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RE: [Hammock Camping] the ongoing saga of wet-weather testing

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  • Ed Speer
    Marta, sorry to hear about your ongoing problems with rain getting into your hammock. I ve tried many different solutions and have always had excellent
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 31, 2005
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      Marta, sorry to hear about your ongoing problems with rain getting into your
      hammock. I've tried many different solutions and have always had excellent
      success with the simple solution of tying socks or bandanas onto the straps
      to serve as drip catchers. I know you've tried this already with poor
      results, but I suspect the rain got pass the bandana because it was tied too
      loose or tied in such a manner that the webbing strap folded back onto
      itself, thus allowing water to soak past the bandana. Your next post
      suggests you're trying this again-hope it works this time! ..Ed



      Moderator, Hammock Camping List
      Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

      Editor, Hammock Camping News

      Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



      _____

      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of marta_clark
      Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2005 6:44 PM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] the ongoing saga of wet-weather testing



      It seemed like the perfect opportunity--heavy rains possible off and
      on all weekend. (Alas, I missed some real downpours during the week
      when I was at work.) My son had eaten enough Pringles to give me the
      requisite plastic caps.

      The rain started this morning as I was getting home from doing
      errands. I stabbed a little slit in the center of two Pringles
      lids. I quickly pitched the tarp and hammock in the woods behind the
      house, feeding the hammock straps through the slits in the process.
      I did not attempt to make the slit fit the strap, or to seal it
      against moisture. Of course I needed to make the testing conditions
      as realistic as possible so I grabbed a book and got into the
      hammock. To keep slugs from gathering on my sandals (see the post
      from a number of weeks ago about that subject), I hung a plastic bag
      from a caribiner at the head of the hammock, just above the knot, and
      put the sandals inside.

      At first the plastic caps seemed to be working. Water was hitting
      them and dripping off. As the rain got heavier, though, water was
      continuing down past the caps and dripping off at the point where the
      D ring holding the bug net cord attaches. Because it was the middle
      of the day, I could clearly see the line at my feet and could see the
      exact path of the water. The storm was not tropical-storm intensity,
      but it was respectable and I could see that the plastic caps were not
      working. I managed to get in a good nap anyway.

      When I got up from the nap and took the sandals out of the plastic
      bag, there was around half a cup of water puddled in the bag.
      Apparently it had traveled down the caribiner, down the bag's
      handles, and right into the bag itself. Which beats having it run
      into the hammock, but it's still not the solution I'm looking for.
      I'm going to mull things over tonight and perhaps get to try
      something else out tomorrow, assuming we get another storm.

      Marta






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    • marta_clark
      I think it was more that the pieces of cloth I was using were too small. I had torn very thin strips of bandana cloth and tied them on the straps. They
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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        I think it was more that the pieces of cloth I was using were too
        small. I had torn very thin strips of bandana cloth and tied them on
        the straps. They didn't really form any sort of dike against the
        water, which just rushed right across and through them.

        Marta

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
        > Marta, sorry to hear about your ongoing problems with rain getting
        into your
        > hammock. I've tried many different solutions and have always had
        excellent
        > success with the simple solution of tying socks or bandanas onto
        the straps
        > to serve as drip catchers. I know you've tried this already with
        poor
        > results, but I suspect the rain got pass the bandana because it was
        tied too
        > loose or tied in such a manner that the webbing strap folded back
        onto
        > itself, thus allowing water to soak past the bandana. Your next
        post
        > suggests you're trying this again-hope it works this time! ..Ed
        >
        >
        >
        > Moderator, Hammock Camping List
        > Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide
        >
        > Editor, Hammock Camping News
        >
        > Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc
      • Dave Womble
        Marta, After your first post, I happened to be looking a webbing for tree attachments... so I looked at the rain issue as well. I just used a hose pipe with
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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          Marta,

          After your first post, I happened to be looking a webbing for tree
          attachments... so I looked at the rain issue as well. I just used a
          hose pipe with the water turned low and put the water on the trees
          (one smooth bark and one rough bark) just above the webbing...
          figured this would be about as bad as it could get, was on demand and
          somewhat repeatable. Note that I just used 1" polypropylene webbing
          I got at WalMart, from the weight I'm guessing about 490 lb breaking
          strength. I tried several things; other pieces of webbing sewn as
          drip stoppers, a 1.5 inch descender ring in between webbing, bowline
          knot finishing off non-cinching wraps around the tree and socks tied
          to the webbing. Nothing worked as well as the synthetic material
          socks-- all the other techniques were dependent on orientation, the
          rate at which the water came down the webbing and/or how long it had
          been coming down the webbing (they sometimes seemed to perform a
          little differently when they were saturated). I was particularly
          disappointed in the 1.5" descender rings (about 1/2 ounce each?) as I
          thought for sure they would totally solve the problem; they didn't
          have enough 'uphill' to them because of the hammock sag angle to
          handle anything more than drips; they couldn't handle higher volumes
          of water, it that case the stream of water would bridge it.

          Just thought I would pass this along, good luck with your testing.

          Youngblood
        • gear_collector
          Sorry to be jumping in the conversation at this point, but would something as simple as a thick rubber band looped tightly around the hammock line do the
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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            Sorry to be jumping in the conversation at this point, but would
            something as simple as a thick rubber band looped tightly around the
            hammock line do the trick? I envision a large and wide rubber band
            wrapped around the line many times in the same spot to build up a sort
            of rubber washer, making the water have to travel uphill to get by.
            The band couldn't become saturated and it would seem the water would
            be forced to drip of the lower end, or am I all wet on this one?

            David
          • Dave Womble
            David, No problem about joining in. The only way I know to find it is to try it. I used pieces of webbing material sewn tightly on both sides and past both
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 1, 2005
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              David,

              No problem about joining in. The only way I know to find it is to try
              it. I used pieces of webbing material sewn tightly on both sides and
              past both edges of the webbing to act as drip stoppers, but only saw
              limited success. Everthing I tried did some good, but in my tests the
              sock put them all to shame. Before the tests I would have bet money
              that the every one of the ideas I had would work better than the socks
              and not require the user to do anything. A D-ring or an oval ring might
              work where the 1.5" circular descender ring didn't because they might
              be 'steep enough' to overcome the sag angle of the hammock.

              Youngblood


              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "gear_collector"
              <dwadsworth@m...> wrote:
              > Sorry to be jumping in the conversation at this point, but would
              > something as simple as a thick rubber band looped tightly around the
              > hammock line do the trick? I envision a large and wide rubber band
              > wrapped around the line many times in the same spot to build up a sort
              > of rubber washer, making the water have to travel uphill to get by.
              > The band couldn't become saturated and it would seem the water would
              > be forced to drip of the lower end, or am I all wet on this one?
              >
              > David
            • Rick
              Very nice experiment Dave! Thanks for sharing it. Rick ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 7, 2005
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                Very nice experiment Dave! Thanks for sharing it.

                Rick

                Dave Womble wrote:

                > Marta,
                >
                > After your first post, I happened to be looking a webbing for tree
                > attachments... so I looked at the rain issue as well. I just used a
                > hose pipe with the water turned low and put the water on the trees
                > (one smooth bark and one rough bark) just above the webbing...
                > figured this would be about as bad as it could get, was on demand and
                > somewhat repeatable. Note that I just used 1" polypropylene webbing
                > I got at WalMart, from the weight I'm guessing about 490 lb breaking
                > strength. I tried several things; other pieces of webbing sewn as
                > drip stoppers, a 1.5 inch descender ring in between webbing, bowline
                > knot finishing off non-cinching wraps around the tree and socks tied
                > to the webbing. Nothing worked as well as the synthetic material
                > socks-- all the other techniques were dependent on orientation, the
                > rate at which the water came down the webbing and/or how long it had
                > been coming down the webbing (they sometimes seemed to perform a
                > little differently when they were saturated). I was particularly
                > disappointed in the 1.5" descender rings (about 1/2 ounce each?) as I
                > thought for sure they would totally solve the problem; they didn't
                > have enough 'uphill' to them because of the hammock sag angle to
                > handle anything more than drips; they couldn't handle higher volumes
                > of water, it that case the stream of water would bridge it.
                >
                > Just thought I would pass this along, good luck with your testing.
                >
                > Youngblood
                >
                >
                >
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