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Re: Traditional Wedding Gifts

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  • pgxiong
    Traditionally, non family members give out gifts. Family members will give things such as blankets, pots, pans, and the usual wedding stuff. The highest
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 16, 2008
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      Traditionally, non family members give out gifts.
      Family members will give things such as blankets, pots, pans, and the
      usual wedding stuff. The highest amount of gifts that will be
      received at a traditional wedding would be money gifts from the family
      to the newly wedded couple. There usually is a list at the end of the
      wedding where the the bride's side of the family will give to the
      groom's side containing everything that was given. If you were to
      read this list, it would be mostly money on there.

      So to answer your question. Money would be a good gift. Give it in a
      white envelope with your name on it.

      PGX

      --- In hmongstudies@yahoogroups.com, "dustyjeanincolorado"
      <dustyjeanincolorado@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good Morning,
      >
      > I am attending a wedding for my husband's co-worker who is Hmong. I
      > would love to honor his heritage with a special gift. Do you have any
      > suggestions?
      >
      > Thank you for considering my question,
      > Dusty Jean
      >
    • Yang S. Xiong
      In the Hmong weddings that I have been to, a wide variety of things can serve as special gifts; it certainly doesn t have to be money. Most traditional gifts
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 18, 2008
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        In the Hmong weddings that I have been to, a wide variety of things can serve as special gifts; it certainly doesn't have to be money.  Most traditional gifts are house/home-kitchen items (cozy blankets, sets of pots & pans, etc.---not knives though).  But usually only immediate family members give clothing or paj ntaub (embroidered clothing).

        My Hmong friends have also given gifts such as jewelry, engraved photo frames (even a digital frame), digital cameras, etc.  In the traditional wedding ceremony, there is an emphasis on doing or presenting things in pairs or sets of two, rather than odd numbers.  Although gift giving does not have to follow this convention, it would be nice to buy gifts in pairs.

        I suppose it may also be helpful to know some of the things a person should avoid giving as gifts:  (1) things that are fragile or easily breakable (no one wants bad luck); (2) objects that serve important meanings in and of themselves in the wedding, such as an umbrella or Hmong clothing articles (unless one is a member of the immediate family); and (3) any other objects one would not normally give as a gift to a good friend.

        Yang Xiong







        At 08:27 AM 2/15/2008, you wrote:

        Good Morning,

        I am attending a wedding for my husband's co-worker who is Hmong. I
        would love to honor his heritage with a special gift. Do you have any
        suggestions?

        Thank you for considering my question,
        Dusty Jean

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