Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Ah, to be in Rye

Expand Messages
  • Jo Kirkham
    Hi Dian, Let me know when you organise your trip to Rye - and I ll show you round. Yes I have read Daughter of Time - and found it fascinating. I ve just
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 2, 1999
      Hi Dian,

      Let me know when you organise your trip to Rye - and I'll show you round.

      Yes I have read "Daughter of Time" - and found it fascinating.

      I've just been doing a re-read of Pamela Belle's books - mainly on 17 England - very well put together - she gets lots of tributes on the covers from Rosemary Sutcliffe and she is also an avid Dorothy Dunnett reader.

      I also like Historical Who dunits - anyone else like them?
      Edward Marston, Lindsay Davis, Steven Saylor, Peter Tremayne, Keith Heller, The various Paul Docherty alias's, Candace Robb, Susanna Gregory, Michael Jecks, Elizabeth Eyre, Margaret Frazer etc.

      Many of these are actually written by academics who like to get their "theory" across to a wider public.
      Peter Tremayne is actually Peter Berrisford Ellis - a professor of Celtic Studies and his heroine is a wonderful Celtic Nun called Sister Fildelma.
      Lindsay Davis is actually the President of the Classical Association of Great Britain this year etc.

      Jo

      Rye


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Dian Fielding <lyricall23@...>
      To: histfict@onelist.com <histfict@onelist.com>
      Date: 01 January 1999 02:43
      Subject: [histfict] Ah, to be in Rye


      >From: Dian Fielding <lyricall23@...>
      >
      >Jo:
      >
      >> do you know Rye?
      >It's small - about 4000 people - and Medieval - cobbled streets, black
      >and white half-timbered and wattle and daub houses. a castle, walls
      >early Norman church etc - all on what was an island until a couple of
      >hundred years ago.
      >
      >Gosh, it sounds idyllic! Rye was actually on my wishlist for the last
      >trip (in '92) but I couldn't fit it in. Now you've inspired me to
      >make it there next time.
      >
      >>Enjoy Gabaldon - I did.
      >I am - thoroughly!!! I'm 200 pages into the first one & can't find
      >enough time to read as much as I want. I have already purchased the 3
      >sequels, so I'll be w/Claire for quite a while it seems.
      >
      >>Have you read Dorothy Dunnett?
      >No, not yet. I have a couple (the books I've picked up over the
      >years, thinking that someday I'll get around to reading them all) &
      >plan to read them as soon as I can fit them in. By the size of the
      >Gabaldons, I may be busy for awhile :-)
      >
      >Have you read Jarman or Penman yet? I've been saving "When Christ &
      >His Saints Slept" & when she puts another out in that series, I'll
      >dive in. (it's always nice to have one in reserve, I find).
      >
      >Has anyone read "Daughter of Time"? Fascinating!
      >
      >Dian
      >
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
      >to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
      >select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.
      >
    • Arwen Evenstar
      ... I do! My favorite historical whodunnit is, of course, Ellis Peters. I haven t read much by the ones you list, and some of those I have read only short
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 2, 1999
        Jo Kirkham wrote:

        > I also like Historical Who dunits - anyone else like them?
        > Edward Marston, Lindsay Davis, Steven Saylor, Peter Tremayne, Keith Heller, The various Paul Docherty alias's, Candace Robb, Susanna Gregory, Michael Jecks, Elizabeth Eyre, Margaret Frazer etc.

        I do! My favorite historical whodunnit is, of course, Ellis Peters. I haven't read much by the ones you list, and some of those I have read only short stories rather than full-length novels. But I really enjoy them because
        I love a good mystery and if it includes accurate history, that's a bonus. To be honest, I wasn't particularly impressed with Paul Doherty or Susanna Gregory, but I've only tried one book each by them. So I will probably
        have to go back and give them another shot.

        Does Elizabeth Peters qualify as historical whodunnit? Her Amelia Peabody series is set around the turn of the century. It is largely because of her novels that I have developed an interest in Egyptology. I have also
        discovered Kate Ross, whose Julian Kestrel series is set in London in the 1820's. Very good!

        I suppose Laurie R. King's series with Sherlock Holmes and his wife (yes, wife!) Mary Russell would also qualify as historical. The book I am reading at present is set in 1927. I've read less than half of it, but so far I'm
        fairly impressed. I was all set to be offended and appalled by it. Doyle's Holmes being such an avowed misogynist, marrying him seems to verge a little on the sacrilegious. But this is very well done, and King is a very
        good writer.

        Gotta get back to the library pile now, before I have to renew them yet again...
        Emily
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.