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Re: New Hmong Numbers from the 2008 American Community Survey

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  • Caleb
    Mark, I never got the chance to thank you for posting these numbers. Peculiar indeed - such a large decrease in the national numbers just doesn t add up. As
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 26, 2009
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      Mark,

      I never got the chance to thank you for posting these numbers. Peculiar indeed - such a large decrease in the national numbers just doesn't add up. As for Alaska, I know that the Anchorage Hmong population alone stands at 3,000-5,000. There are around 500 families, and Hmong students now enroll more than any other group in English Language Learners Program (Bilingual Ed.). These are not small figures, and we all know how important they are in making policy and program decisions. I would support anyone looking to write something to this point...

      Thanks Again,

      Caleb Billmeier
      Master's Candidate
      University of Alaska - Fairbanks
      Center for Cross-Cultural Studies
      907.980.2482 (Cell)
      907.345.4045 (Home)

      ftcmb4@...

      --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, Jacob Hickman <jacobrhickman@...> wrote:
      >
      > That is incredible. For any of you who have lived in Alaska, you would
      > know that there is quite a significant Asian population in Anchorage,
      > Alaska, and that there are many more Hmong than the numbers listed for
      > many states on this list.
      >
      > Mark (or anyone else), have you published a critique of these
      > numbers/methodology or seen one anywhere? If not, would you or anyone on
      > this list potentially be interested in collaborating on one?
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Jacob Hickman
      > PhD Candidate
      > Department of Comparative Human Development
      > University of Chicago
      > jhickman@...
      >
      >
      >
      > hmongcultural wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Yang:
      > >
      > > Thanks for your comment. Yes, I think we can only conclude that these
      > > numbers are seriously questionable. I have always had my doubts about
      > > the ACS but since the Hmong pops. were at least increasing every year
      > > they seemed to have something to say about demographic trends, that is
      > > until this year.
      > >
      > > The 2008 ACS Asian Alone dataset has a note that the Alaskan Asian
      > > population was too small to be included in the numbers.
      > >
      > > Mark Pfeifer
      > >
      > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
      > > <mailto:hmongstudies%40yahoogroups.com>, "Yang S. Xiong" <ysxiong07@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for sharing these numbers. It is indeed strange to see the
      > > decrease
      > > > for Hmong Alone throughout all the states. (Are there figures for
      > > Alaska?)
      > > >
      > > > (In the 2000 Census, Hmong Americans numbered about 186,000. The ACS data
      > > > suggest that, in the span of 8 years, the Hmong American population
      > > > decreased by 15,000!)
      > > >
      > > > Yang
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 1:21 PM, hmongcultural <hmongcultural@>wrote:
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > The 2008 ACS numbers were released yesterday. Alright, these are
      > > some very
      > > > > strange numbers. Population estimates of all of the major Southeast
      > > Asian
      > > > > groups are down significantly from last year and the past several
      > > years!
      > > > >
      > > > > The American Community Survey estimates have always been pretty
      > > suspect but
      > > > > this is even stranger than normal. For example, the Hmong Alone
      > > estimate in
      > > > > 2007 was 201,000, in 2008 it was 171,000. According to these
      > > estimates, the
      > > > > communities in Rhode Island and Ohio disappeared and populations
      > > decreased
      > > > > just about everywhere. I really think we are going to have to wait
      > > for the
      > > > > 2010 census for numbers we can hopefully use.
      > > > >
      > > > > Perhaps the most interesting thing in this dataset is that the
      > > estimated
      > > > > Hmong American population exceeds the Lao American population
      > > perhaps for
      > > > > the first time.
      > > > >
      > > > > The detailed "Selected Population Profiles" with the demographic
      > > and SES
      > > > > info for each group have yet to be released, hopefully they will be
      > > soon.
      > > > >
      > > > > I will post these numbers on www.hmongstudies.org when I have a chance.
      > > > >
      > > > > B02006. ASIAN ALONE BY SELECTED GROUPS - Universe: TOTAL ASIAN ALONE
      > > > > POPULATION
      > > > > Data Set: 2008 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates
      > > > >
      > > > > Vietnamese - 1,431,980
      > > > > Cambodian – 186,068
      > > > > Hmong – 171,316
      > > > > Lao - 159,347
      > > > >
      > > > > Hmong
      > > > > United States - 171,316 (+/-14,489)
      > > > > California – 65,831
      > > > > Minnesota - 45,930
      > > > > Wisconsin 31,578
      > > > > North Carolina – 8,009
      > > > > Michigan – 6,347
      > > > > Colorado – 2,049
      > > > > Kansas – 1,607
      > > > > Oklahoma – 1,281
      > > > > Arkansas - 854
      > > > > Florida – 821
      > > > > Georgia – 536
      > > > > Oregon - 443
      > > > > Missouri – 375
      > > > > Pennsylvania - 360
      > > > > New York – 207
      > > > > Nevada - 200
      > > > > Illinois – 166
      > > > > Tennessee – 148
      > > > > Texas - 136
      > > > > Iowa – 130
      > > > > Massachusetts – 100
      > > > > Louisiana - 61
      > > > > Hawaii - 52
      > > > > Arizona – 37
      > > > > Alabama – 0
      > > > > Connecticut – 0
      > > > > District of Columbia – 0
      > > > > Idaho – 0
      > > > > Indiana – 0
      > > > > Kentucky – 0
      > > > > Maryland – 0
      > > > > Nebraska – 0
      > > > > New Hampshire – 0
      > > > > Nevada – 0
      > > > > New Mexico – 0
      > > > > Ohio – 0
      > > > > Rhode Island – 0
      > > > > South Carolina – 994
      > > > > Utah – 0
      > > > > Virginia – 0
      > > > > Washington – 1,750
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • hmongcultural
      Thanks for the information from Alaska. We can only hope that the 2010 census will have better data. This latest ACS raises alot of questions about the ACS s
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks for the information from Alaska. We can only hope that the 2010 census will have better data. This latest ACS raises alot of questions about the ACS's suitability for usage in research.

        Mark Pfeifer

        --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "Caleb" <cbill8lc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mark,
        >
        > I never got the chance to thank you for posting these numbers. Peculiar indeed - such a large decrease in the national numbers just doesn't add up. As for Alaska, I know that the Anchorage Hmong population alone stands at 3,000-5,000. There are around 500 families, and Hmong students now enroll more than any other group in English Language Learners Program (Bilingual Ed.). These are not small figures, and we all know how important they are in making policy and program decisions. I would support anyone looking to write something to this point...
        >
        > Thanks Again,
        >
        > Caleb Billmeier
        > Master's Candidate
        > University of Alaska - Fairbanks
        > Center for Cross-Cultural Studies
        > 907.980.2482 (Cell)
        > 907.345.4045 (Home)
        >
        > ftcmb4@...
        >
        > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, Jacob Hickman <jacobrhickman@> wrote:
        > >
        > > That is incredible. For any of you who have lived in Alaska, you would
        > > know that there is quite a significant Asian population in Anchorage,
        > > Alaska, and that there are many more Hmong than the numbers listed for
        > > many states on this list.
        > >
        > > Mark (or anyone else), have you published a critique of these
        > > numbers/methodology or seen one anywhere? If not, would you or anyone on
        > > this list potentially be interested in collaborating on one?
        > >
        > > Best,
        > >
        > > Jacob Hickman
        > > PhD Candidate
        > > Department of Comparative Human Development
        > > University of Chicago
        > > jhickman@
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > hmongcultural wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yang:
        > > >
        > > > Thanks for your comment. Yes, I think we can only conclude that these
        > > > numbers are seriously questionable. I have always had my doubts about
        > > > the ACS but since the Hmong pops. were at least increasing every year
        > > > they seemed to have something to say about demographic trends, that is
        > > > until this year.
        > > >
        > > > The 2008 ACS Asian Alone dataset has a note that the Alaskan Asian
        > > > population was too small to be included in the numbers.
        > > >
        > > > Mark Pfeifer
        > > >
        > > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
        > > > <mailto:hmongstudies%40yahoogroups.com>, "Yang S. Xiong" <ysxiong07@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Thanks for sharing these numbers. It is indeed strange to see the
        > > > decrease
        > > > > for Hmong Alone throughout all the states. (Are there figures for
        > > > Alaska?)
        > > > >
        > > > > (In the 2000 Census, Hmong Americans numbered about 186,000. The ACS data
        > > > > suggest that, in the span of 8 years, the Hmong American population
        > > > > decreased by 15,000!)
        > > > >
        > > > > Yang
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 1:21 PM, hmongcultural <hmongcultural@>wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > The 2008 ACS numbers were released yesterday. Alright, these are
        > > > some very
        > > > > > strange numbers. Population estimates of all of the major Southeast
        > > > Asian
        > > > > > groups are down significantly from last year and the past several
        > > > years!
        > > > > >
        > > > > > The American Community Survey estimates have always been pretty
        > > > suspect but
        > > > > > this is even stranger than normal. For example, the Hmong Alone
        > > > estimate in
        > > > > > 2007 was 201,000, in 2008 it was 171,000. According to these
        > > > estimates, the
        > > > > > communities in Rhode Island and Ohio disappeared and populations
        > > > decreased
        > > > > > just about everywhere. I really think we are going to have to wait
        > > > for the
        > > > > > 2010 census for numbers we can hopefully use.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Perhaps the most interesting thing in this dataset is that the
        > > > estimated
        > > > > > Hmong American population exceeds the Lao American population
        > > > perhaps for
        > > > > > the first time.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > The detailed "Selected Population Profiles" with the demographic
        > > > and SES
        > > > > > info for each group have yet to be released, hopefully they will be
        > > > soon.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I will post these numbers on www.hmongstudies.org when I have a chance.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > B02006. ASIAN ALONE BY SELECTED GROUPS - Universe: TOTAL ASIAN ALONE
        > > > > > POPULATION
        > > > > > Data Set: 2008 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Vietnamese - 1,431,980
        > > > > > Cambodian – 186,068
        > > > > > Hmong – 171,316
        > > > > > Lao - 159,347
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Hmong
        > > > > > United States - 171,316 (+/-14,489)
        > > > > > California – 65,831
        > > > > > Minnesota - 45,930
        > > > > > Wisconsin 31,578
        > > > > > North Carolina – 8,009
        > > > > > Michigan – 6,347
        > > > > > Colorado – 2,049
        > > > > > Kansas – 1,607
        > > > > > Oklahoma – 1,281
        > > > > > Arkansas - 854
        > > > > > Florida – 821
        > > > > > Georgia – 536
        > > > > > Oregon - 443
        > > > > > Missouri – 375
        > > > > > Pennsylvania - 360
        > > > > > New York – 207
        > > > > > Nevada - 200
        > > > > > Illinois – 166
        > > > > > Tennessee – 148
        > > > > > Texas - 136
        > > > > > Iowa – 130
        > > > > > Massachusetts – 100
        > > > > > Louisiana - 61
        > > > > > Hawaii - 52
        > > > > > Arizona – 37
        > > > > > Alabama – 0
        > > > > > Connecticut – 0
        > > > > > District of Columbia – 0
        > > > > > Idaho – 0
        > > > > > Indiana – 0
        > > > > > Kentucky – 0
        > > > > > Maryland – 0
        > > > > > Nebraska – 0
        > > > > > New Hampshire – 0
        > > > > > Nevada – 0
        > > > > > New Mexico – 0
        > > > > > Ohio – 0
        > > > > > Rhode Island – 0
        > > > > > South Carolina – 994
        > > > > > Utah – 0
        > > > > > Virginia – 0
        > > > > > Washington – 1,750
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • souavang6999
        ... My father-in-law s church has 900 members (hmong only) in Georgia. There is another smaller church and lot of non-Hmong in Georgia. GA has over 3,000
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 28, 2009
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          --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "hmongcultural" <hmongcultural@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for the information from Alaska. We can only hope that the 2010 census will have better data. This latest ACS raises alot of questions about the ACS's suitability for usage in research.
          >
          > Mark Pfeifer
          >
          > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "Caleb" <cbill8lc@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Mark,
          > >
          > > I never got the chance to thank you for posting these numbers. Peculiar indeed - such a large decrease in the national numbers just doesn't add up. As for Alaska, I know that the Anchorage Hmong population alone stands at 3,000-5,000. There are around 500 families, and Hmong students now enroll more than any other group in English Language Learners Program (Bilingual Ed.). These are not small figures, and we all know how important they are in making policy and program decisions. I would support anyone looking to write something to this point...
          > >
          > > Thanks Again,
          > >
          > > Caleb Billmeier
          > > Master's Candidate
          > > University of Alaska - Fairbanks
          > > Center for Cross-Cultural Studies
          > > 907.980.2482 (Cell)
          > > 907.345.4045 (Home)
          > >
          > > ftcmb4@
          > >
          > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, Jacob Hickman <jacobrhickman@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > That is incredible. For any of you who have lived in Alaska, you would
          > > > know that there is quite a significant Asian population in Anchorage,
          > > > Alaska, and that there are many more Hmong than the numbers listed for
          > > > many states on this list.
          > > >
          > > > Mark (or anyone else), have you published a critique of these
          > > > numbers/methodology or seen one anywhere? If not, would you or anyone on
          > > > this list potentially be interested in collaborating on one?
          > > >
          > > > Best,
          > > >
          > > > Jacob Hickman
          > > > PhD Candidate
          > > > Department of Comparative Human Development
          > > > University of Chicago
          > > > jhickman@
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > hmongcultural wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Yang:
          > > > >
          > > > > Thanks for your comment. Yes, I think we can only conclude that these
          > > > > numbers are seriously questionable. I have always had my doubts about
          > > > > the ACS but since the Hmong pops. were at least increasing every year
          > > > > they seemed to have something to say about demographic trends, that is
          > > > > until this year.
          > > > >
          > > > > The 2008 ACS Asian Alone dataset has a note that the Alaskan Asian
          > > > > population was too small to be included in the numbers.
          > > > >
          > > > > Mark Pfeifer
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > <mailto:hmongstudies%40yahoogroups.com>, "Yang S. Xiong" <ysxiong07@>
          > > > > wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Thanks for sharing these numbers. It is indeed strange to see the
          > > > > decrease
          > > > > > for Hmong Alone throughout all the states. (Are there figures for
          > > > > Alaska?)
          > > > > >
          > > > > > (In the 2000 Census, Hmong Americans numbered about 186,000. The ACS data
          > > > > > suggest that, in the span of 8 years, the Hmong American population
          > > > > > decreased by 15,000!)
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Yang
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 1:21 PM, hmongcultural <hmongcultural@>wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > The 2008 ACS numbers were released yesterday. Alright, these are
          > > > > some very
          > > > > > > strange numbers. Population estimates of all of the major Southeast
          > > > > Asian
          > > > > > > groups are down significantly from last year and the past several
          > > > > years!
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > The American Community Survey estimates have always been pretty
          > > > > suspect but
          > > > > > > this is even stranger than normal. For example, the Hmong Alone
          > > > > estimate in
          > > > > > > 2007 was 201,000, in 2008 it was 171,000. According to these
          > > > > estimates, the
          > > > > > > communities in Rhode Island and Ohio disappeared and populations
          > > > > decreased
          > > > > > > just about everywhere. I really think we are going to have to wait
          > > > > for the
          > > > > > > 2010 census for numbers we can hopefully use.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Perhaps the most interesting thing in this dataset is that the
          > > > > estimated
          > > > > > > Hmong American population exceeds the Lao American population
          > > > > perhaps for
          > > > > > > the first time.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > The detailed "Selected Population Profiles" with the demographic
          > > > > and SES
          > > > > > > info for each group have yet to be released, hopefully they will be
          > > > > soon.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > I will post these numbers on www.hmongstudies.org when I have a chance.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > B02006. ASIAN ALONE BY SELECTED GROUPS - Universe: TOTAL ASIAN ALONE
          > > > > > > POPULATION
          > > > > > > Data Set: 2008 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Vietnamese - 1,431,980
          > > > > > > Cambodian – 186,068
          > > > > > > Hmong – 171,316
          > > > > > > Lao - 159,347
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Hmong
          > > > > > > United States - 171,316 (+/-14,489)
          > > > > > > California – 65,831
          > > > > > > Minnesota - 45,930
          > > > > > > Wisconsin 31,578
          > > > > > > North Carolina – 8,009
          > > > > > > Michigan – 6,347
          > > > > > > Colorado – 2,049
          > > > > > > Kansas – 1,607
          > > > > > > Oklahoma – 1,281
          > > > > > > Arkansas - 854
          > > > > > > Florida – 821
          > > > > > > Georgia – 536
          > > > > > > Oregon - 443
          > > > > > > Missouri – 375
          > > > > > > Pennsylvania - 360
          > > > > > > New York – 207
          > > > > > > Nevada - 200
          > > > > > > Illinois – 166
          > > > > > > Tennessee – 148
          > > > > > > Texas - 136
          > > > > > > Iowa – 130
          > > > > > > Massachusetts – 100
          > > > > > > Louisiana - 61
          > > > > > > Hawaii - 52
          > > > > > > Arizona – 37
          > > > > > > Alabama – 0
          > > > > > > Connecticut – 0
          > > > > > > District of Columbia – 0
          > > > > > > Idaho – 0
          > > > > > > Indiana – 0
          > > > > > > Kentucky – 0
          > > > > > > Maryland – 0
          > > > > > > Nebraska – 0
          > > > > > > New Hampshire – 0
          > > > > > > Nevada – 0
          > > > > > > New Mexico – 0
          > > > > > > Ohio – 0
          > > > > > > Rhode Island – 0
          > > > > > > South Carolina – 994
          > > > > > > Utah – 0
          > > > > > > Virginia – 0
          > > > > > > Washington – 1,750
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
          My father-in-law's church has 900 members (hmong only) in Georgia. There is another smaller church and lot of non-Hmong in Georgia. GA has over 3,000 Hmong people. My uncle's in-law and brother-in-law lived in Rhode Island for about 30 years and there are about 500 Hmong living there. Just want to share the info.
        • sir_ken_g2001
          There was a recent Tulsa World Ok article about a Hmong festival - where it was said that there were 5000 in the Tulsa area.
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 31, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            There was a recent Tulsa World Ok article about a Hmong festival - where it was said that there were 5000 in the Tulsa area.

            --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "souavang6999" <souavang6999@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "hmongcultural" <hmongcultural@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Thanks for the information from Alaska. We can only hope that the 2010 census will have better data. This latest ACS raises alot of questions about the ACS's suitability for usage in research.
            > >
            > > Mark Pfeifer
            > >
            > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "Caleb" <cbill8lc@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Mark,
            > > >
            > > > I never got the chance to thank you for posting these numbers. Peculiar indeed - such a large decrease in the national numbers just doesn't add up. As for Alaska, I know that the Anchorage Hmong population alone stands at 3,000-5,000. There are around 500 families, and Hmong students now enroll more than any other group in English Language Learners Program (Bilingual Ed.). These are not small figures, and we all know how important they are in making policy and program decisions. I would support anyone looking to write something to this point...
            > > >
            > > > Thanks Again,
            > > >
            > > > Caleb Billmeier
            > > > Master's Candidate
            > > > University of Alaska - Fairbanks
            > > > Center for Cross-Cultural Studies
            > > > 907.980.2482 (Cell)
            > > > 907.345.4045 (Home)
            > > >
            > > > ftcmb4@
            > > >
            > > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, Jacob Hickman <jacobrhickman@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > That is incredible. For any of you who have lived in Alaska, you would
            > > > > know that there is quite a significant Asian population in Anchorage,
            > > > > Alaska, and that there are many more Hmong than the numbers listed for
            > > > > many states on this list.
            > > > >
            > > > > Mark (or anyone else), have you published a critique of these
            > > > > numbers/methodology or seen one anywhere? If not, would you or anyone on
            > > > > this list potentially be interested in collaborating on one?
            > > > >
            > > > > Best,
            > > > >
            > > > > Jacob Hickman
            > > > > PhD Candidate
            > > > > Department of Comparative Human Development
            > > > > University of Chicago
            > > > > jhickman@
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > hmongcultural wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Yang:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Thanks for your comment. Yes, I think we can only conclude that these
            > > > > > numbers are seriously questionable. I have always had my doubts about
            > > > > > the ACS but since the Hmong pops. were at least increasing every year
            > > > > > they seemed to have something to say about demographic trends, that is
            > > > > > until this year.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > The 2008 ACS Asian Alone dataset has a note that the Alaskan Asian
            > > > > > population was too small to be included in the numbers.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Mark Pfeifer
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
            > > > > > <mailto:hmongstudies%40yahoogroups.com>, "Yang S. Xiong" <ysxiong07@>
            > > > > > wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Thanks for sharing these numbers. It is indeed strange to see the
            > > > > > decrease
            > > > > > > for Hmong Alone throughout all the states. (Are there figures for
            > > > > > Alaska?)
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > (In the 2000 Census, Hmong Americans numbered about 186,000. The ACS data
            > > > > > > suggest that, in the span of 8 years, the Hmong American population
            > > > > > > decreased by 15,000!)
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Yang
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 1:21 PM, hmongcultural <hmongcultural@>wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > The 2008 ACS numbers were released yesterday. Alright, these are
            > > > > > some very
            > > > > > > > strange numbers. Population estimates of all of the major Southeast
            > > > > > Asian
            > > > > > > > groups are down significantly from last year and the past several
            > > > > > years!
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > The American Community Survey estimates have always been pretty
            > > > > > suspect but
            > > > > > > > this is even stranger than normal. For example, the Hmong Alone
            > > > > > estimate in
            > > > > > > > 2007 was 201,000, in 2008 it was 171,000. According to these
            > > > > > estimates, the
            > > > > > > > communities in Rhode Island and Ohio disappeared and populations
            > > > > > decreased
            > > > > > > > just about everywhere. I really think we are going to have to wait
            > > > > > for the
            > > > > > > > 2010 census for numbers we can hopefully use.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Perhaps the most interesting thing in this dataset is that the
            > > > > > estimated
            > > > > > > > Hmong American population exceeds the Lao American population
            > > > > > perhaps for
            > > > > > > > the first time.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > The detailed "Selected Population Profiles" with the demographic
            > > > > > and SES
            > > > > > > > info for each group have yet to be released, hopefully they will be
            > > > > > soon.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > I will post these numbers on www.hmongstudies.org when I have a chance.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > B02006. ASIAN ALONE BY SELECTED GROUPS - Universe: TOTAL ASIAN ALONE
            > > > > > > > POPULATION
            > > > > > > > Data Set: 2008 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Vietnamese - 1,431,980
            > > > > > > > Cambodian – 186,068
            > > > > > > > Hmong – 171,316
            > > > > > > > Lao - 159,347
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Hmong
            > > > > > > > United States - 171,316 (+/-14,489)
            > > > > > > > California – 65,831
            > > > > > > > Minnesota - 45,930
            > > > > > > > Wisconsin 31,578
            > > > > > > > North Carolina – 8,009
            > > > > > > > Michigan – 6,347
            > > > > > > > Colorado – 2,049
            > > > > > > > Kansas – 1,607
            > > > > > > > Oklahoma – 1,281
            > > > > > > > Arkansas - 854
            > > > > > > > Florida – 821
            > > > > > > > Georgia – 536
            > > > > > > > Oregon - 443
            > > > > > > > Missouri – 375
            > > > > > > > Pennsylvania - 360
            > > > > > > > New York – 207
            > > > > > > > Nevada - 200
            > > > > > > > Illinois – 166
            > > > > > > > Tennessee – 148
            > > > > > > > Texas - 136
            > > > > > > > Iowa – 130
            > > > > > > > Massachusetts – 100
            > > > > > > > Louisiana - 61
            > > > > > > > Hawaii - 52
            > > > > > > > Arizona – 37
            > > > > > > > Alabama – 0
            > > > > > > > Connecticut – 0
            > > > > > > > District of Columbia – 0
            > > > > > > > Idaho – 0
            > > > > > > > Indiana – 0
            > > > > > > > Kentucky – 0
            > > > > > > > Maryland – 0
            > > > > > > > Nebraska – 0
            > > > > > > > New Hampshire – 0
            > > > > > > > Nevada – 0
            > > > > > > > New Mexico – 0
            > > > > > > > Ohio – 0
            > > > > > > > Rhode Island – 0
            > > > > > > > South Carolina – 994
            > > > > > > > Utah – 0
            > > > > > > > Virginia – 0
            > > > > > > > Washington – 1,750
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > My father-in-law's church has 900 members (hmong only) in Georgia. There is another smaller church and lot of non-Hmong in Georgia. GA has over 3,000 Hmong people. My uncle's in-law and brother-in-law lived in Rhode Island for about 30 years and there are about 500 Hmong living there. Just want to share the info.
            >
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