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Beginner's Question on Sleeping Arms

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  • robbertbos
    Yesterday I bought an inexpensive hammock. To figure out if I could sleep in a hammock at all. If so, I ll buy a real one . Mine is a 30 euro Amazonas
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 14, 2005
      Yesterday I bought an inexpensive hammock. To figure out if I could sleep in a hammock
      at all. If so, I'll buy a "real one".
      Mine is a 30 euro Amazonas Moskito-Traveller. Can be used on both sides: with & without
      the mosquito net. It has no ropes, so I took a few hours before I had it hanging the right
      way (and height) on my Amsterdam balcony. Of course it took me hours to fall asleep, as
      there are so many things to do... Adjust the pillow, draw myself up as I want my head to
      be much higher than the rest, making it cooler, making it warmer, trying this and that...

      When I awoke after an hour, everything was comfy except for my numb, sleeping arms &
      hands. That was the main problem for the rest of the night, in every position I tried: on
      back, sides, something in between, stretched lengthwise, diagonally, fetus position, yogi
      position, etc. Strangely enough: both arms would be effected when lying on one side.

      Finally I brought in my fat Thermarest. Result: less numbness, very warm, and comfy at
      first. But when I woke up, I found that I & the Therma had slipped into weird positions.
      When I got out, my back felt like it had been twisted and wrung painfully. The mat didn't
      look like somebody been in a healthy position at all. I don't want to travel with a big mat
      anyway.

      I remember having a similar circulation problem long ago when I slept on a waterbed. Had
      to throw it out just because of that.

      I'm a skinny guy, no protective layer of fat & meat, so maybe the hammock's hugging
      effect works directly on the nerves of my shoulder/arm?

      Anybody has a similar experience? Tips on how to solve this? By the way: eating more does
      not help :)

      Robbert
    • zippydooda
      Were you using a pillow? I think that might help. Bill in Houston ... numb, sleeping arms & ... position I tried: on ... fetus position, yogi ... lying on one
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 14, 2005
        Were you using a pillow? I think that might help.

        Bill in Houston

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "robbertbos" <r.bos@c...> wrote:
        > > When I awoke after an hour, everything was comfy except for my
        numb, sleeping arms &
        > hands. That was the main problem for the rest of the night, in every
        position I tried: on
        > back, sides, something in between, stretched lengthwise, diagonally,
        fetus position, yogi
        > position, etc. Strangely enough: both arms would be effected when
        lying on one side.
        >
        > I'm a skinny guy, no protective layer of fat & meat, so maybe the
        hammock's hugging
        > effect works directly on the nerves of my shoulder/arm?
        >
        > Robbert
      • Banjo Doje
        Yup - he used a pillow - Of course it took me hours to fall asleep, as there are so many things to do... Adjust the pillow, draw myself up as I want my head
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 14, 2005
          Yup - he used a pillow - "Of course it took me hours to fall asleep, as
          there are so many things to do... Adjust the pillow, draw myself up as
          I want my head to
          be much higher than the rest, making it cooler, making it warmer,
          trying this and that..."

          Jodi, helping Bill ;-)

          On 7/14/05, zippydooda <zippydooda@...> wrote:
          > Were you using a pillow? I think that might help.
          >
          > Bill in Houston
          >

          --
          "If it ain't got a Banjo in it, it ain't Bluegrass!" - Ed Bolton
        • zippydooda
          Sigh. Thanks. Bill in Houston ... as
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 14, 2005
            Sigh. Thanks.

            Bill in Houston

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Banjo Doje <bpskids@g...> wrote:
            > Yup - he used a pillow - "Of course it took me hours to fall asleep,
            as
            > there are so many things to do... Adjust the pillow, draw myself up as
            > I want my head to
            > be much higher than the rest, making it cooler, making it warmer,
            > trying this and that..."
            >
            > Jodi, helping Bill ;-)
            >
            > On 7/14/05, zippydooda <zippydooda@y...> wrote:
            > > Were you using a pillow? I think that might help.
            > >
            > > Bill in Houston
            > >
            >
            > --
            > "If it ain't got a Banjo in it, it ain't Bluegrass!" - Ed Bolton
          • Sandy Kramer
            Hi, Robert...if you ll find my introduction (newbie from Miami s set-up), you can find the info about the Byer micro-rope that I bought to go with my Moskito
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 15, 2005
              Hi, Robert...if you'll find my introduction (newbie from Miami's set-up), you can find the info about the Byer micro-rope that I bought to go with my Moskito Traveler.

              And I also posted how how comfortable I was and kept reading and dozing off all morning.

              However, I do have the numbness and tingling all the time when I sleep on a regular bed. I also noticed that for the past year I have been dropping things a lot. Doesn't matter what size they are.

              I mentioned this to my dr. and he said, "Maybe you have carpal tunnel syndrome." I went to the neurologist and that is pretty much what it appears to be. I missed the appt. for the electrical "test" but didn't bother to reschedule because I am not about to have the surgery at this stage.

              Anyway, you may want to check with your physician about that possibility.

              PS Ed, thanks for the welcome. (didn't want to clutter the board with this).

              robbertbos <r.bos@...> wrote:
              Yesterday I bought an inexpensive hammock. To figure out if I could sleep in a hammock
              at all. If so, I'll buy a "real one".
              Mine is a 30 euro Amazonas Moskito-Traveller. Can be used on both sides: with & without
              the mosquito net. It has no ropes, so I took a few hours before I had it hanging the right
              way (and height) on my Amsterdam balcony. Of course it took me hours to fall asleep, as
              there are so many things to do... Adjust the pillow, draw myself up as I want my head to
              be much higher than the rest, making it cooler, making it warmer, trying this and that...

              When I awoke after an hour, everything was comfy except for my numb, sleeping arms &
              hands. That was the main problem for the rest of the night, in every position I tried: on
              back, sides, something in between, stretched lengthwise, diagonally, fetus position, yogi
              position, etc. Strangely enough: both arms would be effected when lying on one side.

              Finally I brought in my fat Thermarest. Result: less numbness, very warm, and comfy at
              first. But when I woke up, I found that I & the Therma had slipped into weird positions.
              When I got out, my back felt like it had been twisted and wrung painfully. The mat didn't
              look like somebody been in a healthy position at all. I don't want to travel with a big mat
              anyway.

              I remember having a similar circulation problem long ago when I slept on a waterbed. Had
              to throw it out just because of that.

              I'm a skinny guy, no protective layer of fat & meat, so maybe the hammock's hugging
              effect works directly on the nerves of my shoulder/arm?

              Anybody has a similar experience? Tips on how to solve this? By the way: eating more does
              not help :)

              Robbert




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            • Dylan Anderson
              Hi Robbert, First off, welcome to the community. And also let me say that talking with a physician as another suggested is a good idea. But that said, here
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 19, 2005
                Hi Robbert,

                First off, welcome to the community. And also let me
                say that talking with a physician as another suggested
                is a good idea. But that said, here is a similar
                experience I had and the result I came to.

                As to your experience so far, I think there are a
                couple of issues at work. First is the shape of the
                hammock. Somebody correct me if I am wrong, but as I
                understand, that Amazonas hammock is rather rounded in
                it's lay and it does curl up rather tighter than the
                ones most of us use. By that I am talking about the
                "banana boat" effect, as compared to the Speer or
                Hennessy types which are designed to be much flatter
                and more open inside. For this reason, it is
                certainly possible that the waterbed like cocooning on
                your lower half is contributing to some restriction of
                the blood vessels particularly in your shoulders
                leading to the numbness of your hands.

                The second issue could be how you are used to laying
                in your bed. All my life I have slept sort of halfway
                between my side and my stomach. It is a little hard
                to describe, but basically imagine laying on your side
                and then extend your top leg (Left leg if you are
                laying on your right side) out infront of your body.
                When I slept like this, it also necessitated having my
                arm (right arm if on my right side) fully extended
                under my pillow. I had layed like this so long
                because it was the only way I could get to sleep in a
                bed, that this is how I started laying in my Hennessy.
                What I found very rapidly is that my arm that was
                under my pillow would go numb very quick because it
                was rather far up the slope of the fabric. More
                important, I found that my other arm (left staying
                with the example) would start to go numb later too,
                and I believed it was due to a sort of pinching of my
                shoulders that would result from my lower arm being so
                high up.

                How did I fix this? Well there were two parts.
                First, I found that unlike my bed, I can be
                comfortable enough on my back in my hammock, as well
                as full out on my stomach, and several other ways in
                between. I set about re-training my body to fall
                asleep in these other positions and that sort of
                worked. I say sort of because I would occasionally
                wake up to find I had shift back on my side, with one
                arm high up and both going numb again. Guess old
                habits really do die hard! I determined I must do
                something else, and quickly I found that due to the
                flexable, moldable nature of the hammock, I could
                actually fold my arm under the pillow, which also
                helped to elevate my shoulders a bit and cured the
                numbing entirely. Also, the fact that my arm is sort
                of trapped prevents me from extending it in my sleep.
                The only dissadvantage to this is that I do wake up
                once or twice a night to switch sides, but I would
                gladly accept that over long term damage from poor
                circulation.

                Hope some of this helps, and happy hanging!

                Though I may die tomorrow, at least I can do it with the knowledge that once I did know true love -unknown




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