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What's the real deal with North Korea/US showdown.

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  • caribdigita
    Article: China slams US policy on North Korean nuclear crisis - Agence France-Presse Date: Manila, September 1, 2003 Source: www.hindustantimes.com - Hindustan
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 1, 2003
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      Article: China slams US policy on North Korean nuclear crisis
      - Agence France-Presse
      Date: Manila, September 1, 2003
      Source: www.hindustantimes.com - Hindustan (a.k.a India) Times.

      Link: http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_357607,00050004.htm

      China on Monday slammed the United States for its policy on North
      Korea saying that it is the biggest obstacle in resolving the nuclear
      crisis in the Korean peninsula.

      China's chief delegate to the recently concluded six-nation talks on
      the stand-off Vice Foreign Minister Wang Yi said, "The American
      policy towards DPRK -- this is the main problem we are facing."

      North Korea, officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of
      Korea (DPRK), had said that its expectations at last week's talks,
      also involving China, Japan, Russia and South Korea, had
      been "betrayed" by "hostile" US policy.

      North Korea also described the discussions as "pointless" and threw
      into doubt its participation at the next round of talks.

      Washington has reportedly rejected Pyongyang's demand for a non-
      aggression pact and other concessions as a precondition to
      dismantling its nuclear programmes.

      [e.g. No doubt to not witness an invasion once it dismantles it's
      nukes like what Iraq went through.]

      Wang, who is accompanying China's number two leader Wu Bangguo to an
      Asian parliamentary meeting in Manila, indicated that Washington
      might have to make its position on North Korea clearer.

      "We hope each party, including the US and DPRK, move together so we
      can find the final solution," he said as he assessed the maiden round
      of the Beijing negotiations.

      Washington has been adamant that the Stalinist state's nuclear
      programme must be dismantled before it will consider economic
      assistance and diplomatic normalisation for the bankrupt country.

      North Korea's chief negotiator Kim Yong-II repeated during the talks
      in Beijing the regime's long-standing demands that a non-aggression
      pact be signed, diplomatic relations be normalised and the United
      States refrain from interfering in the North's economic relations
      with other countries.

      The crisis erupted in October after Washington said North Korea had
      admitted to running a nuclear programme based on enriched uranium in
      violation of a 1994 nuclear freeze accord.[-End]
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