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7254Re: [helminthictherapy] Re: Worms missmigrating and causing problems?

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  • Eve Gerome
    Jun 7, 2011
      Roundworms, Ascaris spp, are well known for migration through the brain and eyes of the wrong species. Occassionally children can have it occur in the US from the roundworns of dogs and raccoons, mostly.
      I have never heard of hookworms or whipworms in these areas of the body.
      Eve G (veterinarian)


      From: donnabeales <dbeales@...>
      To: helminthictherapy@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, June 7, 2011 12:34:32 PM
      Subject: [helminthictherapy] Re: Worms missmigrating and causing problems?

       

      This may be the paper Marc is referring to in relation to T. suis and mis-migration, known scientifically as larva migrans:

      http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/full/10.1043/1543-2165(2007)131%5B180:ITS\I%5D2.0.CO%3B2

      It took me awhile to remember where I'd heard about it.

      FYI, ensure that you capture the entire hyperlink; otherwise it will not work properly.

      --- In helminthictherapy@yahoogroups.com, "marc_dellerba" <marc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mis-migration is most likely to happen if you cross species, i.e. you get infected with a helminth from another species such as pig whipworm. This is rare, I am only aware of one report where pig whipworm mis-migrated and I am trying to track down that paper. The other situation where there would be concern is in someone who is severely immuno-compromised, such as with HIV/AIDs.
      >
      > I am unaware of any literature describing mis-migration of human hookworm or whipworm in humans.
      >
      > Marc
      >
      > --- In helminthictherapy@yahoogroups.com, Meghan MacNamara <meghmacn@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I looked this up a lot before starting on helminthic therapy for MS. From what I understand, there are two kinds of HW and the one used for helminthic therapy (necator americanus) does not cause what are called subcutaneous migrains. Roundworms can do that as can other species of worms.  In fact, we see this a lot in under-developed nations or, where I live, with the Amish population, but to the best of my knowledge, the worms used for human treatment do not -- or at least very rarely migrate.  This is a question for a parasitologist or a vet, though and I am neither.
      > >
      > >  
      > > Meghan
      > >
      > > Paws n'Time
      > > http://www.petfinder.com/shelters/PA674.html
      > > http://twitter.com/PawsnTime
      > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/rswatski/sets/72157624378274772/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Alberto <albertorivas100@>
      > > To: helminthictherapy@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Sunday, June 5, 2011 3:53 AM
      > > Subject: [helminthictherapy] Re: Worms missmigrating and causing problems?
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > > With over 300 punters following treatment you bet that anything like that and we would all know about it. We might be brave but not stupid. Alberto
      > >
      > > --- In helminthictherapy@yahoogroups.com, "mikkivihrea" <mikkivihrea@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi!
      > > > Are there any documented cases where hookworms missmigrate in the body (for example, to the eyes or to the brain), and cause serious problems (like blindness)? Are there any good parasitology texts that might clear these sorts of concerns? Or has anyone discussed this issue with a competent doctor?
      > > >
      > > > I still have not mustered the courage to try hookworms for my asthma. I'm first gonna try all that conventional medicine has to offer, but I certainly haven't had complete success at getting it under control.
      > > >
      > > > I have a lot of respect for all you pioneers out there who have more courage than I do!
      > > >
      > >
      >

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