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2nd Outing

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  • Mike Lipay
    I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went great! (sorry, no pictures) The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 26, 2005
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      I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went
      great! (sorry, no pictures)

      The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held well;
      the bug net did an excellent job of keeping the nasties out.

      I did have a few problems that still need worked out, any help would
      be appreciated.

      Bug net: I assume that people here trim the ends of the material to
      make it easier to fasten the netting to the ends of the hammock. How
      far back from the ends do you cut it, and how much material do you
      leave to fasten the netting?

      Distance: Is there an optimum range between the two trees? I had a
      difficult time finding two trees this weekend, in the area I was in
      most of the trees had poison ivy vines. The two trees I did use were
      10-feet apart, this wound up being too close together.

      thanks,

      mike
    • Coy
      No help on the nessting question. on the distance, I dont know the exact footge. 5 normal paces seems to work great for me. 4 is really too close, 6 is OK,
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 26, 2005
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        No help on the nessting question. on the distance, I dont know the
        exact footge. 5 normal paces seems to work great for me. 4 is really
        too close, 6 is OK, any more is pushing it, makeing it difficult to
        keep the hammock off the ground. so unless you have an extreemly long
        or short sride, 5 paces should be a good starting point for picking
        out trees.

        Coy Boy


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Mike Lipay <hiking@w...> wrote:
        > I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went
        > great! (sorry, no pictures)
        >
        > The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held well;
        > the bug net did an excellent job of keeping the nasties out.
        >
        > I did have a few problems that still need worked out, any help would
        > be appreciated.
        >
        > Bug net: I assume that people here trim the ends of the material to
        > make it easier to fasten the netting to the ends of the hammock. How
        > far back from the ends do you cut it, and how much material do you
        > leave to fasten the netting?
        >
        > Distance: Is there an optimum range between the two trees? I had a
        > difficult time finding two trees this weekend, in the area I was in
        > most of the trees had poison ivy vines. The two trees I did use were
        > 10-feet apart, this wound up being too close together.
        >
        > thanks,
        >
        > mike
      • Scott Schroeder
        I found the hiking pole method to be quite nice (forgot who suggested it). Standing between two trees extend both poles outward and that is a good distance.
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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          I found the hiking pole method to be quite nice (forgot who suggested it).
          Standing between two trees extend both poles outward and that is a
          good distance.
          Scott

          On 6/26/05, Coy <starnescr@...> wrote:
          > No help on the nessting question. on the distance, I dont know the
          > exact footge. 5 normal paces seems to work great for me. 4 is really
          > too close, 6 is OK, any more is pushing it, makeing it difficult to
          > keep the hammock off the ground. so unless you have an extreemly long
          > or short sride, 5 paces should be a good starting point for picking
          > out trees.
          >
          > Coy Boy
        • Dave Womble
          ... well; ... would ... to ... How ... in ... were ... Mike, About the bugnet, I m not sure what arrangement you are using. There are several schemes folks
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Mike Lipay <hiking@w...> wrote:
            > I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went
            > great! (sorry, no pictures)
            >
            > The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held
            well;
            > the bug net did an excellent job of keeping the nasties out.
            >
            > I did have a few problems that still need worked out, any help
            would
            > be appreciated.
            >
            > Bug net: I assume that people here trim the ends of the material
            to
            > make it easier to fasten the netting to the ends of the hammock.
            How
            > far back from the ends do you cut it, and how much material do you
            > leave to fasten the netting?
            >
            > Distance: Is there an optimum range between the two trees? I had a
            > difficult time finding two trees this weekend, in the area I was
            in
            > most of the trees had poison ivy vines. The two trees I did use
            were
            > 10-feet apart, this wound up being too close together.
            >
            > thanks,
            >
            > mike
            Mike,

            About the bugnet, I'm not sure what arrangement you are using. There
            are several schemes folks use for their bugnet. I use the technique
            that Ed Speer uses on his hammocks and describes in his Hammock
            Camping book. Do you have the book and is that the technique you are
            using?

            About the distance between the two trees, the hiking pole technique
            described previously is an excellenct technique that gives you a
            quick and easy reference of about 12 feet (at least for my wingspan
            and pole length). I believe Ray Garlington may have been the person
            that first suggested that? Anyway, your minimum spacing, or distance
            between two trees, is primarily determined by your tarp length. If
            your tarp is 10' feet long you are going to need a spacing that is a
            little longer than that, maybe 11 or 12 feet.

            Maximum distance is a little more complicated because you have be
            able to reach high enough to tie it high enough to keep the hammock
            off the ground and have long enough ropes/webbing to go around the
            trees. Usually for me the maximum distance is 18 feet, but with
            trees that aren't over a foot in diameter because I don't have enough
            rope to wrap around the tree and tie off.

            I use tarps that are almost 11 feet long so I look for spacing that
            is between 12 to 15 feet and will settle for 18 feet if the tree
            diameters are less than a foot. And tree diameter is always a
            factor, the circumference is a little over 3 times the diameter. I
            believe I have about 11 feet of rope on each end of my 8.5 Speer
            hammock to tie off with; my quick calculations tell me that I would
            have a hard time with anything over a 2 foot diameter tree at a
            spacing of 12 feet.

            It isn't as complicated as it sounds, with my setup I look for trees
            that are less than a foot in diameter that are preferable 12 to 15
            feet apart (and don't have poison ivy, dead limbs or stuff in between
            that I can't deal with). If I don't see that I look for up to 18
            feet spacing options and/or trees up to 2 feet in diameter; then I do
            a little figuring and see what I can make that work.

            Dave
          • hiking@westernpa.us
            ... I have the book, but I m using Rick s setup. I know, somwhere on the site, he says to cut it back, but I can t find the page again, and I had a little
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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              > Mike,
              >
              > About the bugnet, I'm not sure what arrangement you are using. There
              > are several schemes folks use for their bugnet. I use the technique
              > that Ed Speer uses on his hammocks and describes in his Hammock
              > Camping book. Do you have the book and is that the technique you are
              > using?

              I have the book, but I'm using Rick's setup. I know, somwhere on the site,
              he says to cut it back, but I can't find the page again, and I had a
              little trouble visualizing what he was saying.


              > I use tarps that are almost 11 feet long so I look for spacing that
              > is between 12 to 15 feet and will settle for 18 feet if the tree
              > diameters are less than a foot. And tree diameter is always a
              > factor, the circumference is a little over 3 times the diameter. I
              > believe I have about 11 feet of rope on each end of my 8.5 Speer
              > hammock to tie off with; my quick calculations tell me that I would
              > have a hard time with anything over a 2 foot diameter tree at a
              > spacing of 12 feet.
              >
              > Dave

              Based on what you, and others, have said I'm getting the feel for 12-15 as
              the size I need, the hammock is around 10-feet end to end.

              mike
            • Rick
              I used to pace the distance, but now find it much easier to do something originally suggested by Ray Garlington. I hold my hiking poles in my hands. If I can
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                I used to pace the distance, but now find it much easier to do something
                originally suggested by Ray Garlington. I hold my hiking poles in my
                hands. If I can touch the trees with the ends of the poles they are
                close enough to use. If I touch one tree with the end of a pole and can
                touch the other with my hand, the two trees are too close.

                Rick

                Coy wrote:

                > No help on the nessting question. on the distance, I dont know the
                > exact footge. 5 normal paces seems to work great for me. 4 is really
                > too close, 6 is OK, any more is pushing it, makeing it difficult to
                > keep the hammock off the ground. so unless you have an extreemly long
                > or short sride, 5 paces should be a good starting point for picking
                > out trees.
                >
                > Coy Boy
                >
                >
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Mike Lipay <hiking@w...> wrote:
                > > I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went
                > > great! (sorry, no pictures)
                > >
                > > The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held well;
                > > the bug net did an excellent job of keeping the nasties out.
                > >
                > > I did have a few problems that still need worked out, any help would
                > > be appreciated.
                > >
                > > Bug net: I assume that people here trim the ends of the material to
                > > make it easier to fasten the netting to the ends of the hammock. How
                > > far back from the ends do you cut it, and how much material do you
                > > leave to fasten the netting?
                > >
                > > Distance: Is there an optimum range between the two trees? I had a
                > > difficult time finding two trees this weekend, in the area I was in
                > > most of the trees had poison ivy vines. The two trees I did use were
                > > 10-feet apart, this wound up being too close together.
                > >
                > > thanks,
                > >
                > > mike
                >
                >
                >
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              • hiking@westernpa.us
                Works if you use two poles, I use a staff. I ll have to find out what the distance is with a single staff, but I am getting the idea that around 12-13 feet is
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                  Works if you use two poles, I use a staff. I'll have to find out what the
                  distance is with a single staff, but I am getting the idea that around
                  12-13 feet is ideal.

                  mike


                  > I used to pace the distance, but now find it much easier to do something
                  > originally suggested by Ray Garlington. I hold my hiking poles in my
                  > hands. If I can touch the trees with the ends of the poles they are
                  > close enough to use. If I touch one tree with the end of a pole and can
                  > touch the other with my hand, the two trees are too close.
                  >
                  > Rick
                  >
                  > Coy wrote:
                  >
                  >> No help on the nessting question. on the distance, I dont know the
                  >> exact footge. 5 normal paces seems to work great for me. 4 is really
                  >> too close, 6 is OK, any more is pushing it, makeing it difficult to
                  >> keep the hammock off the ground. so unless you have an extreemly long
                  >> or short sride, 5 paces should be a good starting point for picking
                  >> out trees.
                  >>
                  >> Coy Boy
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Mike Lipay <hiking@w...> wrote:
                  >> > I had my 2nd outing this weekend with my hammock and things went
                  >> > great! (sorry, no pictures)
                  >> >
                  >> > The strapping system I came up with worked perfectly, and held well;
                  >> > the bug net did an excellent job of keeping the nasties out.
                  >> >
                  >> > I did have a few problems that still need worked out, any help would
                  >> > be appreciated.
                  >> >
                  >> > Bug net: I assume that people here trim the ends of the material to
                  >> > make it easier to fasten the netting to the ends of the hammock. How
                  >> > far back from the ends do you cut it, and how much material do you
                  >> > leave to fasten the netting?
                  >> >
                  >> > Distance: Is there an optimum range between the two trees? I had a
                  >> > difficult time finding two trees this weekend, in the area I was in
                  >> > most of the trees had poison ivy vines. The two trees I did use were
                  >> > 10-feet apart, this wound up being too close together.
                  >> >
                  >> > thanks,
                  >> >
                  >> > mike
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >> YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >>
                  >> * Visit your group "hammockcamping
                  >> <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping>" on the web.
                  >>
                  >> * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >> hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >> <mailto:hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                  >>
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                  >> Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Ralph Oborn
                  You can move the staff from had to hand (as needed). I m considering putting a mason s line level on my ridgeline to help me get the angles of the dangles
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                    You can move the staff from had to hand (as needed).
                    I'm considering putting a mason's line level on my ridgeline to help
                    me get the angles of the dangles about right.

                    Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
                    and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
                    surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.

                    Ralph


                    On 6/27/05, hiking@... <hiking@...> wrote:
                    > Works if you use two poles, I use a staff. I'll have to find out what the
                    > distance is with a single staff, but I am getting the idea that around
                    > 12-13 feet is ideal.
                    >
                    > mike
                    >
                    >
                  • hiking@westernpa.us
                    ... Hmmm, interesting thought. That may have solved the problem with my feet being higher (much) than my head. Even though I had the straps at the same height
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                      > You can move the staff from had to hand (as needed).
                      > I'm considering putting a mason's line level on my ridgeline to help
                      > me get the angles of the dangles about right.
                      >
                      > Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
                      > and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
                      > surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.
                      >
                      > Ralph

                      Hmmm, interesting thought. That may have solved the problem with my feet
                      being higher (much) than my head. Even though I had the straps at the same
                      height on both trees, that doesn't mean the trees were level to each
                      other.

                      As to the tension, may have had something to do with the amount of force
                      pushing downward from under the ridgeline. ;-)

                      mike
                    • Dave Womble
                      ... feet ... the same ... force ... Things get more complicated if you don t tie it off with the same amount of webbing/rope length on each end of the hammock,
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, hiking@w... wrote:
                        >
                        > Hmmm, interesting thought. That may have solved the problem with my
                        feet
                        > being higher (much) than my head. Even though I had the straps at
                        the same
                        > height on both trees, that doesn't mean the trees were level to each
                        > other.
                        >
                        > As to the tension, may have had something to do with the amount of
                        force
                        > pushing downward from under the ridgeline. ;-)
                        >
                        > mike

                        Things get more complicated if you don't tie it off with the same
                        amount of webbing/rope length on each end of the hammock, this is
                        sometimes refered to as centering the hammock. If it is not centered
                        the short end tends to be higher when you are in the hammock even if
                        it is level when you aren't in the hammock... this is almost as
                        much 'fun' as using webbing/rope that has a lot of stretch in it when
                        it is loaded but returns to its original length when you remove the
                        load (ie, get in and out of the hammock).

                        Dave
                      • Dave Womble
                        ... Ralph, When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with or
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
                          wrote:

                          > Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
                          > and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
                          > surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.
                          >
                          > Ralph
                          >

                          Ralph,

                          When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in
                          the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with
                          or without a mechanical advantage, depending on a couple of angles.
                          One angle is the hammock sag angle and the other angle is the angle of
                          the suppension ropes. If you are using the backpacker Asym I think you
                          are trying to lift more than your weight when the angle of the
                          suppension ropes are less than 22 to 23 degrees (relative to the
                          horizon)... when the angle is around 30 degrees you are only trying to
                          lift a quarter of your body weight, so the amount of force changes
                          pretty fast.

                          Dave
                        • Ralph Oborn
                          Yeah, I should ve run a statics analysis, And as Mike so delicately put it, that can be a lot of weight. I was just trying to get a feel for the stress on
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                            Yeah, I should've run a statics analysis,
                            And as Mike so delicately put it, that can be a lot of weight.
                            I was just trying to get a feel for the stress on Coy's caribiner


                            On 6/27/05, Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote:
                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
                            > wrote:
                            >
                            > > Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
                            > > and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
                            > > surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.
                            > >
                            > > Ralph
                            > >
                            >
                            > Ralph,
                            >
                            > When you are in your hammock like that and try to make some slack in
                            > the ridgeline, you are basically trying to lift your body weight with
                            > or without a mechanical advantage, depending on a couple of angles.
                            > One angle is the hammock sag angle and the other angle is the angle of
                            > the suppension ropes. If you are using the backpacker Asym I think you
                            > are trying to lift more than your weight when the angle of the
                            > suppension ropes are less than 22 to 23 degrees (relative to the
                            > horizon)... when the angle is around 30 degrees you are only trying to
                            > lift a quarter of your body weight, so the amount of force changes
                            > pretty fast.
                            >
                            > Dave
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
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                          • Scot Leibacher
                            Ralph, I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed how bad I am at eyeballing whether things are level. ... From: Ralph Oborn
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                              Ralph,
                              I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed how bad I am
                              at "eyeballing" whether things are level.

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Ralph Oborn
                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Monday, June 27, 2005 1:55 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: 2nd Outing (tree distance)


                              You can move the staff from had to hand (as needed).
                              I'm considering putting a mason's line level on my ridgeline to help
                              me get the angles of the dangles about right.

                              Last weekend O was out with my scouts... While in my HH I reached up
                              and tried to make some slack in the ridgeline, couldn't do it. It's is
                              surprising the amount of tension that a HH ridgeline carries.

                              Ralph


                              On 6/27/05, hiking@... <hiking@...> wrote:
                              > Works if you use two poles, I use a staff. I'll have to find out what the
                              > distance is with a single staff, but I am getting the idea that around
                              > 12-13 feet is ideal.
                              >
                              > mike
                              >
                              >


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                            • Bruce W. Calkins
                              And here I thought that was my own method! It works well with my Hennessy. Bruce W. (Black Wolfe) ... -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                                And here I thought that was my own method!

                                It works well with my Hennessy.

                                Bruce W. (Black Wolfe)


                                > I found the hiking pole method to be quite nice (forgot who suggested it).
                                > Standing between two trees extend both poles outward and that is a
                                > good distance.
                                > Scott



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                              • Ralph Oborn
                                ... Great minds..... Ralph
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jun 27, 2005
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                                  > Ralph,
                                  > I use a cheapo line level on mine and it works great. I am always amazed
                                  > how bad I am
                                  > at "eyeballing" whether things are level.

                                  Great minds.....

                                  Ralph
                                • Palefrei
                                  I had occasion to need to swap out my fly on my Hennessy Hammock. First... I don t think I ever got either a timely reply or a reply that wasn t an
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 28, 2005
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                                    I had occasion to need to swap out my fly on my Hennessy
                                    Hammock.

                                    First... I don't think I ever got either a timely reply or
                                    a reply that wasn't an automatically generated one from any
                                    companies online email address. Hennessy answered it the
                                    same day, with a live person.

                                    Second... After I mailed the fly, supplying the tracking
                                    number to them, they cross-shipped the replacement without
                                    waiting to receive mine.

                                    Third... They supplied the tracking number to me.

                                    Very friendly service.
                                    Cant ask for much more (Except free samples!)
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