Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Hammock Camping] Alternative to Nylon?

Expand Messages
  • hiking@westernpa.us
    On a rope all the stress is contained within a small area, in the hammock material you are spreading your weight out over server sq meters. Now, if you tried
    Message 1 of 18 , May 23 5:48 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      On a rope all the stress is contained within a small area, in the hammock
      material you are spreading your weight out over server sq meters. Now, if
      you tried to stand up in the hammock and concentrated your weight in the
      area taken upp by your feet then, yes, the material would give.

      mike

      > Thank you for all advice!
      >
      > I'll have a go at a hammock in the near future. I've seen some polyester
      > fabric at very low prices in the city I most often visit, so I'll get
      > that next time I go.
      >
      > Just one more question: Is 60g/m2 really enough? This seems very thin to
      > me.
      > I would never trust my life to a rope unless its breaking strength is at
      > least twice the weight it needs to carry, preferably 3x. In my case,
      > that means the hammock should be able to carry at least 250kg, probably
      > its best if it can hold more than 300kg (with clothing, pad and sleeping
      > bag, I guess I'm about 110kg).
      >
      > I've fallen through a hammock in my youth, and also had a rope break
      > (both in old and rather worn canvas/grass rope hammocks). I was not
      > injured, and apart from a pine cone (with which I had a quite unpleasant
      > encounter), the ground was flat. On the other hand, this is not
      > something I would like to do on a regular basis....
      >
      > Which leads me back to the essential question: Is 60g/m2 adequate?
      > (That's about 1.77 oz/yd2)!
      >
      >
      > Best regards,
      > Tom Einar
      >
      >
      > Ps.: I got an error message when I tried to send this the first time. It
      > seems that yahoo-e-mails had been bouncing at my ISP, and consequently
      > Yahoo temporarily closed my account (this happens at least once a month,
      > I don't know why). I may have missed answers from you, and if so, I
      > apologize. The last posting I have on the topic is from Rick, 20.05.2005
      > 23.20.


      Happens to everyone, Yahoo mail sucks.
    • stereologen
      Now you have me worried; My behind _is_ bigger than my feet, but not all that much....:-)) Tom Einar ... hammock ... Now, if ... Ps. I still have trouble with
      Message 2 of 18 , May 24 4:16 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Now you have me worried; My behind _is_ bigger than my feet, but not
        all that much....:-))

        Tom Einar

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, hiking@w... wrote:
        > On a rope all the stress is contained within a small area, in the
        hammock
        > material you are spreading your weight out over server sq meters.
        Now, if
        > you tried to stand up in the hammock and concentrated your weight in the
        > area taken upp by your feet then, yes, the material would give.
        >
        > mike


        Ps. I still have trouble with this list. Now I'm getting other
        messages, but not this thread. (I have to log onto Yahoo and read
        online to read this thread). Have anyone had similar difficulties, and
        if so, is there a cure?
      • stereologen
        ... bedroom! This may be a new line of business: Demolition hammocks! :-) ... The only source I ve found for the webbing, is to buy luggage straps. The ones
        Message 3 of 18 , May 24 4:33 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
          > Tom, I've tested 1.9 oz/yd2 to 375 lbs w/ me bouncing up & down-the only
          > thing that happened was it pulled the bolts out of the wall of my
          bedroom!
          This may be a new line of business: Demolition hammocks! :-)

          > I recommend at least 700 lb breaking strength polypropylene or polyester
          > webbing straps and it's buyer beware since many straps for sale are much
          > weaker and you can't tell just by looking at them. Also note that it's
          > practically impossible to visibly distinguish between polypropylene,
          > polyester, and nylon webbing, but you'll want to avoid nylon due to it's
          > high-memory stretch.

          The only source I've found for the webbing, is to buy luggage straps.
          The ones I've looked at are declared both for fiber and strength, so I
          should be able to find a suitable one. There is a 1" strap with a
          breaking strenght of 500kg (about 1100lbs), and I thought I'd get the
          webbing from that one. There is also a 350kg strap (~770lbs), and
          based on what you say, that should do as well, I guess.

          There are straps made from all three polymers; nylon is not the thing,
          but should I choose PP or polyester, if there is a choice?

          > Making your own hammock is both fun and rewarding! FYI, we sell camping
          > hammock kits with everything needed to make your own-so we've done
          most of
          > the work for you. We also have the recommended webbing straps in cut
          > lengths.
          I did consider this. However, with the shipping, customs handling fees
          and taxes, the price is nearly doubled by the time it gets here. I may
          opt for a kit or finnished product later, but for now, I just want to
          find out if this type of hammock is as comfortable as everybody says.

          > All the best with your project..Ed

          Thank you!



          Finally; Thank you all for kind advice!

          Best regards,
          Tom Einar
        • Mike Lipay
          ... Try these: 1000lb: http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/product.asp?s%5Fid=0&dept% 5Fid=10196&pf%
          Message 4 of 18 , May 24 5:12 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            On May 24, 2005, at 7:33 PM, stereologen wrote:


            > The only source I've found for the webbing, is to buy luggage straps.
            > The ones I've looked at are declared both for fiber and strength, so I
            > should be able to find a suitable one. There is a 1" strap with a
            > breaking strenght of 500kg (about 1100lbs), and I thought I'd get the
            > webbing from that one. There is also a 350kg strap (~770lbs), and
            > based on what you say, that should do as well, I guess.


            Try these:

            1000lb: http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/product.asp?s%5Fid=0&dept%
            5Fid=10196&pf%
            5Fid=PAAAIAFJBPHFOIPE&mscssid=81091266870498778117132186889651

            1500lb: http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/product.asp?s%5Fid=0&dept%
            5Fid=10196&pf%
            5Fid=PAAAAALEAEHKOIPE&mscssid=81091266870498778117132186889651

            at 15' each you should have more than enough.

            mike
          • jwj32542
            ... have trouble with this list. Now I m getting other ... and ... Try getting the digest version?
            Message 5 of 18 , May 24 6:20 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "stereologen" > Ps. I still
              have trouble with this list. Now I'm getting other
              > messages, but not this thread. (I have to log onto Yahoo and read
              > online to read this thread). Have anyone had similar difficulties,
              and
              > if so, is there a cure?

              Try getting the digest version?
            • jwj32542
              ... This is what I use: http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/PRODUCTLINK2.htm Webbing, Polypropylene Protects trees, recommend 2 @ 12 ea for hammock; 1
              Message 6 of 18 , May 24 6:32 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "stereologen" <postlister@m...>
                wrote:
                > The only source I've found for the webbing, is to buy luggage straps.

                This is what I use:
                http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/PRODUCTLINK2.htm
                Webbing, Polypropylene Protects trees, recommend 2 @ 12' ea for
                hammock;
                1" Wide, 700 lb breaking strength (supports up to 250 lbs in hammock),
                black, low-memory stretch; 24' weighs 5 oz; $0.50/yd

                Annapolis Performance Sailing all kinds of line and cordage, but I
                haven't used them. They have some cheap 1" Polyester webbing, but for
                some reason they won't let me copy the description because it's
                copyrighted...guess they don't want free advertising.
                http://www.apsltd.com/Tree/d3000/e885.asp
              • Ed Speer
                Tom, polyester is the best, if you can find it. It is strong and has the least stretch of the 3, but deteriorates the fastest in sunlight. PP is the next
                Message 7 of 18 , May 24 7:17 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Tom, polyester is the best, if you can find it. It is strong and has the
                  least stretch of the 3, but deteriorates the fastest in sunlight. PP is the
                  next best choice. The strengths you mentioned are quite suitable...Ed



                  Moderator, Hammock Camping List
                  Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

                  Editor, Hammock Camping News

                  Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



                  _____

                  From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of stereologen
                  Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2005 6:33 PM
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Alternative to Nylon?



                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
                  > Tom, I've tested 1.9 oz/yd2 to 375 lbs w/ me bouncing up & down-the only
                  > thing that happened was it pulled the bolts out of the wall of my
                  bedroom!
                  This may be a new line of business: Demolition hammocks! :-)

                  > I recommend at least 700 lb breaking strength polypropylene or polyester
                  > webbing straps and it's buyer beware since many straps for sale are much
                  > weaker and you can't tell just by looking at them. Also note that it's
                  > practically impossible to visibly distinguish between polypropylene,
                  > polyester, and nylon webbing, but you'll want to avoid nylon due to it's
                  > high-memory stretch.

                  The only source I've found for the webbing, is to buy luggage straps.
                  The ones I've looked at are declared both for fiber and strength, so I
                  should be able to find a suitable one. There is a 1" strap with a
                  breaking strenght of 500kg (about 1100lbs), and I thought I'd get the
                  webbing from that one. There is also a 350kg strap (~770lbs), and
                  based on what you say, that should do as well, I guess.

                  There are straps made from all three polymers; nylon is not the thing,
                  but should I choose PP or polyester, if there is a choice?

                  > Making your own hammock is both fun and rewarding! FYI, we sell camping
                  > hammock kits with everything needed to make your own-so we've done
                  most of
                  > the work for you. We also have the recommended webbing straps in cut
                  > lengths.
                  I did consider this. However, with the shipping, customs handling fees
                  and taxes, the price is nearly doubled by the time it gets here. I may
                  opt for a kit or finnished product later, but for now, I just want to
                  find out if this type of hammock is as comfortable as everybody says.

                  > All the best with your project..Ed

                  Thank you!



                  Finally; Thank you all for kind advice!

                  Best regards,
                  Tom Einar








                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.