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Pictures of my hexbeam

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  • rkiskan
    Hi, I have added some pics. of my hexbeam under OZ6ABM - 5P5R. Some details: - the beam is mounted on a telescopic antenna mast. Retracted at about 8 feet high
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 3, 2007
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      Hi,

      I have added some pics. of my hexbeam under OZ6ABM - 5P5R.

      Some details:

      - the beam is mounted on a telescopic antenna mast. Retracted at
      about 8 feet high and telescoped at approximately 40 feet. This uses
      a hand winch.

      - the material costs of this antenna were approximately 100 US$ - but
      it took many hours and lots of good assistance from Steve G3TXQ to
      get some issues sorted out.

      - the base plate is double-layered cut from a 3/8 plastic cutting
      board. The rest of the board was used to make doughnut type rings for
      mounting the directors and reflectors. This means that I can easily
      slide the the rings along the center mast. The spcing is held in
      place by the coax cables and all is tied using plastic zippers - no
      drilling.

      - the spraders are tensioned with building string - the stuff they
      use to align tiles (looks like nylon to me).

      - on the base plate I used the large ends of the crappie poles as
      sockets for the spreaders. But what you don't see is that inside each
      is a lenth of varnished broomstick, so the spreader slides into a
      sleeve and also explains why the two base plates don't sandwich and
      crush the spreaders.

      - all openings are sealed with self-amalgamating tape.

      - the center pole is made from a kitchen PVC pipe - if I recally
      aproximately 1.75 inches diameter. Then I tok a second similar pipe
      and routed out a quarter inch all the way along its length- I could
      then squeeze the split pipe into the outer pipe and I then hammered a
      brromstick all the way down its length. The center pole is not fixed
      to the baseplate or vica-versa. the weight of the baseplate and the
      tension of the spreaders keeps everything in check.

      - the entire antenna is mounted on a small TV antenna rotor - I
      picked that new at a flea market for 15 US$.

      - one picture depicts a scan of the antenna using an Array Solutions
      AIM. Interesting is that the SWR is not that god on 12 and 10, but it
      was good when the antenna was lowered - so it may be because I have
      lots of trees that are in many cases highers than the antenna and
      also quite close by.

      The entire setup is about 100 feet from my shack. I am having god
      results despite the atmospheric conditions. The only real problem I
      have is that there is some slop in the telescoping sections, so the
      direction on the rotor is variable within 30 or degrees. Then there
      are the usual issues of tree branches and leaves that need to get
      trimmed.

      73
      Robin

      OZ6ABM - 5P5R
    • k4kio
      Robin: Congratulations on the new hexbeam. You used your imagination to come up with some unique ideas. Keep us informed on how it is doing. Leo, K4KIO
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 4, 2007
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        Robin:

        Congratulations on the new hexbeam. You used your imagination to come
        up with some unique ideas. Keep us informed on how it is doing.

        Leo, K4KIO


        --- In hex-beam@yahoogroups.com, "rkiskan" <robin_kiszka@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I have added some pics. of my hexbeam under OZ6ABM - 5P5R.
        >
        > Some details:
        >
        > - the beam is mounted on a telescopic antenna mast. Retracted at
        > about 8 feet high and telescoped at approximately 40 feet. This uses
        > a hand winch.
        >
        > - the material costs of this antenna were approximately 100 US$ - but
        > it took many hours and lots of good assistance from Steve G3TXQ to
        > get some issues sorted out.
        >
        > - the base plate is double-layered cut from a 3/8 plastic cutting
        > board. The rest of the board was used to make doughnut type rings for
        > mounting the directors and reflectors. This means that I can easily
        > slide the the rings along the center mast. The spcing is held in
        > place by the coax cables and all is tied using plastic zippers - no
        > drilling.
        >
        > - the spraders are tensioned with building string - the stuff they
        > use to align tiles (looks like nylon to me).
        >
        > - on the base plate I used the large ends of the crappie poles as
        > sockets for the spreaders. But what you don't see is that inside each
        > is a lenth of varnished broomstick, so the spreader slides into a
        > sleeve and also explains why the two base plates don't sandwich and
        > crush the spreaders.
        >
        > - all openings are sealed with self-amalgamating tape.
        >
        > - the center pole is made from a kitchen PVC pipe - if I recally
        > aproximately 1.75 inches diameter. Then I tok a second similar pipe
        > and routed out a quarter inch all the way along its length- I could
        > then squeeze the split pipe into the outer pipe and I then hammered a
        > brromstick all the way down its length. The center pole is not fixed
        > to the baseplate or vica-versa. the weight of the baseplate and the
        > tension of the spreaders keeps everything in check.
        >
        > - the entire antenna is mounted on a small TV antenna rotor - I
        > picked that new at a flea market for 15 US$.
        >
        > - one picture depicts a scan of the antenna using an Array Solutions
        > AIM. Interesting is that the SWR is not that god on 12 and 10, but it
        > was good when the antenna was lowered - so it may be because I have
        > lots of trees that are in many cases highers than the antenna and
        > also quite close by.
        >
        > The entire setup is about 100 feet from my shack. I am having god
        > results despite the atmospheric conditions. The only real problem I
        > have is that there is some slop in the telescoping sections, so the
        > direction on the rotor is variable within 30 or degrees. Then there
        > are the usual issues of tree branches and leaves that need to get
        > trimmed.
        >
        > 73
        > Robin
        >
        > OZ6ABM - 5P5R
        >
      • Steve
        Robin, Nice job! It s good to see some pictures of the antenna after all our e-mails :) Let us know how it performs. 73, Steve G3TXQ
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 4, 2007
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          Robin,

          Nice job!

          It's good to see some pictures of the antenna after all our e-mails :)

          Let us know how it performs.

          73,

          Steve G3TXQ
        • rkiskan
          Hi Steve, The beam is performing OK. Just being able to use 5 bands instead of 3 on the old tri-bander makes a big difference when going to 12 and 17. As you
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 5, 2007
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            Hi Steve,

            The beam is performing OK. Just being able to use 5 bands instead of
            3
            on the old tri-bander makes a big difference when going to 12 and 17.

            As you know we spent much time trying to analyze the low S level on
            10m ... well it seems like it's a receiver issue. I have tried with
            other rigs and the S-level is more consistent. So much for new
            radios :-
            )

            I have no problem getting DX, from Denmark to Japan is easy short
            path.
            I know that the reception is good because I sometimes hear local
            stations having their CQ calls answered, they cannot hear those
            answers, but I do :-)

            Directivity seems good. In nearly all cases a DX station will only be
            heard if the beam is pointing in the correct direction.

            My concern is that in some directions I am below the tree canopy, so
            I
            am considering a taller mast. Another issue is the attachment of the
            elements to the coax - I have used a bolt and nut with split washer
            arrangement and this is tricky, mainly because of the proximity to
            the
            center pole and it requires lots of delicate fidgeting to get things
            tightened. In the future I will go for some sort of push-and-click
            socket system like you find on the back of speaker cabinets (or
            something similar).

            My plan is to see how the antenna fares during the Winter with all
            the
            ice, and if is survives then maybe upgrade the element issue. If not
            then I will probably look toward getting some robust spreaders.

            Thanks again for all the help.

            73
            Robin
            OZ6ABM/5P5R

            --- In hex-beam@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <steve@...> wrote:
            >
            > Robin,
            >
            > Nice job!
            >
            > It's good to see some pictures of the antenna after all our e-
            mails :)
            >
            > Let us know how it performs.
            >
            > 73,
            >
            > Steve G3TXQ
            >
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