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42859Re: [hobbicast] Re: Refractory blanket how-to for welding forges.

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  • mikey98118
    Sep 4 10:50 AM

      "You should note that, even after the rigidizer has penetrated ceramic fiber products to a desired depth, it remains somewhat porous, so adherence of the toughening layer presents no problem." Instead of "it" I should have written "they," for obviously the ceramic fiber products remain "somewhat porous"--not the water glass coating rigidizer leaves behind.
      Mikey 

      Carl,

      Neither my writing, nor your reading is faulty. I think you're just suffering a little bit of anxiety for lack of an installation plan. The folded rectangles are placed side by side through the expedience of compression on either side of two plates. One plate can be welded in place, and the other moved by means of a handle, or both plates can be moved in unison by scissors action (pinning extending handles together), or you can have a second person help you by holding one plate by its handle while you use both hands to push the second plate and place extra folded rectangles in place. The only "form" you need is supplied by the furnace or forge's steel outer shell 

      Adding rigidizer into compressed fiber blanket parts is quite simple; it still penetrates the material just fine, just not as quickly (this actually improves control of penetration depth). Ceramic fiber board is simply a highly compressed form of fiber blanket, and it accepts rigidizer just fine (but slowly compared to blanket products). Once the rigidized layer is fired and becomes permanent, the thin toughening layer is added and fired. You should note that, even after the rigidizer has penetrated ceramic fiber products to a desired depth, it remains somewhat porous, so adherence of the toughening layer presents no problem. 

      I don't have a drawing and am not set up to draw at this time (I make book drawings and take photographs all at once, over a period of months between writing text and the first edit of each book; otherwise I don't make drawings at all). You can see relevant drawings in Giberson's book, which is so full of drawings and valuable equipment building instructions that it will become a permanent part of your technical library; I wouldn't consider loaning my own copy anymore (having had to replace it twice).
      Mikey





       



















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