wage with a 32# sledge hammer on the
                scrap pile for 2 weeks, then you got a 25 cent raise and hoped you got moved
                soon. The rock was limestone of good purity (flux) and the charcoal was
                coke. The trolley is called a 'skip-hoist' that dumps into a 'charge door'.
                The receiving ladle is called a 'bull ladle and the others are just pouring
                ladles. The man at the bull ladle is the cupola operator and the most
                trusted employee, because he controls the magical monster that buys
                everyone's groceries. The 'conveyor' on top is the cross-over duct to the
                pollution control equipment which explains no smoke. Now, the belch! I bet
                they don't know what it was, but I bet their scrap dealer heard about it
                (God knows what was in their 'high quality' scrap) -

                Everyone who sees this for the first time describes it the same way - Hell
                on Earth. I miss it.

                Bob from Memphis, reminiscing
              • oldies1955@home.com
                Sounds interesting to VISIT... We dont have much along the lines of foundrys here (arizona) But it is about as hot in the summer! Taker easy all Tom H. ...
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 3, 2001
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                  Sounds interesting to VISIT... We dont have much along the lines of
                  foundrys here (arizona) But it is about as hot in the summer!
                  Taker easy all
                  Tom H.
                  > You are truly blessed to see a commercial cupola foundry in
                  operation!
                  > People make fun of me now for pushing a pencil too hard as an
                  engineer, but
                  > I cut my teeth on a 100 year old foundry in the late 70's. Back
                  then we had
                  > 12 foundries with over 8000 employees in Memphis - most using a
                  cupola. Now
                  > there are three using gas for brass and aluminum, employing about
                  20. My
                  > little hobby work keeps me in touch with what I loved about the
                  business.
                  > Nothing beats a hot fire on a 100 degree day.
                  >
                  > About the work: you started at minimum wage with a 32# sledge
                  hammer on the
                  > scrap pile for 2 weeks, then you got a 25 cent raise and hoped you
                  got moved
                  > soon. The rock was limestone of good purity (flux) and the
                  charcoal was
                  > coke. The trolley is called a 'skip-hoist' that dumps into
                  a 'charge door'.
                  > The receiving ladle is called a 'bull ladle and the others are just
                  pouring
                  > ladles. The man at the bull ladle is the cupola operator and the
                  most
                  > trusted employee, because he controls the magical monster that buys
                  > everyone's groceries. The 'conveyor' on top is the cross-over duct
                  to the
                  > pollution control equipment which explains no smoke. Now, the
                  belch! I bet
                  > they don't know what it was, but I bet their scrap dealer heard
                  about it
                  > (God knows what was in their 'high quality' scrap) -
                  >
                  > Everyone who sees this for the first time describes it the same
                  way - Hell
                  > on Earth. I miss it.
                  >
                  > Bob from Memphis, reminiscing
                • bill_collins14
                  Giving up on building the Gingery charcoal foundry.No finances
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 27, 2002
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                    Giving up on building the Gingery charcoal foundry.No finances
                  • Mark Casteel
                    Hello Bill, I m sorry to hear that you cant pursue.... so far, aside from fuel prices, this is probably the cheapest hobby Ive looked at... are you selling
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 28, 2002
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                      Hello Bill, I'm sorry to hear that you cant pursue.... so far, aside
                      from fuel prices, this is probably the cheapest hobby Ive looked at...
                      are you selling equipment?

                      Aside from picking up a free 5 gallon bucket, and actually having to
                      buy a bag of fire clay for something like $15, its almost been free...
                      what can we help with?

                      mark

                      ps. this is sort of a renewed hobby for me, I built a gingery charcoal
                      furnace for aLMOST FREE TO start probably 10 years ago.. then I
                      realized that I needed other machine tools to work the castings into
                      anything spectacular.... THEN the evils downward spiral began.... then
                      I realized I could cast and build accessories for the machines I couldnt
                      afford...

                      bill_collins14 wrote:
                      > Giving up on building the Gingery charcoal foundry.No finances
                      >
                      >
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                      > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
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