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Re: [hmongstudies] Hmong State Population Estimates 2007 American Community Survey

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  • Sisnab
    Dear Colleagues:   I am pleased to announce the first publication of the Center for Hmong Studies, The Impact of Globalism and Trans-nationalism on the Hmong;
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 27, 2009

      Dear Colleagues:

       

      I am pleased to announce the first publication of the Center for Hmong Studies, The Impact of Globalism and Trans-nationalism on the Hmong; Selected Papers from the First International Conference on Hmong Studies.

       

      Since its inception almost five years ago, the Center for Hmong Studies at Concordia University has launched two International Conference on Hmong Studies, hosted more than ten lectures related to the field of Hmong studies, co-produced two film documentaries about the Hmong experiences, initiated a minor in Hmong studies, and hosted Dr. Gary Yia Lee of Australia as our first Scholar-In-Residence and Professor Long Yu-Xiao of Guizhou University as our Fulbright Scholar.  The Center has also signed two Memorandum of Understandings between Guizhou University and Guizhou University for Nationalities.  The MOU opened ways for the Center and these two institutions of higher learning in China to collaborate in the areas of student and scholar exchanges, joint research and publications as well as conference planning.  We have also hosted two trips for students and community members to China .  

       

      The Center for Hmong Studies also maintains a significant library, artifacts and archival collection.  To learn more about the Center for Hmong Studies, please log onto our website at www.csp.edu/hmongcenter.

      We are proud of the fact that within a short period of time, we have already made some progress.  There’s still more things to do, but I thought you may want to celebrate our latest milestone.  

       

       

       

      Table of Contents

      Preface

      by Lee Pao Xiong..................................................................................................1

      Animal Sacrifice and Social Meanings in Hmong American Funerals

      by Vincent K. Her, Ph.D. .....................................................................................3

      Effects of Globalization on Hmong Children’s Health in a Thailand Village

      by Kathleen A. Culhane-Pera, MD, MA.............................................................13

      The Thai-Hmong and Hmong Refugees in Thailand : The Politics of Human Rights

      by Lee Lor, MA..................................................................................................31

      Leadership Development: A Critical Component to Advancing Hmong Society in the United States

      by Mai Moua , PH.D...........................................................................................41

      Hmong Culture is Hmong Soul

      by Yang Dao, Ph.D.............................................................................................53

      Lug Hmoob Ntuj Nrau Tej Lug Ntawv Txais Lug Suav

      Tswv Yob Xyooj thiab Sua Yaaj Kunming, China .................................................57

      Chinese Loan Words Used in the Hmong Diaspora

      by Chue Yo Xiong and Shua Yang.......................................................................61

      Ethnic Culture Presentation Coordinated by government and folks in China

      by Prof. Yang Zhengwen.....................................................................................65

      The Experience of Hmong Americans: Three Decades in Retrospective Review

      by Kou Yang, Ed.D.............................................................................................79

      The Hmong Mountains : Space and Culture in Northern Thailand

      by Dr. Maren Tomforde .....................................................................................95

      Transnational Space and Social Memories: Why the Hmong in the Diaspora Cannot Forget Laos ?

      by Gary Yia Lee, Ph. D.....................................................................................121

       

       

      Lee Pao Xiong

      Director

      Center for Hmong Studies

      Concordia University ,  St. Paul

      275 North Syndicate Street

      St. Paul, Minnesota 55104

      651-641-8870

       

      www.csp.edu/hmongcenter

       




      From: hmongcultural <hmongcultural@...>
      To: hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, February 20, 2009 10:32:08 AM
      Subject: [hmongstudies] Hmong State Population Estimates 2007 American Community Survey

      This data was released last Fall but I just got around to compiling it for another project. Compared to the decennial census, the ACS doesn't seem to do such a good job of counting Hmong populations in states where the population isn't very large. I think the numbers are better for the states with the larger populations. A few years ago, Kansas came up with no Hmong which we knew was a mistake but now the estimate is 2600 Hmong there. Other states with increases in this year's estimates are Arkansas, Oklahoma and North Carolina along with Minnesota and California, the estimates were down slightly for Wisconsin. I have also posted a link to the detailed sociodemographic data from the 2007 ACS on this site.

      http://www.hmongstu dies.org/ 2007SEAAmericanC ommunitySurvey. html

      Mark Pfeifer

       


    • hmongcultural
      I would like to congratulate Lee Pao Xiong and the Center for Hmong Studies on this very noteworthy new publication, I look forward to viewing it and reading
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2009
        I would like to congratulate Lee Pao Xiong and the Center for Hmong Studies on this very noteworthy new publication, I look forward to viewing it and reading the important scholarly studies that are part of it. I would also like to congratulate the Center for Hmong Studies on its many achievements including the conferences it has held the past few years.

        I saw the section of the e-mail though about the center's library, artifacts and archival collection in the message and was moved to comment.

        I hope that the center will focus its important efforts on teaching and scholarship. There are two excellent and well-established library and archival collections within 2-3 miles of Concordia in Saint Paul.

        The Hmong Resource Center Library at the Hmong Cultural Center
        http://www.hmonglibrary.org/

        The Hmong Archives (formerly located at Concordia and now above Hmong ABC Bookstore) in Saint Paul
        http://www.hmongarchives.org/

        Alot of resources and labor have gone into developing these unique and very special collections over the past decade, it would be shame if in a time of fiscal scarcity and cutbacks in funding from foundations, if resources were directed toward building yet another library and/or archival collection in Saint Paul.

        Several years ago, when Concordia was talking about developing a Center for Hmong Studies, Rev. Kou Seying Thao, the former Hmong programs coordinator at Concordia approached me to write a letter of support to several foundations in order for the center to receive startup funding. I was very pleased to do this because I appreciated what I heard from Concordia about not duplicating existing programs but rather working with them in a cohesive manner to promote Hmong Studies. I believe the Teaching and Research role are very important niches for the Center for Hmong Studies. There are, however excellent existing library and archival collections at non-profits in Minnesota that can serve scholars, students and community members seeking resources for research.

        I do believe however, that there is a great need for collections in parts of the country where resources are not in such abundance - places like Wisconsin, North Carolina, Michigan, California and Arkansas. This is why I was pleased to see that a small Hmong resource center has recently opened on the UW-La Crosse campus.

        http://www.uwlax.edu/cdcr/resourcecenter.htm

        Thanks for letting me put in my two cents.

        - Mark Pfeifer


        --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, Sisnab <sisnab2002@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Colleagues:
        >  
        > I am pleased to announce the first publication of the Center for Hmong Studies, The Impact of Globalism and Trans-nationalism on the Hmong; Selected Papers from the First International Conference on Hmong Studies.
        >  
        > Since its inception almost five years ago, the Center for Hmong Studies at Concordia University has launched two International Conference on Hmong Studies, hosted more than ten lectures related to the field of Hmong studies, co-produced two film documentaries about the Hmong experiences, initiated a minor in Hmong studies, and hosted Dr. Gary Yia Lee of Australia as our first Scholar-In-Residence and Professor Long Yu-Xiao of Guizhou University as our Fulbright Scholar.  The Center has also signed two Memorandum of Understandings between Guizhou University and Guizhou University for Nationalities.  The MOU opened ways for the Center and these two institutions of higher learning in China to collaborate in the areas of student and scholar exchanges, joint research and publications as well as conference planning.  We have also hosted two trips for students and community members to China.  
        >  
        > The Center for Hmong Studies also maintains a significant library, artifacts and archival collection.  To learn more about the Center for Hmong Studies, please log onto our website at www.csp.edu/hmongcenter.
        > We are proud of the fact that within a short period of time, we have already made some progress.  There’s still more things to do, but I thought you may want to celebrate our latest milestone.  
        >  
        >  
        >  
        > Table of Contents
        > Preface
        > by Lee Pao Xiong..................................................................................................1
        > Animal Sacrifice and Social Meanings in Hmong American Funerals
        > by Vincent K. Her, Ph.D. .....................................................................................3
        > Effects of Globalization on Hmong Children’s Health in a Thailand Village
        > by Kathleen A. Culhane-Pera, MD, MA.............................................................13
        > The Thai-Hmong and Hmong Refugees in Thailand: The Politics of Human Rights
        > by Lee Lor, MA..................................................................................................31
        > Leadership Development: A Critical Component to Advancing Hmong Society in the United States
        > by Mai Moua, PH.D...........................................................................................41
        > Hmong Culture is Hmong Soul
        > by Yang Dao, Ph.D.............................................................................................53
        > Lug Hmoob Ntuj Nrau Tej Lug Ntawv Txais Lug Suav
        > Tswv Yob Xyooj thiab Sua Yaaj Kunming, China.................................................57
        > Chinese Loan Words Used in the Hmong Diaspora
        > by Chue Yo Xiong and Shua Yang.......................................................................61
        > Ethnic Culture Presentation Coordinated by government and folks in China
        > by Prof. Yang Zhengwen.....................................................................................65
        > The Experience of Hmong Americans: Three Decades in Retrospective Review
        > by Kou Yang, Ed.D.............................................................................................79
        > The Hmong Mountains: Space and Culture in Northern Thailand
        > by Dr. Maren Tomforde .....................................................................................95
        > Transnational Space and Social Memories: Why the Hmong in the Diaspora Cannot Forget Laos?
        > by Gary Yia Lee, Ph. D.....................................................................................121
        >  
        >  
        > Lee Pao Xiong
        > Director
        > Center for Hmong Studies
        > ConcordiaUniversity,  St. Paul
        > 275 North Syndicate Street
        > St. Paul, Minnesota 55104
        > 651-641-8870
        >  
        > www.csp.edu/hmongcenter
        >  
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: hmongcultural <hmongcultural@...>
        > To: hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Friday, February 20, 2009 10:32:08 AM
        > Subject: [hmongstudies] Hmong State Population Estimates 2007 American Community Survey
        >
        >
        > This data was released last Fall but I just got around to compiling it for another project. Compared to the decennial census, the ACS doesn't seem to do such a good job of counting Hmong populations in states where the population isn't very large. I think the numbers are better for the states with the larger populations. A few years ago, Kansas came up with no Hmong which we knew was a mistake but now the estimate is 2600 Hmong there. Other states with increases in this year's estimates are Arkansas, Oklahoma and North Carolina along with Minnesota and California, the estimates were down slightly for Wisconsin. I have also posted a link to the detailed sociodemographic data from the 2007 ACS on this site.
        > http://www.hmongstu dies.org/ 2007SEAAmericanC ommunitySurvey. html
        > Mark Pfeifer
        >  
        >
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