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Old & Historically Corrupt: Jackson & Sharpton

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  • calpatton@aol.com
    THE OLD GUARD AND MANY OF THE NEW GUARD CENSOR AND BAN INDEPENDENT BLACK WRITERS. MOST WHITES THAT CENSOR THE FREEDOMJOURNAL AND THE BIOGRAPHY OF CHIEF COTHRAN
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2001

      THE OLD GUARD AND MANY OF THE NEW GUARD CENSOR AND BAN INDEPENDENT BLACK  
      WRITERS.


      MOST WHITES THAT CENSOR THE FREEDOMJOURNAL AND THE BIOGRAPHY OF CHIEF COTHRAN
      ARE RACISTS. HOWEVER THE BLACKS THAT CENSOR THIS BOOK ARE A STRANGE BREED.
      ARE THESE NEGROES UNCLE TOMS, TRAITORS ARE BOTH?


      HELP FIGHT THE CRIMINAL ATTACK ON FREE SPEECH & CHRISTIANITY

      DO NOT ALLOW UNCLE TOMS AND RACISTS TO TELL YOU WHAT YOU CAN AND CANNOT READ.
      READ THE BIOGRAPHY OF CHIEF COTHRAN (BIG RALPH: REFLECTIONS OF A BLACK POLICE
      CHIEF) AND LEARN THE CENSORED TRUTH OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.


      Subj: Sharpton and Jackson -- Old Guard?
      Date: 8/29/2001 6:03:20 PM Central Daylight Time
      From:    sbent@... (Samantha Bent)
      Sender:    owner-bsa-list@...
      Reply-to: bsa-list@...
      To:    bsa-list@..., hvd-01@yahoogroups.com

      How Has Integration Set The Black Community Back?  Ignorance  Racism & Uncle
      Toms
       FREEDOMJOURNAL



      Interesting Commentary from the Economist (always to be taken with a grain
      of salt).

      ******************************************************************************

      TIME TO PASS ON THE TORCH


      The publicity-driven tactics of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton look
      increasingly
      tired and irrelevant. Black America needs a new generation of leaders

      IT HAS been another busy week for America's black leaders. In Chicago, Jesse
      Jackson presided over the annual meeting of the Rainbow/PUSH group (that last
      bit stands for People United to Serve Humanity), where he announced that the
      Toyota company would spend no less than $8 billion over the next ten years on
      a
      project to involve more non-whites in every aspect of its business. "More car
      dealers means less car stealers," Mr Jackson told an applauding audience.

      Soon afterwards, Al Sharpton said his farewell to the Metropolitan Detention
      Centre in Brooklyn. He was due to be released on August 17th after serving a
      90-day sentence for trespass while protesting against the American navy's
      bombing exercises on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques. Mr Sharpton now has
      to
      decide whether he wants to seek the Democratic Party's nomination for the
      presidency in 2004; he looks a bit dubious in our picture.

      Rarely out of the headlines, masters of the stage-managed event and the
      attention-grabbing soundbite, men like Mr Jackson and Mr Sharpton have long
      used the power of publicity to prod white America into recognising the claims
      of black America, and doing something to meet those claims. But, for all their
      past successes, their grandstanding now looks tired and increasingly
      irrelevant. To a growing number of blacks, their ideas have gone stale.

      "If your only tool is a hammer, everything looks like a nail," says Clarence
      Page, a columnist on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE who has followed Mr Jackson's career
      for three decades. Black America needs more sophisticated tools. Some of the
      issues that matter most--school reform, drugs policy, the rescuing of the
      family--receive scant attention because they have no easy remedies and because
      there are no obvious culprits to point a finger at. It is one thing for Mr
      Jackson to lambast the "prison industrial complex". It is another to come up
      with a coherent plan for dealing with the shockingly disproportionate number
      of
      black men in jail or on probation.

      Above all, the problems of America's blacks have changed considerably over the
      past four decades; but their leadership has not. The typical black leader is
      still a male over 50 who is a prop of the church (both Mr Jackson and Mr
      Sharpton are Reverends) and has some connection to the civil-rights movement.
      There were precious few young faces at the table of that Rainbow/PUSH meeting.

      David Bositis, an analyst at the Joint Centre for Political and Economic
      Studies, a black think-tank, sees some significant differences in the way
      different generations of American blacks look at the world. Opinion polls show
      that younger blacks, those aged between 18 and 25, are the ones most likely to
      believe that the condition of black Americans has improved over the past five
      years. The older ones are likelier to believe that it has either got no
      better,
      or actually got worse. Young blacks are far less loyal to the Democratic Party
      than their elders have been. Nearly half of the 18-25 lot describe themselves
      as politically independent. And young blacks overwhelmingly support school
      vouchers; those over 65 are strongly against.

      So where will the next lot of black leaders come from? From the increasingly
      wide range of professions in which blacks now make their mark, not just the
      civil-rights movement. "We have leaders in every walk of life now," says Mr
      Page.

      He reckons that the racial progress of the past few decades has had three main
      stages. The first was the breakthrough to legal equality in the civil-rights
      era. The second was the electorate's growing willingness to vote blacks into
      political office. And now the third and potentially the biggest wave of change
      is happening, in the private sector of the economy. The examples stretch from
      the film industry, where black directors such as John Singleton and Spike Lee
      ply their trade, to boardrooms at companies like AOL-Time Warner. Most people
      did not know that the vice-chairman of that company was black until President
      Bush appointed him to his Social Security commission, points out Mr Page.

      Politics still matter, of course. There are some 9,000 elected black officials
      in America, any one of whom could attain sudden prominence by winning election
      to statewide office. There are also 39 black members of Congress. The names of
      the same three members of the House of Representatives creep into nearly every
      conversation about future leaders.

      There is Harold Ford junior, a moderate Democrat from Tennessee who was
      elected
      to his father's seat in 1996, at the age of 26. There is J.C. Watts, an
      Oklahoma Republican who has steadily risen to a powerful position in the House
      hierarchy. And there is young Jesse Jackson, an Illinois Democrat who has
      rolled up his sleeves and delved into specific issues in a way his father
      never
      did. There is nothing very gripping about Mr Sharpton running for president,
      says Mary Mitchell, a columnist on the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES. But if Jesse junior
      ran, "Now, that would be exciting."

      These days, many of the chief concerns of black Americans have become more
      local. The time is past when the Supreme Court, with one sweeping decision,
      could push race relations in America towards dramatic change. In recent years,
      the black leaders with the most impact have been those engaged in the
      nitty-gritty task of transforming their own neighbourhoods. One outstanding
      example is Eugene Rivers, a Boston pastor whose faith-based programmes--and
      co-operation with the police--have dramatically reduced the amount of youth
      violence. "Towns that have [strong local leaders] make progress; towns that
      don't have riots," says Mr Page.

      The old guard is not gone yet. If Mr Sharpton does choose to run for the
      presidency, he is not going to win the Democratic nomination but he could get
      enough black votes in the Democratic primary to give him quite a bit of
      leverage with whoever does. And Mr Jackson still has plenty of clout, as is
      shown by the glittering people he was able to persuade to attend that Chicago
      conference: they included Bill Clinton, Tom Daschle, the Senate majority
      leader, and Jacques Nasser, the president of Ford. The veterans will also
      point
      out that it was they who created the opportunities now available to the
      youngsters who want to succeed them. Even so, it seems time for them to pass
      on
      the torch.

      See related content at
      http://www.economist.com/world/na/displayStory.cfm?Story_ID=739599

      Go to http://www.economist.com for more global news, views and analysis from
      the Economist Group.



    • calpatton@aol.com
      Thank you Brother Wil: However we suggest that you take another look at the piece on Judging. Peace, Carl Patton, FreedomJournal Greetings Brethren: There are
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2001
        Thank you Brother Wil:
        However we suggest that you take another look at the piece on Judging.
        Peace,
        Carl Patton, FreedomJournal

        Greetings Brethren:
        There are many (the multitudes) that are Lost with regard to Truth and God.
        Will the Blind ever see? So will the Blind be made Blind by their own doing?
        God is only above the scrutiny of humankind.
        Peace and Love,
        Carl Patton writing for the FreedomJournal August 31, 2001 in the year of our
        Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

        CHRISTIANITY: FALSE DOCTRINE, FALSE TEACHING
        (Judgement/Judge Series)

        Part 4: What Is Judge Not, That Ye Be Not Judged?
        Pastors Appreciation: Rituals & Money  Confrontation of Truth & knowledge

        In the name of God, Master of the universe, Ruler of the earth.


        Being able to distinguish between good and evil is very important for
        Christians. Thus, the difference between the righteous and the unrighteous
        must be evident to all Christians. Therefore God is good and righteous and
        Satan is evil and unrighteous.

        The scripture noted in Matthew 7:1-5 is some of the most mis-quoted and
        mis-understood scripture in the Bible. However we believe that usually this
        scripture is willfully mis-interpreted.
        The first verse reads:
        "Jude not, that ye be not judged."

        Many people that resent being brought up for review and corrected for wrong
        doing, (for example most Preachers) often quote this scripture. Also, many
        apologists for False Prophets often quote this scripture. We have also
        witnessed people that have very little knowledge about the Bible quoting this
        scripture in defense of evil wicked people. These people have heard this
        scripture quoted.  Thus, it has become a classic response to any criticism
        levied against the church and its leadership.

        Meanwhile these apologists and those ignorant of the scriptures fail to note
        that the word Judge like many other words in the Bible has various meanings.
        Thus, intelligent Bible readers determine the particular context of the
        scripture and how a particular word is used. This brings up the argument that
        the Bible often contradicts itself. For the record the Bible does not
        contradict itself. However man in his shallow wisdom and often irresponsible
        attitude poses a contradiction. This contradiction usually arises from an
        ignorant person relying on a wicked Preacher to think for him. Meanwhile he
        does not take the time required to read companion and related scripture that
        will bring clarity and understanding to a particular Biblical question.

        For example in John 7: 24 Jesus says for us to judge. However, Jesus says
        make righteous judgement. Thus we see in Matthew 7:1 that we are instructed
        not to make an unrighteous judgement. Therefore in Matthew if the judgement
        is made according to truth and facts in a particular case then it would be
        righteous judgement and not forbidden by this verse.

        The statement by Jesus "Judge not" is against destructive criticism that
        seeks to tear down someone, to build up oneself. It is not against critical
        thinking, but a call to be discerning rather than negative. We also should be
        eager to examine our own motives and conduct before any evaluation of others.
        One cannot be critical of other people for offenses that he wilfully commits
         with no remorse.

        Thus magnifying others faults are incorrect while ignoring our own. However,
        if we keep God first and exercise love for God, we will have a forgiving
        heart and strive to help our neighbors.

        The contradictions of a hypocrite are also reflected in these verses.
        Hypocrites are people who pretend to be something they are not. Thus, two
        wrongs do not make a right. You cannot judge or criticize a drunkard who
        actually drinks less than you do.

        Meanwhile Jesus tells us in Matthew 7:15-20 to discern false teachers. False
        Prophets were common in Old Testament times. They claimed God divinely
        inspired them, but they only prophesied what the king and the people wanted
        to hear. In the year 2001 we still have False Prophets. Since the world has
        grown large with an increase in population, we have countless False Prophets
        today of every religion race and description.

        However Jesus teaches that the Saints of God should beware of those that are
        smooth talkers and sound very religious who always beg for money. You can
        always determine False Prophets if money, fame or power motivates them. Those
        that increase themselves and decrease Christ are to be held up for review.

        For a concluding statement we return to John 7: 24:
        "Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgement."

        Again we note that people resent and take offense to being penalized and
        criticized. We believe that church Leaders/Preachers/Teachers are at the head
        of this list. Therefore, they have been the primary sources of
        mis-information about Judging. These people consistently make a defense for
        their acts by quoting Matthew 7:1.

        However, they only render a superficial and limited review of this scripture.
        They willfully or out of ignorance fail to consider all that Jesus says in
        this scripture. The word appearance in this scripture in John is very
        important.  Also, Jesus gives more specific information on the act of Judging.

        Here we see the clear logic too not to make conclusions solely on outward
        appearance. The honest and sensible thing to do is to gather all the facts.
        Thus, one should investigate a given situation and get the whole truth. Then
        a judgement or evaluation can be rendered based on truth and honesty, thus a
        righteous judgement.

        Other scripture references are noted in:
        Luke 6:37-42 Jesus teaches about criticizing others.
        James 4:11, Romans 2:1-3, God's judgement of sin.

        Cont. Part 5: The Last Judgement

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