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Re: technical terminology, materials in hammocks

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  • geoflyfisher
    Robi, I am always glad to see someone learning how to sew their own gear. Sorry to say I don t know enough Hungarian to find the toilet, much less technical
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1 11:33 AM
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      Robi,

      I am always glad to see someone learning how to sew their own gear.
      Sorry to say I don't know enough Hungarian to find the toilet, much
      less technical language to help you... so the following is in english
      and perhaps will help you in a fabric store.

      Ripstop nylon is a woven fabric of nylon that has thicker thread
      about every half centimeter or so in both thread directions... it
      ends up looking like there is a net of squares imbedded into the
      background material. It is often used for parachute material. It is
      breathable material, and if you put your lips up to the material, you
      can suck air through it. For hammock making, you do not need the
      lightest ripstop. Using US measures, the lightest ripstop weighs 1.1
      oz per square yard. What you are looking for is one grade heavier
      (and by far the most common) at 1.9 oz per square yard.

      silnylon starts out as 1.1 (or 1.3) oz ripstop, but is impregnated
      with silicone so it ends up weighing about 1.5 oz per square yard.
      This is really waterproof stuff which is quite slippery. It makes
      wonderful material for lots of waterproof application.

      Cordura nylon is a heavy version of woven nylon threads. It is often
      done as a "basket weave" material... that is fairly corse threads to
      make up a material which is much heavier... like the material that
      modern cloth suitcases are made from.

      All this stuff is available mail order here in the states. I presume
      once you figure out the right words it is available worldwide. It is
      not commonly found in neighborhood cloth merchants - with the
      possible exception of simple 1.9 oz ripstop. Certainly I have never
      seen either no-see-up netting or silnylon in a sewing hobby store.

      I hope this helps.

      Rick

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, robi dawson <beanco@m...>
      wrote:
      > Hi Everybody,
      >
      > Spring is here, we are setting our agendas for camping trips,
      biking trips,
      > canoe trips etc.
      >
      > just the kind of trips to finally starting hammock camping on.
      >
      > Do to various reasons, I want to make my own gear, 1. i like making
      things,
      > 2. it could be cheaper, 3. it certainly is more fun than buying.
      >
      > I have looked around the Net, been reading these posts for a few
      weeks now,
      > been told about the Speer book... this is all fine, however, i have
      a
      > problem with terminology.
      >
      > is there a Site out there that gives really easy to understand
      defs.
      > examples of all the various materials,
      >
      > rip-stop nyilon
      > silnylon
      > cordura - ok more for back packs I know...
      > the list goes on, but these are the three that come to mind.
      >
      > The reason I need to know is I have not had much luck finding this
      stuff
      > for sale here in Hungary. That means either it is not available or
      it comes
      > under a different name here... so I am on the quest to find local
      sources
      > of material but need to know the specs of the stuff to figure out
      what it
      > is called in Hungarian or to explain to the folks in the shops who
      can help
      > me....
      >
      > If all else fails I will buy on line, so the question arises, where
      to buy
      > cool modern ultra lite, ultra strong materials?
    • Bob
      1. Select the proper site. The best location is on the back side of a hill, preferably in a draw with some vegetation in the direction of the wind to help
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 1 11:52 AM
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        1. Select the proper site. The best location is on the back side of
        a hill, preferably in a draw with some vegetation in the direction of
        the wind to help wind block, get the wind to hit at an angle to the
        side, with the foot downwind. Jardine talks about katabatic air, the
        zone of cold air in vallies. He says this zone can be as great as
        100ft deep. Make sure you are above it.

        2.Choose your warmest sleeping bag, have enough extra clothes to add
        warmth. Don't forget a hat or even better a balaclava.

        3. Use the car reflector pad system as described by Sgt Rock here
        http://hikinghq.net/hammock/hammock2.html#Tip 4 Most dept stores are
        out of car reflectors this time of the year but most auto parts
        stores will have them in stock.

        4. Hey it could be colder you are in NC after all, in Pa we still
        have snow on the ground and it was 12 last night.
      • uluheman
        I haven t seen anyone mention my favorite sewing aid: the walking foot. It s a small, expensive gizmo that may or may not be available as an accessory for your
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 1 2:24 PM
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          I haven't seen anyone mention my favorite sewing aid: the walking
          foot. It's a small, expensive gizmo that may or may not be available
          as an accessory for your particular sewing machine. It replaces the
          usual presser foot and serves as a set of upper feed dogs, exactly
          synchronized to the lower feed dogs (which are the only ones most
          people ever use). Because silnylon is so slick, the lower feed dogs
          may feed the lower piece of fabric, but slippage may (will!) occur
          between the lower and upper pieces of fabric you're trying to sew,
          which causes plenty of problems. With a walking foot, you should get
          nice and even stitches because the walking foot is feeding the upper
          piece of fabric at the same rate as the lower piece, minimizing
          slippage between the two pieces. No need to pull the fabric through
          manually, either; just let the machine do the work at it's own pace,
          as it was designed to do.

          Brandon in Honolulu


          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "geoflyfisher"
          <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
          > Robi,
          >
          > I am always glad to see someone learning how to sew their own
          gear.
        • Ed Speer
          Thanks for the sewing tip Brandon--the walking foot sounds promissing. I have no experience with one, but would love to hear from anyone else who does. Any
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 2 10:24 AM
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            Message
            Thanks for the sewing tip Brandon--the walking foot sounds promissing.  I have no experience with one, but would love to hear from anyone else who does.  Any idea where to get one Brandon?  ..Ed
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: uluheman [mailto:UluheMan@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 5:25 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Hammock Camping sewing with walking foot

            I haven't seen anyone mention my favorite sewing aid: the walking
            foot. It's a small, expensive gizmo that may or may not be available
            as an accessory for your particular sewing machine. It replaces the
            usual presser foot and serves as a set of upper feed dogs, exactly
            synchronized to the lower feed dogs (which are the only ones most
            people ever use). Because silnylon is so slick, the lower feed dogs
            may feed the lower piece of fabric, but slippage may (will!) occur
            between the lower and upper pieces of fabric you're trying to sew,
            which causes plenty of problems. With a walking foot, you should get
            nice and even stitches because the walking foot is feeding the upper
            piece of fabric at the same rate as the lower piece, minimizing
            slippage between the two pieces. No need to pull the fabric through
            manually, either; just let the machine do the work at it's own pace,
            as it was designed to do.

            Brandon in Honolulu


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "geoflyfisher"
            <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
            > Robi,
            >
            > I am always glad to see someone learning how to sew their own
            gear. 




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          • uluheman
            Ed-- The walking foot is manufactured as an accessory for your machine, maybe even your model. I m pretty sure there won t be any generic devices available. If
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 2 12:20 PM
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              Ed--

              The walking foot is manufactured as an accessory for your machine,
              maybe even your model. I'm pretty sure there won't be any generic
              devices available. If you have a Bernina, check with your Bernina
              dealer. If you have a Viking, check with Viking. Etc. I know both of
              those manufacturers offer them because I checked when we bought a new
              machine a few years ago. I'm just guessing, but it may be that
              walking feet are simply not available for certain (less expensive?)
              machines.

              Brandon in Honolulu


              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
              > Thanks for the sewing tip Brandon--the walking foot sounds
              promissing.
              > I have no experience with one, but would love to hear from anyone
              else
              > who does. Any idea where to get one Brandon? ..Ed
              >
              >
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: uluheman [mailto:UluheMan@h...]
              > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 5:25 PM
              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Hammock Camping sewing with walking foot
              >
              >
              > I haven't seen anyone mention my favorite sewing aid: the walking
              > foot. It's a small, expensive gizmo that may or may not be
              available
              > as an accessory for your particular sewing machine. It replaces the
              > usual presser foot and serves as a set of upper feed dogs, exactly
              > synchronized to the lower feed dogs (which are the only ones most
              > people ever use). Because silnylon is so slick, the lower feed dogs
              > may feed the lower piece of fabric, but slippage may (will!) occur
              > between the lower and upper pieces of fabric you're trying to sew,
              > which causes plenty of problems. With a walking foot, you should
              get
              > nice and even stitches because the walking foot is feeding the
              upper
              > piece of fabric at the same rate as the lower piece, minimizing
              > slippage between the two pieces. No need to pull the fabric through
              > manually, either; just let the machine do the work at it's own
              pace,
              > as it was designed to do.
              >
              > Brandon in Honolulu
              >
              >
              terms/> .
            • Shane
              ... All of the Adler machines I worked on had them. These were long arm patch machines specifically designed for leatherwork. They worked well in nylon of
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 2 12:28 PM
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                > Thanks for the sewing tip Brandon--the walking foot sounds
                > promissing. I have no experience with one, but would love to
                > hear from anyone else who does. Any idea where to get one
                > Brandon? ..Ed

                All of the Adler machines I worked on had them. These were 'long arm patch'
                machines specifically designed for leatherwork. They worked well in nylon
                of any gauge. Tippman is also making a pneumatic machine that has a lot of
                promise.

                Shane
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