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Re:Binder

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  • Bill MCJUNKIN
    Bogus info. . . common error. Waterglass or Water Glass is the compound mixed into refractories. Sodium silicate. Eisenglas or isenglass is/was made from fish
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2002
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      Bogus info. . . common error. Waterglass or Water Glass is the compound
      mixed into refractories. Sodium silicate.

      Eisenglas or isenglass is/was made from fish bladders, usually from
      sturgeon. It is a plastic like material and was used for carriage
      windows among other things. Plastics and the rarity of sturgeon put
      isenglas makers out of business.

      Mica which was used for stove "windows" was often call isenglass by
      people who were not familiar with the real thing. Mica is not flexible
      enough to roll up and is not eisenglas.

      Neither are used in food or beverage processing / production. Wine is
      cleared (called fining) with gelatin as is beer depending on the valence
      of the clouding agent. Bentonite (as used in green sand) is also used to
      clear wines. Gelatin has hundreds of uses in the food industry.
      Agar-agar is the seaweed product often confused with gelatin, sometimes
      labeled as "vegetable gelatin". Agar-agar is a remarkable gelatin look
      alike that is 81.29% soluble fiber and can be used to clear wine without
      adding any proteins that might result in clouding of a different nature.

      I worked 40+ years in the food industry and make pretty darn good wine
      at home. Sorry to be so windy. One of my pet peeves is errors in text
      and reference books. Errors are copied and recopied by so-called
      "authors" and "editors" and promulgated by schools and universities
      world wide.

      Bill McJ



      > Date: Sat, 31 Aug 2002 21:35:09 -0000
      > From: "twinpipe2002" <twinpipe2002@...>
      > Subject: Binder ?
      >
      > Has anyone ever tried using Isinglass as a binder? My father tells me
      > they use to mix it with clay and sand years ago for furnace linings.I
      > was wondering if it would be any good for moulding sand (used as a
      > binding agent)Apparently it has 101 uses including clearing home brew
      > wines and beers,stiffening jellies etc etc.This is a definiton of it:
      > http://www.slider.com/enc/27000/isinglass.htm
      >


      --
      Bill McJunkin N6FAB wmcjunkin@...

      http://members.telocity.com/wmcjunkin Apprentice Neanderthal
      Bernouli's law sucks!
    • twinpipe2002
      ... compound mixed into refractories. ... is cleared (called fining) with gelatin as is beer depending on the valence of the clouding agent ... wine at home.
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2002
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        --- In hobbicast@y..., Bill MCJUNKIN <wmcjunkin@t...> wrote:
        > Bogus info. . . common error. Waterglass or Water Glass is the
        compound mixed into refractories.
        > SNIP
        > Neither are used in food or beverage processing / production. Wine
        is cleared (called fining) with gelatin as is beer depending on the
        valence of the clouding agent
        >SNIP
        > I worked 40+ years in the food industry and make pretty darn good
        wine at home. Sorry to be so windy. One of my pet peeves is errors in
        text and reference books. Errors are copied and recopied by so-called
        > "authors" and "editors" and promulgated by schools and universities
        > world wide.
        >SNIP
        The Isinglass my father was talking about was definitely used in food
        processing,domestic use at least,as it cropped up in a conversation
        about his long departed aunty(who was a bit of a cook)using it to
        preserve eggs.He went on to recall them using it in the building of a
        small hardening furnace they made at the firm where he did his
        apprenticeship years ago.Definitely the same substance.
      • Daniel C. Postellon
        Waterglass (sodium silicate) was definitely used to preserve eggs. ... From: twinpipe2002 To: Sent:
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2002
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          Waterglass (sodium silicate) was definitely used to preserve eggs.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "twinpipe2002" <twinpipe2002@...>
          To: <hobbicast@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2002 5:04 AM
          Subject: [hobbicast] Re:Binder


          > --- In hobbicast@y..., Bill MCJUNKIN <wmcjunkin@t...> wrote:
          > > Bogus info. . . common error. Waterglass or Water Glass is the
          > compound mixed into refractories.
          > > SNIP
          > > Neither are used in food or beverage processing / production. Wine
          > is cleared (called fining) with gelatin as is beer depending on the
          > valence of the clouding agent
          > >SNIP
          > > I worked 40+ years in the food industry and make pretty darn good
          > wine at home. Sorry to be so windy. One of my pet peeves is errors in
          > text and reference books. Errors are copied and recopied by so-called
          > > "authors" and "editors" and promulgated by schools and universities
          > > world wide.
          > >SNIP
          > The Isinglass my father was talking about was definitely used in food
          > processing,domestic use at least,as it cropped up in a conversation
          > about his long departed aunty(who was a bit of a cook)using it to
          > preserve eggs.He went on to recall them using it in the building of a
          > small hardening furnace they made at the firm where he did his
          > apprenticeship years ago.Definitely the same substance.
          >
          >
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        • viscoyl
          ... food ... a ... I think we are talking about two completely different substances with the same name, but different properties. The Scientific American
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 1, 2002
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            > The Isinglass my father was talking about was definitely used in
            food
            > processing,domestic use at least,as it cropped up in a conversation
            > about his long departed aunty(who was a bit of a cook)using it to
            > preserve eggs.He went on to recall them using it in the building of
            a
            > small hardening furnace they made at the firm where he did his
            > apprenticeship years ago.Definitely the same substance.




            I think we are talking about two completely different substances with
            the same name, but different properties. The Scientific American
            Cyclopedia says that isinglass is a purer form of a gelatin obtained
            from the air bladders or some other membranes of fish. The commercial
            form was called "fish glue" and was widely used in the woodworking
            and printing industries at one time. I have read elsewhere, though
            don't have the reference handy, that at least one type of mica was
            also called "isinglass" and was used to make transparent, heatproof
            windows for coal stoves. There are other varities of mica for
            electrical equipment insulation, etc.
            Mike.
          • Terry Lane
            Ah! there s your answer, WATERGLASS is used to preserve eggs. Tel
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2002
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              Ah! there's your answer, WATERGLASS is used to preserve eggs.

              Tel

              >
              > > The Isinglass my father was talking about was definitely used in
              > food
              > > processing,domestic use at least,as it cropped up in a conversation
              > > about his long departed aunty(who was a bit of a cook)using it to
              > > preserve eggs.He went on to recall them using it in the building of
              > a
              > > small hardening furnace they made at the firm where he did his
              > > apprenticeship years ago.Definitely the same substance.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I think we are talking about two completely different substances with
              > the same name, but different properties. The Scientific American
              > Cyclopedia says that isinglass is a purer form of a gelatin obtained
              > from the air bladders or some other membranes of fish. The commercial
              > form was called "fish glue" and was widely used in the woodworking
              > and printing industries at one time. I have read elsewhere, though
              > don't have the reference handy, that at least one type of mica was
              > also called "isinglass" and was used to make transparent, heatproof
              > windows for coal stoves. There are other varities of mica for
              > electrical equipment insulation, etc.
              > Mike.
              >
              >
              >
              > Please visit our sponsor: Budget Casting Supply
              > http://budgetcastingsupply.com/
              >
              > Files area and list services are at:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hobbicast
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > hobbicast-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
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