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42992Re: [hobbicast] Ideas Needed

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  • StoneTool
    Feb 18, 2014
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      Dave:
          I hate to say this, but you apparently have no conception of the loads and stresses these things are subjected to.  These things are bouncing over rocks and through ditches and with water in them weigh about 20,000 lbs.   It's very different from what you imagine.  They break up from the stresses and pounding.  Where these rollers are parked, there are two others that are pretty much junk as a result of poor design......... You can only repair them so many times.   This is not Kansas or Nebraska with it's deep soft soil, it's ground that those folks couldn't even imagine farming......more rock (big rounded river rock........not gravel but the rocks the size of your head) than soil.  But it is extremely productive considering the climate and moisture.

                                                                          Howard

      On 02/18/2014 06:05 AM, Dave wrote:
      K.I.S.S. comes to mind
      Why re-engineer?
      A tractor does not go that fast when conditioning the land!
      Just get it repaired to restore functionality.
      Dave


      On Monday, February 17, 2014 10:58 PM, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:
       
      RT:
          This is not a round bale roller............ This is a gang of 3 land rollers 54" diameter 1/2" pipe, one 14' long and two 10' long.  You fill them with water and pull them across the field to push the rocks down.


                                                                                              Howard

      On 02/17/2014 08:28 PM, redlupmi2@... wrote:
      I've repaired numerous round hay baler rollers.  Some had been previous repair attempts, others were OEM designs.  A single plate unless extremely thick or gussets to the outside to prevent the end plate from flexing will fail from fatigue of the end plate flex.  I've seen a few with double plates like you are considering, their failures were from the shaft failing from chemistry change from the weld process in a poor location, and/or shaft undersize for loads. 

      But most equipment is made to sell, not last.  The repairs, keeps me employed.

      R.T.
       




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