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Re: [histfict] New Member, Here

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  • Marilyn Morris
    Thanks, Sydney. Sydney wrote: Hello Marilyn, I love that period, but I have no suggestions for you. I do, however, wish you the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 31, 2008
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      Thanks, Sydney.

      Sydney <autumn_moon1@...> wrote: Hello Marilyn,
      I love that period, but I have no suggestions for you. I do, however, wish you the best of luck with your book.

      Sydney


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: marilyncmorris
      To: histfict@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2008 3:42 PM
      Subject: [histfict] New Member, Here


      I think I have bitten off more than I can chew as far as research goes.
      I'm doing a historical novel set in Victorian England 1880-1901 about
      an explorer and his assistant, who has recently passed the test for
      transcribing his dictation in the new shorthand. I have much of the
      plot set down, but find that everything I mention needs some research --
      railway stations and tickets, carriages, manners, servants, etc.
      Looking for some sites that might be more concise than the ones I've
      found so far. Any suggestions?
      Thanks!
      Marilyn





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      Yahoo! Groups Links






      Marilyn Celeste Morris
      Author of Sabbath's Room, a supernatural mystery; Once a Brat, relating my experiences as a "military brat" from 1938 to 1958; and Diagnosis: Lupus, The Intimate Journal of a Lupus Patient. All published by PublishAmerica, available on Amazon.com or at your local bookstores. EDITING SERVICES: On-line or hard copy. Email for details. Listed in April 2004 issue of Writers' Digest Novel Writing as one of 31 recommended editors. website:http://www.thewriterslife.net/marilyncelestemorris.html
      http://www.freewebs.com/graceworksproductions/

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sharp, Ann (GT&D)
      Marilyn I think I have bitten off more than I can chew as far as research goes. I m doing a historical novel set in Victorian England 1880-1901 about an
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 5, 2008
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        Marilyn
        I think I have bitten off more than I can chew as far as research goes.
        I'm doing a historical novel set in Victorian England 1880-1901 about an
        explorer and his assistant, who has recently passed the test for
        transcribing his dictation in the new shorthand. I have much of the
        plot set down, but find that everything I mention needs some research --
        railway stations and tickets, carriages, manners, servants, etc.

        Ann:
        Shorthand wasn't new -- Cicero had a slave, Marcus Tullius
        Tiro, who is traditionally said to have created "shorthand," and, of
        course, the Bushel/William Penn trial (1670) account survives only
        because it was taken in shorthand. Classical Egyptian demotic was
        shorthand for hieroglyphs, come to that.

        The typewriting machine was, of course, new (patented in 1868,
        mass-marketed in 1877). An amusing introduction to the 1870's
        type-writer is in ESTER REID YET SPEAKING
        <http://gutenberg.dlib.ir/Access/gtnletA.htm#aldenisa>

        You might find a first-edition Emily Post invaluable (there are
        probably facsimiles of the first edition). There's a book called A
        LONDON FAMILY, a compilation of "A London Child of the 1870s", "A London
        Girl of the 1880s", and "A London Home of the 1890s." You'll like
        Molly.
        <http://www.amazon.co.uk/London-Family-1870-1900-Trilogy-Letters/dp/0192
        828967>

        L.P.H.,

        Ann
      • Marilyn Morris
        Thanks, Ann. Appreciate the tips. I think I have run across the London Home of the 1890s somewhere in my wanderings along the Intenet Trail. And I picked
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 6, 2008
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          Thanks, Ann. Appreciate the tips. I think I have run across the London Home of the 1890s somewhere in my wanderings along the Intenet Trail. And I picked the Pittman Shorthand method just because that particular use of shorthand was "new" to that era and the heroine had learned it in London. She could have very well used an older form, but that's the one I chose......
          Marilyn

          rp, Ann (GT&D)" <axsc@...> wrote:
          Marilyn
          I think I have bitten off more than I can chew as far as research goes.
          I'm doing a historical novel set in Victorian England 1880-1901 about an
          explorer and his assistant, who has recently passed the test for
          transcribing his dictation in the new shorthand. I have much of the
          plot set down, but find that everything I mention needs some research --
          railway stations and tickets, carriages, manners, servants, etc.

          Ann:
          Shorthand wasn't new -- Cicero had a slave, Marcus Tullius
          Tiro, who is traditionally said to have created "shorthand," and, of
          course, the Bushel/William Penn trial (1670) account survives only
          because it was taken in shorthand. Classical Egyptian demotic was
          shorthand for hieroglyphs, come to that.

          The typewriting machine was, of course, new (patented in 1868,
          mass-marketed in 1877). An amusing introduction to the 1870's
          type-writer is in ESTER REID YET SPEAKING


          You might find a first-edition Emily Post invaluable (there are
          probably facsimiles of the first edition). There's a book called A
          LONDON FAMILY, a compilation of "A London Child of the 1870s", "A London
          Girl of the 1880s", and "A London Home of the 1890s." You'll like
          Molly.
          828967>

          L.P.H.,

          Ann



          Yahoo! Groups Links






          Marilyn Celeste Morris
          Author of Sabbath's Room, a supernatural mystery; Once a Brat, relating my experiences as a "military brat" from 1938 to 1958; and Diagnosis: Lupus, The Intimate Journal of a Lupus Patient. All published by PublishAmerica, available on Amazon.com or at your local bookstores. EDITING SERVICES: On-line or hard copy. Email for details. Listed in April 2004 issue of Writers' Digest Novel Writing as one of 31 recommended editors. website:http://www.thewriterslife.net/marilyncelestemorris.html
          http://www.freewebs.com/graceworksproductions/

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ann Sharp
          ... Ann: I mentioned it specifically because my great-grandmother (1861- 1942), born and raised in Ontario, Canada, learned Pittman as a girl. As a widow in
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 9, 2008
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            Marilyn wrote:

            > And I picked the Pittman Shorthand method just because
            > that particular use of shorthand was "new" to that era
            > and the heroine had learned it in London. She could
            > have very well used an older form, but that's the one
            > I chose......


            Ann:

            I mentioned it specifically because my great-grandmother (1861-
            1942), born and raised in Ontario, Canada, learned Pittman as a
            girl. As a widow in 1895, she brought her children to San Francisco
            and -- having been trained as a teacher -- she taught. One of her
            first requests was to teach shorthand, but, to her consternation,
            they expected her to teach the Gregg system. My grandmother said
            that she did, and did it well, but she was one chapter ahead of the
            pupils the whole course.

            L.P.H.,

            Ann
          • sandra_gulland
            Merilyn, I don t have any specific suggestions (and you have some good ones here), but just want to say that that feeling of having bitten off more than you
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 12, 2008
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              Merilyn, I don't have any specific suggestions (and you have some good
              ones here), but just want to say that that feeling of having bitten
              off more than you can chew is common to all writers of historical
              fiction, I suspect.

              Bon courage!

              Sandra Gulland
              www.sandragulland.com




              --- In histfict@yahoogroups.com, "marilyncmorris" <marilyncmorris@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I think I have bitten off more than I can chew as far as research goes.
              > I'm doing a historical novel set in Victorian England 1880-1901 about
              > an explorer and his assistant, who has recently passed the test for
              > transcribing his dictation in the new shorthand. I have much of the
              > plot set down, but find that everything I mention needs some research --
              > railway stations and tickets, carriages, manners, servants, etc.
              > Looking for some sites that might be more concise than the ones I've
              > found so far. Any suggestions?
              > Thanks!
              > Marilyn
              >
            • JN
              Hi Sandra Good to see you posting. Just to say best of luck with the new book - looking forward to it. (I posted about it on another forum and there was quite
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 12, 2008
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                Hi Sandra

                Good to see you posting. Just to say best of luck with the new book -
                looking forward to it. (I posted about it on another forum and there was
                quite some interest.)

                Justin


                ----- Original Message -----

                Merilyn, I don't have any specific suggestions (and you have some good
                ones here), but just want to say that that feeling of having bitten
                off more than you can chew is common to all writers of historical
                fiction, I suspect.

                Bon courage!

                Sandra Gulland
                www.sandragulland.com
              • sandra_gulland
                Thank you, Justin!
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 13, 2008
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                  Thank you, Justin!


                  --- In histfict@yahoogroups.com, "JN" <sweetpotatoboy@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Sandra
                  >
                  > Good to see you posting. Just to say best of luck with the new book -
                  > looking forward to it. (I posted about it on another forum and there was
                  > quite some interest.)
                  >
                  > Justin
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  >
                  > Merilyn, I don't have any specific suggestions (and you have some good
                  > ones here), but just want to say that that feeling of having bitten
                  > off more than you can chew is common to all writers of historical
                  > fiction, I suspect.
                  >
                  > Bon courage!
                  >
                  > Sandra Gulland
                  > www.sandragulland.com
                  >
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