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32672Re: Aluminum Supply

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  • Charles
    Nov 1, 2004
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      Try this out

      http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/furnace2/furnace.html

      Notice the extremely cool lack of a crucible :)


      --- In hobbicast@yahoogroups.com, "edi malinaric" <emovi@m...> wrote:
      > > This shouldn't be too difficult of a task with a larger
      > > burner (1" or so) would probably melt a wheel in no time, now to
      > > figure out the furnace design that will accept wheels, trannies,
      etc!
      > >
      > > Cheers Gene
      >
      > Hello Gene - I was doing tonight's crossword and giving the above a
      > secondary think...
      >
      > Thoughts went something like so ... build a 24" diameter x 8" high
      furnace.
      > The bottom of the refractory is conical towards a flue-sized hole
      in the
      > centre. It's lid is 50 gallon drum lined with Fibrefrax - that's
      big enough
      > to accomodate most gearbox housings. This "pancake" furnace is
      permanently
      > mounted - high enough to allow a 20 pound propane tank furnace to
      be moved
      > underneath and to be lifted against the bottom of the 2-footer.
      (picture a
      > railed carriage with a scissors type of lifter-upper)
      >
      > Operation:
      >
      > i) place a crucible in the bottom furnace, run it under the big'un
      and raise
      > it up against it
      > ii) start warming up the crucible
      > iii) place an alloy wheel rim/gearbox housing in the upper
      furnace, put on
      > it's hat and light up it's "Mningi" burner.
      >
      > As the wheel melts, the molten aluminium runs down into the
      crucible. When
      > the donor article is nowhere to be found, lower and move the
      bottom furnace
      > to one side and pig-out or cast from the crucible.
      >
      > On second thoughts it would be safer to lift the "pancake" furnace
      and swing
      > it to one side.
      >
      > Here's a link that should be of interest - especially as winter is
      coming
      > ...
      >
      > http://www.hotart.co.za/main.htm
      >
      > The reason for posting it is that Alex, after a two to three day
      drying
      > period, applies the glaze, places those fireplaces on a plinth,
      lowers an
      > insulated 50 gallon drum over it and lets rip with the propane. I
      think he
      > said that he brings it up to 1200 C and holds it there for 8 - 10
      hours.
      >
      > OK - over to y'all - cheers edi
      >
      > (Mningi?? = larger than big, much larger!)
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