Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

hmong came from china???

Expand Messages
  • w_soden
    I work in Guangdong, just north of Hong Kong. It is a common belief that the Hmong fled the communist party s army in the 1950 s. But I am not able to comfirm
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 20, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I work in Guangdong, just north of Hong Kong.
      It is a common belief that the Hmong fled the
      communist party's army in the 1950's. But I am
      not able to comfirm his.

      Do you know anything about this subject????

      walter.sodem@...
    • hmongcultural
      Walter: This is an interesting, historical research question, if anyone has any information please feel free to post. I have not really seen reference to these
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 22, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Walter:

        This is an interesting, historical research question, if anyone has
        any information please feel free to post. I have not really seen
        reference to these events in English language sources.

        Mark


        --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "w_soden" <w_soden@y...> wrote:
        > I work in Guangdong, just north of Hong Kong.
        > It is a common belief that the Hmong fled the
        > communist party's army in the 1950's. But I am
        > not able to comfirm his.
        >
        > Do you know anything about this subject????
        >
        > walter.sodem@g...
      • rayhutchison1
        Walter, and others, The Hmong originated in China, and while there may been some conflict during the formation of the communist Chinese state in 1948 (there
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 21, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Walter, and others,

          The Hmong originated in China, and while there may been some conflict
          during the formation of the communist Chinese state in 1948 (there
          had been conflict with earlier Chinese governments), this did not
          result in any mass movement out of China, where millions of Hmong
          still live (obviously the largest Hmong community in the world).

          More information:

          There is evidence of the Hmong along the Yellow and Yangtze River
          plains in central China between 2700 and 2300 BC, after which they
          moved into the central plains. The Hmong kingdoms in this area were
          recognized by the Chinese emperors and held titles of nobility
          (documentary evidence). There was conflict with the Ming (1370s) and
          Manchu (1640s) Dynasties and an unsuccessful rebellion against the
          imperial Chinese state in 1735-1740, another in 1795-1806, and
          another in 1855-1872 after which thousands of Hmong entered the
          Vietnamese highlands. Three of the clans (Lo, Ly, and Mua) went
          further west and settled in Non Het. The clans would later split
          over conflict with the Frnech colonial government following the War
          of Pa Tchai (1919-1922)... some supporting the French, others
          opposing them.

          At present the Hmong are the the sixth largest nationality group in
          China (more than 5,000,000 in the southern and southwestern
          provinces, heaviest concentration in Guizhow) and there are some
          250,000 Hmong still living in Laos.

          Louisa Schein had a chapter on "The Miao in contemporary China" in
          Hendricks, Downing, and Deinard, The Hmong in Transition (Center for
          Migration Studies, 1986).

          There is good historical information on the above topic in William
          Geddes, Migrants of the Mountains (Oxford, 1976) and also WIlliam
          McCoy, The Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asian (Harper and Row,
          1972) as well as other sources. You can also check the China census
          data for more recent info, I am not certain if the 1982 census of
          ethnic populations that gives the 5,000,000 figure has been updated.

          Above information from background section in 'Acculturation in the
          Hmong Community'

          Ray Hutchison
          UW-Green Bay

          --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "hmongcultural"
          <hmongcultural@y...> wrote:
          > Walter:
          >
          > This is an interesting, historical research question, if anyone has
          > any information please feel free to post. I have not really seen
          > reference to these events in English language sources.
          >
          > Mark
          >
          >
          > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "w_soden" <w_soden@y...> wrote:
          > > I work in Guangdong, just north of Hong Kong.
          > > It is a common belief that the Hmong fled the
          > > communist party's army in the 1950's. But I am
          > > not able to comfirm his.
          > >
          > > Do you know anything about this subject????
          > >
          > > walter.sodem@g...
        • hmongcultural
          Professor Hutchinson: Thank you for posting this very informative message. - Mark Pfeifer ... conflict ... were ... and ... for ... census ... has
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 26, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Professor Hutchinson:

            Thank you for posting this very informative message.

            - Mark Pfeifer


            --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "rayhutchison1"
            <rayhutchison1@y...> wrote:
            > Walter, and others,
            >
            > The Hmong originated in China, and while there may been some
            conflict
            > during the formation of the communist Chinese state in 1948 (there
            > had been conflict with earlier Chinese governments), this did not
            > result in any mass movement out of China, where millions of Hmong
            > still live (obviously the largest Hmong community in the world).
            >
            > More information:
            >
            > There is evidence of the Hmong along the Yellow and Yangtze River
            > plains in central China between 2700 and 2300 BC, after which they
            > moved into the central plains. The Hmong kingdoms in this area
            were
            > recognized by the Chinese emperors and held titles of nobility
            > (documentary evidence). There was conflict with the Ming (1370s)
            and
            > Manchu (1640s) Dynasties and an unsuccessful rebellion against the
            > imperial Chinese state in 1735-1740, another in 1795-1806, and
            > another in 1855-1872 after which thousands of Hmong entered the
            > Vietnamese highlands. Three of the clans (Lo, Ly, and Mua) went
            > further west and settled in Non Het. The clans would later split
            > over conflict with the Frnech colonial government following the War
            > of Pa Tchai (1919-1922)... some supporting the French, others
            > opposing them.
            >
            > At present the Hmong are the the sixth largest nationality group in
            > China (more than 5,000,000 in the southern and southwestern
            > provinces, heaviest concentration in Guizhow) and there are some
            > 250,000 Hmong still living in Laos.
            >
            > Louisa Schein had a chapter on "The Miao in contemporary China" in
            > Hendricks, Downing, and Deinard, The Hmong in Transition (Center
            for
            > Migration Studies, 1986).
            >
            > There is good historical information on the above topic in William
            > Geddes, Migrants of the Mountains (Oxford, 1976) and also WIlliam
            > McCoy, The Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asian (Harper and Row,
            > 1972) as well as other sources. You can also check the China
            census
            > data for more recent info, I am not certain if the 1982 census of
            > ethnic populations that gives the 5,000,000 figure has been updated.
            >
            > Above information from background section in 'Acculturation in the
            > Hmong Community'
            >
            > Ray Hutchison
            > UW-Green Bay
            >
            > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "hmongcultural"
            > <hmongcultural@y...> wrote:
            > > Walter:
            > >
            > > This is an interesting, historical research question, if anyone
            has
            > > any information please feel free to post. I have not really seen
            > > reference to these events in English language sources.
            > >
            > > Mark
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "w_soden" <w_soden@y...>
            wrote:
            > > > I work in Guangdong, just north of Hong Kong.
            > > > It is a common belief that the Hmong fled the
            > > > communist party's army in the 1950's. But I am
            > > > not able to comfirm his.
            > > >
            > > > Do you know anything about this subject????
            > > >
            > > > walter.sodem@g...
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.