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[Hammock Camping] Re: 2nd Outing (tree distance)

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  • Dave Womble
    ... feet ... the same ... force ... Things get more complicated if you don t tie it off with the same amount of webbing/rope length on each end of the hammock,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, hiking@w... wrote:
      >
      > Hmmm, interesting thought. That may have solved the problem with my
      feet
      > being higher (much) than my head. Even though I had the straps at
      the same
      > height on both trees, that doesn't mean the trees were level to each
      > other.
      >
      > As to the tension, may have had something to do with the amount of
      force
      > pushing downward from under the ridgeline. ;-)
      >
      > mike

      Things get more complicated if you don't tie it off with the same
      amount of webbing/rope length on each end of the hammock, this is
      sometimes refered to as centering the hammock. If it is not centered
      the short end tends to be higher when you are in the hammock even if
      it is level when you aren't in the hammock... this is almost as
      much 'fun' as using webbing/rope that has a lot of stretch in it when
      it is loaded but returns to its original length when you remove the
      load (ie, get in and out of the hammock).

      Dave
    • Dave Womble
      ... Ralph, When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with or
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
        wrote:

        > Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
        > and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
        > surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.
        >
        > Ralph
        >

        Ralph,

        When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in
        the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with
        or without a mechanical advantage, depending on a couple of angles.
        One angle is the hammock sag angle and the other angle is the angle of
        the suppension ropes. If you are using the backpacker Asym I think you
        are trying to lift more than your weight when the angle of the
        suppension ropes are less than 22 to 23 degrees (relative to the
        horizon)... when the angle is around 30 degrees you are only trying to
        lift a quarter of your body weight, so the amount of force changes
        pretty fast.

        Dave
      • Ralph Oborn
        Yeah, I should ve run a statics analysis, And as Mike so delicately put it, that can be a lot of weight. I was just trying to get a feel for the stress on
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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          Yeah, I should've run a statics analysis,
          And as Mike so delicately put it, that can be a lot of weight.
          I was just trying to get a feel for the stress on Coy's caribiner


          On 6/27/05, Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote:
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
          > > and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
          > > surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.
          > >
          > > Ralph
          > >
          >
          > Ralph,
          >
          > When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in
          > the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with
          > or without a mechanical advantage, depending on a couple of angles.
          > One angle is the hammock sag angle and the other angle is the angle of
          > the suppension ropes. If you are using the backpacker Asym I think you
          > are trying to lift more than your weight when the angle of the
          > suppension ropes are less than 22 to 23 degrees (relative to the
          > horizon)... when the angle is around 30 degrees you are only trying to
          > lift a quarter of your body weight, so the amount of force changes
          > pretty fast.
          >
          > Dave
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Scot Leibacher
          Ralph, I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed how bad I am at eyeballing whether things are level. ... From: Ralph Oborn
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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            Ralph,
            I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed how bad I am
            at "eyeballing" whether things are level.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ralph Oborn
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, June 27, 2005 1:55 PM
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: 2nd Outing (tree distance)


            You can move the staff from had to hand (as needed).
            I'm considering putting a mason's line level on my ridgeline to help
            me get the angles of the dangles about right.

            Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
            and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
            surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.

            Ralph


            On 6/27/05, hiking@... <hiking@...> wrote:
            > Works if you use two poles, I use a staff. I'll have to find out what the
            > distance is with a single staff, but I am getting the idea that around
            > 12-13 feet is ideal.
            >
            > mike
            >
            >


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          • Bruce W. Calkins
            And here I thought that was my own method! It works well with my Hennessy. Bruce W. (Black Wolfe) ... -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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              And here I thought that was my own method!

              It works well with my Hennessy.

              Bruce W. (Black Wolfe)


              > I found the hiking pole method to be quite nice (forgot who suggested it).
              > Standing between two trees extend both poles outward and that is a
              > good distance.
              > Scott



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            • Ralph Oborn
              ... Great minds..... Ralph
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                > Ralph,
                > I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed
                > how bad I am
                > at "eyeballing" whether things are level.

                Great minds.....

                Ralph
              • Palefrei
                I had occasion to need to swap out my fly on my Hennessy Hammock. First... I don t think I ever got either a timely reply or a reply that wasn t an
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 28, 2005
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                  I had occasion to need to swap out my fly on my Hennessy
                  Hammock.

                  First... I don't think I ever got either a timely reply or
                  a reply that wasn't an automatically generated one from any
                  companies online email address. Hennessy answered it the
                  same day, with a live person.

                  Second... After I mailed the fly, supplying the tracking
                  number to them, they cross-shipped the replacement without
                  waiting to receive mine.

                  Third... They supplied the tracking number to me.

                  Very friendly service.
                  Cant ask for much more (Except free samples!)
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