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porch hammock

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  • Marta Clark
    I paid a visit to my local Wal-Mart today and, I have to say, y all must have better fabric departments in your WMs than I do in mine. No bargain bin; no
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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      I paid a visit to my local Wal-Mart today and, I have
      to say, y'all must have better fabric departments in
      your WMs than I do in mine. No bargain bin; no
      ripstop nylon; nothing of interest for outdoor sewing
      projects.

      I settled on a light-colored cotton denim for the
      porch hammock. This particular denim looks quite
      strong, and is the type of fabric which would be very
      hard to tear, so I think it will remain strong, even
      if punctured.

      There was no flat polypro line, so I ended up getting
      some polypro rope. My plan is to sew double-strength
      channels along either side of the hammock, with rope
      inside, which will feed into the hammock end knots.
      Then I'll use more rope for the lines to tie into the
      eyebolts. The heaviest polypro rope they had says its
      working load limit is 244 pounds, which is enough
      above my weight that I think it will hold me up.

      Comments? Suggestions? Cautions? Warnings? I'll
      probably start sewing this evening, and unless I hit
      some sort of huge snag, will probably finish this
      evening, too.

      BTW, the bill, including the purchase of a very large
      spool of pure polyester thread, was a few cents over
      $23. If I get a season's use out of it, I'll be
      satisfied.

      Marta

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    • Ed Speer
      Marta, my WW must be like yours. But that polypro rope you mentioned sounds too light for the job. Remember that hammocks add great stress to the hanging
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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        Marta, my WW must be like yours. But that polypro rope you mentioned sounds
        too light for the job. Remember that hammocks add great stress to the
        hanging ropes—several times more than the static weight of the user.
        However, most polypro rope has a higher breaking strength than the 244 lbs
        you mentioned—maybe check it again…? I thought most ½ to ¾” polypro rope
        had a much higher breaking strength. Anyway, I’d recommend at least a
        breaking strength of 700 lbs for each hanging rope or strap. ….Ed



        Moderator, Hammock Camping List
        Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

        Editor, Hammock Camping News

        Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



        _____

        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Marta Clark
        Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2005 12:49 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] porch hammock



        I paid a visit to my local Wal-Mart today and, I have
        to say, y'all must have better fabric departments in
        your WMs than I do in mine. No bargain bin; no
        ripstop nylon; nothing of interest for outdoor sewing
        projects.

        I settled on a light-colored cotton denim for the
        porch hammock. This particular denim looks quite
        strong, and is the type of fabric which would be very
        hard to tear, so I think it will remain strong, even
        if punctured.

        There was no flat polypro line, so I ended up getting
        some polypro rope. My plan is to sew double-strength
        channels along either side of the hammock, with rope
        inside, which will feed into the hammock end knots.
        Then I'll use more rope for the lines to tie into the
        eyebolts. The heaviest polypro rope they had says its
        working load limit is 244 pounds, which is enough
        above my weight that I think it will hold me up.

        Comments? Suggestions? Cautions? Warnings? I'll
        probably start sewing this evening, and unless I hit
        some sort of huge snag, will probably finish this
        evening, too.

        BTW, the bill, including the purchase of a very large
        spool of pure polyester thread, was a few cents over
        $23. If I get a season's use out of it, I'll be
        satisfied.

        Marta

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      • seuss910
        Breaking strength is not the same as working load. Working load incorporates a fudge factor determined by a crack team of engineers and lawyers to keep
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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          Breaking strength is not the same as working load. Working load
          incorporates a fudge factor determined by a crack team of engineers
          and lawyers to keep themselves from getting sued when the rope
          breaks. Working load is usually 1/5 to 1/12 of minimum breaking
          strength (which is itself 2 standard deviations below "average
          breaking strength".) Line with a "working load" of 244lbs will have a
          minimum breaking strength of well over 1/2 ton.

          Marta may well break her porch before she breaks that rope.

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
          > Marta, my WW must be like yours. But that polypro rope you
          mentioned sounds
          > too light for the job. Remember that hammocks add great stress to
          the
          > hanging ropes—several times more than the static weight of the user.
          > However, most polypro rope has a higher breaking strength than the
          244 lbs
          > you mentioned—maybe check it again…? I thought most ½ to ¾"
          polypro rope
          > had a much higher breaking strength. Anyway, I'd recommend at
          least a
          > breaking strength of 700 lbs for each hanging rope or strap. ….Ed
          >
          >
          > Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2005 12:49 PM
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Hammock Camping] porch hammock
          >
          >
          > There was no flat polypro line, so I ended up getting
          > some polypro rope. My plan is to sew double-strength
          > channels along either side of the hammock, with rope
          > inside, which will feed into the hammock end knots.
          > Then I'll use more rope for the lines to tie into the
          > eyebolts. The heaviest polypro rope they had says its
          > working load limit is 244 pounds, which is enough
          > above my weight that I think it will hold me up.
          >
          > Comments? Suggestions? Cautions? Warnings? I'll
          > probably start sewing this evening, and unless I hit
          > some sort of huge snag, will probably finish this
          > evening, too.
          >
          > BTW, the bill, including the purchase of a very large
          > spool of pure polyester thread, was a few cents over
          > $23. If I get a season's use out of it, I'll be
          > satisfied.
          >
          > Marta
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          >
          > _____
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/
          >
          > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?
          subject=Unsubscribe>
          >
          > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ed Speer
          Seuss, that certainly sounds a lot more like what I expect from most polypro ropes-I didn t catch the difference between working load and breaking strength.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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            Seuss, that certainly sounds a lot more like what I expect from most polypro
            ropes-I didn't catch the difference between working load and breaking
            strength. Guess I'd much rather have the actual breaking strength number.
            You give marketers a lot more credit for concern over customer safety (i.e.
            law suits) than I do.

            Anyway, thanks for clearing up the problem. Do you have some standard
            source for your definitions? ..Ed



            Moderator, Hammock Camping List
            Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

            Editor, Hammock Camping News

            Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



            _____

            From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of seuss910
            Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2005 5:33 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] porch hammock



            Breaking strength is not the same as working load. Working load
            incorporates a fudge factor determined by a crack team of engineers
            and lawyers to keep themselves from getting sued when the rope
            breaks. Working load is usually 1/5 to 1/12 of minimum breaking
            strength (which is itself 2 standard deviations below "average
            breaking strength".) Line with a "working load" of 244lbs will have a
            minimum breaking strength of well over 1/2 ton.

            Marta may well break her porch before she breaks that rope.






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • seuss910
            Ahhhh, you re just hoping that I ll refer folks to some obscure bondage website. Sorry. I ll just refer you to the Cordage Institute s Fiber Rope Inspection
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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              Ahhhh, you're just hoping that I'll refer folks to some obscure
              bondage website. Sorry. I'll just refer you to the Cordage
              Institute's "Fiber Rope Inspection and Retirement Criteria"
              (International Guideline 2001-04)

              If you're REALLY bored, you may also be interested in

              CI 2003 - Fiber Properties (Physical, Mechanical and Environmental)
              for Cable, Cordage, Rope and Twine.

              CI 1202 - Terminology for Fiber Rope

              CI 1500 - Test Methods for Fiber Ropes

              CIB 1.4 - Fiber Rope Technical Information Manual

              All published by the Cordage Institute (www.ropecord.com)

              If you're more interested in the standards for your webbing, I'd
              refer you to the Web Sling and Tie Down Association (www.wstda.com)
              Their standards for webbing were last published in 1998. Revised
              standards are to be published this year.

              Anybody still awake after reading that? No? Didn't think so.

              -s

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
              > Seuss, that certainly sounds a lot more like what I expect from
              most polypro
              > ropes-I didn't catch the difference between working load and
              breaking
              > strength. Guess I'd much rather have the actual breaking strength
              number.
              > You give marketers a lot more credit for concern over customer
              safety (i.e.
              > law suits) than I do.
              >
              > Anyway, thanks for clearing up the problem. Do you have some
              standard
              > source for your definitions? ..Ed
              >
            • Ed Speer
              You re too much seuss---thanks.ed Moderator, Hammock Camping List Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide Editor, Hammock Camping News Owner, Speer
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 19, 2005
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                You're too much seuss---thanks.ed



                Moderator, Hammock Camping List
                Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

                Editor, Hammock Camping News

                Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



                _____

                From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                On Behalf Of seuss910
                Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2005 9:28 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: porch hammock



                Ahhhh, you're just hoping that I'll refer folks to some obscure
                bondage website. Sorry. I'll just refer you to the Cordage
                Institute's "Fiber Rope Inspection and Retirement Criteria"
                (International Guideline 2001-04)

                If you're REALLY bored, you may also be interested in

                CI 2003 - Fiber Properties (Physical, Mechanical and Environmental)
                for Cable, Cordage, Rope and Twine.

                CI 1202 - Terminology for Fiber Rope

                CI 1500 - Test Methods for Fiber Ropes

                CIB 1.4 - Fiber Rope Technical Information Manual

                All published by the Cordage Institute (www.ropecord.com)

                If you're more interested in the standards for your webbing, I'd
                refer you to the Web Sling and Tie Down Association (www.wstda.com)
                Their standards for webbing were last published in 1998. Revised
                standards are to be published this year.

                Anybody still awake after reading that? No? Didn't think so.

                -s

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
                > Seuss, that certainly sounds a lot more like what I expect from
                most polypro
                > ropes-I didn't catch the difference between working load and
                breaking
                > strength. Guess I'd much rather have the actual breaking strength
                number.
                > You give marketers a lot more credit for concern over customer
                safety (i.e.
                > law suits) than I do.
                >
                > Anyway, thanks for clearing up the problem. Do you have some
                standard
                > source for your definitions? ..Ed
                >






                _____

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