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Re: Photos of my new cork paddles!

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  • bjgmann1@msn.com
    ... try ... I think Eagle table tennis may have been in business at least through the mid- 50s. I vaguely remember a Gary, Indiana sporting goods store which
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2001
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      --- In hardbat@y..., al_papp@y... wrote:
      > Hi all, I just put a couple pictures of my newly acquired cork
      > paddles on the hardbat list's web page. Here are the links:
      >
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hardbat/files/corkbats1.jpg
      >
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hardbat/files/corkbats2.jpg
      >
      > Does anybody on the list have experience playing corkbat? I will
      try
      > out my "new" paddles on Monday, and report the results.
      >
      > The paddles appear to be pretty old, and from the smell of them,
      > they've been sitting in a basement for many years. The logo on the
      > handles says "Eagle Table Tennis". Has anyone ever heard of that
      > company? The bat is made up of three plys, and there is a thin
      > covering of cork on either hitting side.
      >
      > Al

      I think Eagle table tennis may have been in business at least through
      the mid-'50s. I vaguely remember a Gary, Indiana sporting goods
      store which sold that brand along with Harvard, Wilson and possibly
      Tatco.

      I haven't played corkbat since junior high school. Some of the house
      bats in the homeroom where we fast twitch fiber types too short for
      basketball and too skinny for football played at lunchtime in the
      winter months were covered with cork. Back then as a backhand
      blocker with paddle held downward in a fist grip even Marty wouldn't
      have used for hustling I preferred cork and hard rubber to sandpaper,
      as it gave a bit more cushioning to my favorite, and only effective
      shot, the sharply angled backhand block off the side of the table.

      There were drawbacks to playing with cork or hard rubber, however.
      These paddles got a lot of use and weren't always treated kindly by
      the 12-15 year old boys we were. Thus there were usually fair
      amounts of cork and hard rubber missing around the blade edges and
      where thumb and forefinger rubbed up and down during grip changes.
      Sandpaper may have become chipped, torn or unglued from time to time,
      but a sheet or two from shop class and some Lepage's mucilage would
      usually remedy that problem.

      I suspect, Al, that a cork paddle in terms of spin producing,
      reversing and continuing properties would be somewhere between
      sandpaper (lower) and hard rubber (higher). Corkbat might be a
      little more suited to the all-round game than sandpaper; not quite as
      much so as hard rubber.

      Berndt
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