Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Benefit of Snakeskins?

Expand Messages
  • Bob
    I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering a pair of snakeskins. I ve read how to use them and I understand it as well as I m going until I get a chance
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 29 4:56 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering a pair of
      snakeskins. I've read how to use them and I understand it as well as
      I'm going until I get a chance to play with them. What still has me
      scratching my head is the benefit of these things. Taking down of my
      hammock takes about one minute right now. I clip the fly to the
      hammock tie outs plastic rings and leave it attached the sliding knot
      tensioner. I then untie the head end of the hammock and without
      letting the hammock touch the ground start stuffing the hammock into
      it's stuff sack. I keep stuffing until I get to the foot end that is
      tied to the other tree. I then untie that end and finish the
      stuffing. Of course if the fly is very wet I detach it from the
      hammock and allow it to dry by itself in the mesh back pocket of my
      backpack and just stuff the hammock. When setting up I know the foot
      end of the hammock will come out first and choose my set up site with
      this in mind. When coming out of the stuff sack the elastic tensioers
      and fly guys are usually not tangled enough to cause me any
      difficulty with set up. I've heard some people talk about having to
      fold their hammock and fly, but I've never seen a reason to do this.
      My stuffing method doesn't become a tangled mess as long as my fly is
      attached to the hammock at the four places I 've mentioned. The
      snakeskin takedown scenario seems much longer and harder than my
      method.
      On Shane's web site he takes about the rain benefit of
      snakeskins.
      "An important side benefit of the Snakeskins is not even mentioned
      in the instructions or on the Hennessy website. One of the banes of
      hammock use is heavy rain because the suspension ropes become
      saturated and water wicks along the ropes and wets the hammock bed.
      The common solution is to tie cotton or other absorbent strings to
      the suspension ropes near their attachment to the hammock bed. The
      strings wick water away from the rope and it drips to the ground
      instead of wetting the hammock bed. With the Snakeskins, the drip
      strings are no longer necessary."
      I haven't been in rain that was so hard that it's given me any
      problems. We did have a drought last summer here in Northern PA. I
      also like having the hammock stuff sack to store my few odds and end
      like maps, first aid kit, LED light, journal etc like Sgt Rock does.
      So ok all you people sold on these things tell me what I am missing
      out on.
    • geoflyfisher
      In my opinion, two primary benefits: 1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection available. 2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without getting
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 30 2:46 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        In my opinion, two primary benefits:

        1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection available.

        2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without getting it wet.
        There are a couple methods to do this, depending on which make
        hammock you have, and whether you put the fly up over the hammock, or
        attached to it.

        2+ (extra credit) You can lay the hammock on the ground to figure
        out spacing without getting it wet. (I think Shane also said this
        first as well.)

        Since you can build your own for just a couple dollars, this is
        benefit enough, in my book.



        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <rnunnink@s...> wrote:
        > I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering a pair of
        > snakeskins. I've read how to use them and I understand it as well
        as
        > I'm going until I get a chance to play with them. What still has
        me
        > scratching my head is the benefit of these things. Taking down of
        my
        > hammock takes about one minute right now. I clip the fly to the
        > hammock tie outs plastic rings and leave it attached the sliding
        knot
        > tensioner. I then untie the head end of the hammock and without
        > letting the hammock touch the ground start stuffing the hammock
        into
        > it's stuff sack. I keep stuffing until I get to the foot end that
        is
        > tied to the other tree. I then untie that end and finish the
        > stuffing. Of course if the fly is very wet I detach it from the
        > hammock and allow it to dry by itself in the mesh back pocket of my
        > backpack and just stuff the hammock. When setting up I know the
        foot
        > end of the hammock will come out first and choose my set up site
        with
        > this in mind. When coming out of the stuff sack the elastic
        tensioers
        > and fly guys are usually not tangled enough to cause me any
        > difficulty with set up. I've heard some people talk about having to
        > fold their hammock and fly, but I've never seen a reason to do
        this.
        > My stuffing method doesn't become a tangled mess as long as my fly
        is
        > attached to the hammock at the four places I 've mentioned. The
        > snakeskin takedown scenario seems much longer and harder than my
        > method.
        > On Shane's web site he takes about the rain benefit of
        > snakeskins.
        > "An important side benefit of the Snakeskins is not even mentioned
        > in the instructions or on the Hennessy website. One of the banes
        of
        > hammock use is heavy rain because the suspension ropes become
        > saturated and water wicks along the ropes and wets the hammock
        bed.
        > The common solution is to tie cotton or other absorbent strings to
        > the suspension ropes near their attachment to the hammock bed. The
        > strings wick water away from the rope and it drips to the ground
        > instead of wetting the hammock bed. With the Snakeskins, the drip
        > strings are no longer necessary."
        > I haven't been in rain that was so hard that it's given me any
        > problems. We did have a drought last summer here in Northern PA. I
        > also like having the hammock stuff sack to store my few odds and
        end
        > like maps, first aid kit, LED light, journal etc like Sgt Rock does.
        > So ok all you people sold on these things tell me what I am
        missing
        > out on.
      • colonelcorn76
        I have both an Ultralight Asym and an Expedition. The Ultralight has snakeskins and the Expedition does not. The only real downside of the skins is that you
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 30 4:17 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          I have both an Ultralight Asym and an Expedition. The Ultralight has
          snakeskins and the Expedition does not. The only real downside of
          the skins is that you end up with a 6 foot(ish) snake. That's not
          the most convenient thing to pack and takes more room than the stuff
          sack. So, I'm ok with it for the Ultralight (I coil it up inside my
          pack), but my son prefers the stuff sack with the Expedition as he
          prefers the pack size of the sack.

          I've also replaced the fly tie-outs with rubber tubing from a
          slingshot and the string tie-out lines with flourescent yellow nylon
          mason's twine. It's strong enough to hold the fly and lets me (& my
          camp mates) see where the tie-outs are (otherwise it's easy to trip
          over them). The rubber tubing makes it self-tensioning.

          I also whip stiched all around the small ring at the end of the foot
          end of the snakeskin with yellow poly thread. That way I can tell
          which end is the foot end without having to set it up first.

          Jim


          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "geoflyfisher"
          <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
          > In my opinion, two primary benefits:
          >
          > 1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection available.
          >
          > 2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without getting it
          wet.
          > There are a couple methods to do this, depending on which make
          > hammock you have, and whether you put the fly up over the hammock,
          or
          > attached to it.
          >
          > 2+ (extra credit) You can lay the hammock on the ground to figure
          > out spacing without getting it wet. (I think Shane also said
          this
          > first as well.)
          >
          > Since you can build your own for just a couple dollars, this is
          > benefit enough, in my book.
        • Stephen T. Gregorie
          ... sounds like there are a couple ways to attach the fly?...clipped to the tie ropes from the hammock..and?? does anyone run seperate tie ropes for the fly? I
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 30 6:20 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            >and whether you put the fly up over the hammock, or
            > attached to it.


            sounds like there are a couple ways to attach the
            fly?...clipped to the tie ropes from the
            hammock..and?? does anyone run seperate tie ropes for
            the fly? I would like a larger light weigh fly, where
            should I look?

            --- geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@...> wrote:
            > In my opinion, two primary benefits:
            >
            > 1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection
            > available.
            >
            > 2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without
            > getting it wet.
            > There are a couple methods to do this, depending on
            > which make
            > hammock you have, and whether you put the fly up
            > over the hammock, or
            > attached to it.
            >
            > 2+ (extra credit) You can lay the hammock on the
            > ground to figure
            > out spacing without getting it wet. (I think Shane
            > also said this
            > first as well.)
            >
            > Since you can build your own for just a couple
            > dollars, this is
            > benefit enough, in my book.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bob"
            > <rnunnink@s...> wrote:
            > > I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering
            > a pair of
            > > snakeskins. I've read how to use them and I
            > understand it as well
            > as
            > > I'm going until I get a chance to play with them.
            > What still has
            > me
            > > scratching my head is the benefit of these things.
            > Taking down of
            > my
            > > hammock takes about one minute right now. I clip
            > the fly to the
            > > hammock tie outs plastic rings and leave it
            > attached the sliding
            > knot
            > > tensioner. I then untie the head end of the
            > hammock and without
            > > letting the hammock touch the ground start
            > stuffing the hammock
            > into
            > > it's stuff sack. I keep stuffing until I get to
            > the foot end that
            > is
            > > tied to the other tree. I then untie that end and
            > finish the
            > > stuffing. Of course if the fly is very wet I
            > detach it from the
            > > hammock and allow it to dry by itself in the mesh
            > back pocket of my
            > > backpack and just stuff the hammock. When setting
            > up I know the
            > foot
            > > end of the hammock will come out first and choose
            > my set up site
            > with
            > > this in mind. When coming out of the stuff sack
            > the elastic
            > tensioers
            > > and fly guys are usually not tangled enough to
            > cause me any
            > > difficulty with set up. I've heard some people
            > talk about having to
            > > fold their hammock and fly, but I've never seen a
            > reason to do
            > this.
            > > My stuffing method doesn't become a tangled mess
            > as long as my fly
            > is
            > > attached to the hammock at the four places I 've
            > mentioned. The
            > > snakeskin takedown scenario seems much longer and
            > harder than my
            > > method.
            > > On Shane's web site he takes about the rain
            > benefit of
            > > snakeskins.
            > > "An important side benefit of the Snakeskins is
            > not even mentioned
            > > in the instructions or on the Hennessy website.
            > One of the banes
            > of
            > > hammock use is heavy rain because the suspension
            > ropes become
            > > saturated and water wicks along the ropes and wets
            > the hammock
            > bed.
            > > The common solution is to tie cotton or other
            > absorbent strings to
            > > the suspension ropes near their attachment to the
            > hammock bed. The
            > > strings wick water away from the rope and it drips
            > to the ground
            > > instead of wetting the hammock bed. With the
            > Snakeskins, the drip
            > > strings are no longer necessary."
            > > I haven't been in rain that was so hard that
            > it's given me any
            > > problems. We did have a drought last summer here
            > in Northern PA. I
            > > also like having the hammock stuff sack to store
            > my few odds and
            > end
            > > like maps, first aid kit, LED light, journal etc
            > like Sgt Rock does.
            > > So ok all you people sold on these things tell
            > me what I am
            > missing
            > > out on.
            >
            >


            __________________________________________________
            Do you Yahoo!?
            Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
            http://platinum.yahoo.com
          • starnescr
            There is only one way to attach the original fly to the HH. the prussic knot has a clip at the end which attaches around to plastic circle piece. The fly
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 30 7:00 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              There is only one way to attach the original fly to the HH. the
              prussic knot has a clip at the end which attaches around to plastic
              circle piece. The fly provided with the HH needs to be down where it
              is to avoid possible blowing rain from getting in. But, if you want
              a larger fly you could run an extra ridge line over the HH and use
              it for the fly hung in a more traditional retecangular shape. Some
              folks like this option as it provides more coverage for cooking etc
              in bad weather. The fly on my Crazy Crib LEX is nice for this but
              the hammock is in the way and with the poles in place. It would be
              a great setup for a simpler hammock in the winter when the enclosure
              wouldnt be needed for bug protection. But the 6 stake it needs is a
              downside. Plusses and minuses for every possible situation and gear
              choice.

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen T. Gregorie"
              <stgga@y...> wrote:
              > >and whether you put the fly up over the hammock, or
              > > attached to it.
              >
              >
              > sounds like there are a couple ways to attach the
              > fly?...clipped to the tie ropes from the
              > hammock..and?? does anyone run seperate tie ropes for
              > the fly? I would like a larger light weigh fly, where
              > should I look?
              >
              > --- geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
              > > In my opinion, two primary benefits:
              > >
              > > 1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection
              > > available.
              > >
              > > 2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without
              > > getting it wet.
              > > There are a couple methods to do this, depending on
              > > which make
              > > hammock you have, and whether you put the fly up
              > > over the hammock, or
              > > attached to it.
              > >
              > > 2+ (extra credit) You can lay the hammock on the
              > > ground to figure
              > > out spacing without getting it wet. (I think Shane
              > > also said this
              > > first as well.)
              > >
              > > Since you can build your own for just a couple
              > > dollars, this is
              > > benefit enough, in my book.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bob"
              > > <rnunnink@s...> wrote:
              > > > I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering
              > > a pair of
              > > > snakeskins. I've read how to use them and I
              > > understand it as well
              > > as
              > > > I'm going until I get a chance to play with them.
              > > What still has
              > > me
              > > > scratching my head is the benefit of these things.
              > > Taking down of
              > > my
              > > > hammock takes about one minute right now. I clip
              > > the fly to the
              > > > hammock tie outs plastic rings and leave it
              > > attached the sliding
              > > knot
              > > > tensioner. I then untie the head end of the
              > > hammock and without
              > > > letting the hammock touch the ground start
              > > stuffing the hammock
              > > into
              > > > it's stuff sack. I keep stuffing until I get to
              > > the foot end that
              > > is
              > > > tied to the other tree. I then untie that end and
              > > finish the
              > > > stuffing. Of course if the fly is very wet I
              > > detach it from the
              > > > hammock and allow it to dry by itself in the mesh
              > > back pocket of my
              > > > backpack and just stuff the hammock. When setting
              > > up I know the
              > > foot
              > > > end of the hammock will come out first and choose
              > > my set up site
              > > with
              > > > this in mind. When coming out of the stuff sack
              > > the elastic
              > > tensioers
              > > > and fly guys are usually not tangled enough to
              > > cause me any
              > > > difficulty with set up. I've heard some people
              > > talk about having to
              > > > fold their hammock and fly, but I've never seen a
              > > reason to do
              > > this.
              > > > My stuffing method doesn't become a tangled mess
              > > as long as my fly
              > > is
              > > > attached to the hammock at the four places I 've
              > > mentioned. The
              > > > snakeskin takedown scenario seems much longer and
              > > harder than my
              > > > method.
              > > > On Shane's web site he takes about the rain
              > > benefit of
              > > > snakeskins.
              > > > "An important side benefit of the Snakeskins is
              > > not even mentioned
              > > > in the instructions or on the Hennessy website.
              > > One of the banes
              > > of
              > > > hammock use is heavy rain because the suspension
              > > ropes become
              > > > saturated and water wicks along the ropes and wets
              > > the hammock
              > > bed.
              > > > The common solution is to tie cotton or other
              > > absorbent strings to
              > > > the suspension ropes near their attachment to the
              > > hammock bed. The
              > > > strings wick water away from the rope and it drips
              > > to the ground
              > > > instead of wetting the hammock bed. With the
              > > Snakeskins, the drip
              > > > strings are no longer necessary."
              > > > I haven't been in rain that was so hard that
              > > it's given me any
              > > > problems. We did have a drought last summer here
              > > in Northern PA. I
              > > > also like having the hammock stuff sack to store
              > > my few odds and
              > > end
              > > > like maps, first aid kit, LED light, journal etc
              > > like Sgt Rock does.
              > > > So ok all you people sold on these things tell
              > > me what I am
              > > missing
              > > > out on.
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your
              desktop!
              > http://platinum.yahoo.com
            • geoflyfisher
              Hi Steven, Nothing new here. Between TopRock and Shane, it has been covered in their web sites. But to briefly restate: With the HH, one can attach the
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 31 5:09 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Steven,

                Nothing new here. Between TopRock and Shane, it has been covered in
                their web sites. But to briefly restate:

                With the HH, one can attach the snakeskins outside or inside the fly
                attchment point. If attached outside the fly, then the fly is
                normally enclosed in the snakeskins. If the Snakeskinz are attached
                between the fly attachment and the hammock, then the snakeskins just
                enclose the hammock and the fly is packed outside it. Advantage of
                this second method is that the fly can be dried separately at lunch.
                If you need to put the hammock up in the rain, you can tie the
                hammock up with the waterproof snakeskins protecting it, then clip on
                the fly, stretch it out with its stakes, and then open the
                snakeskins. This keeps the hammock dry. without having to carefully
                open the snakeskins trying to make sure the fly is on top. If it is
                windy, this ability to put the hammock up without a care is really
                quite nice.

                If you want a lightweight fly which is larger, Campmoor makes one, I
                believe Ed Speer would sell one separately, or you can sew one
                yourself. It is a project which takes about $50 of materials (6 2/3
                yards of silnylon, tie-outs, cords, etc) Ray Jardine's book has OK
                instructions on how to sew it, as do several sources on the net -
                some even better than Ray's. Having built two Jardine type tarps, I
                would opt for deleting the "peaks" for this hammock use.

                With the larger fly, it is normally pitched separately from the
                hammock and then the hammock is tied up under the tarp.

                <><

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen T. Gregorie"
                <stgga@y...> wrote:
                > >and whether you put the fly up over the hammock, or
                > > attached to it.
                >
                >
                > sounds like there are a couple ways to attach the
                > fly?...clipped to the tie ropes from the
                > hammock..and?? does anyone run seperate tie ropes for
                > the fly? I would like a larger light weigh fly, where
                > should I look?
                >
                > --- geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
                > > In my opinion, two primary benefits:
                > >
                > > 1. As you say Shane has said: best drip protection
                > > available.
                > >
                > > 2. You can put the hammock up in the rain without
                > > getting it wet.
                > > There are a couple methods to do this, depending on
                > > which make
                > > hammock you have, and whether you put the fly up
                > > over the hammock, or
                > > attached to it.
                > >
                > > 2+ (extra credit) You can lay the hammock on the
                > > ground to figure
                > > out spacing without getting it wet. (I think Shane
                > > also said this
                > > first as well.)
                > >
                > > Since you can build your own for just a couple
                > > dollars, this is
                > > benefit enough, in my book.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bob"
                > > <rnunnink@s...> wrote:
                > > > I own A HH safari and was thinking of ordering
                > > a pair of
                > > > snakeskins. I've read how to use them and I
                > > understand it as well
                > > as
                > > > I'm going until I get a chance to play with them.
                > > What still has
                > > me
                > > > scratching my head is the benefit of these things.
                > > Taking down of
                > > my
                > > > hammock takes about one minute right now. I clip
                > > the fly to the
                > > > hammock tie outs plastic rings and leave it
                > > attached the sliding
                > > knot
                > > > tensioner. I then untie the head end of the
                > > hammock and without
                > > > letting the hammock touch the ground start
                > > stuffing the hammock
                > > into
                > > > it's stuff sack. I keep stuffing until I get to
                > > the foot end that
                > > is
                > > > tied to the other tree. I then untie that end and
                > > finish the
                > > > stuffing. Of course if the fly is very wet I
                > > detach it from the
                > > > hammock and allow it to dry by itself in the mesh
                > > back pocket of my
                > > > backpack and just stuff the hammock. When setting
                > > up I know the
                > > foot
                > > > end of the hammock will come out first and choose
                > > my set up site
                > > with
                > > > this in mind. When coming out of the stuff sack
                > > the elastic
                > > tensioers
                > > > and fly guys are usually not tangled enough to
                > > cause me any
                > > > difficulty with set up. I've heard some people
                > > talk about having to
                > > > fold their hammock and fly, but I've never seen a
                > > reason to do
                > > this.
                > > > My stuffing method doesn't become a tangled mess
                > > as long as my fly
                > > is
                > > > attached to the hammock at the four places I 've
                > > mentioned. The
                > > > snakeskin takedown scenario seems much longer and
                > > harder than my
                > > > method.
                > > > On Shane's web site he takes about the rain
                > > benefit of
                > > > snakeskins.
                > > > "An important side benefit of the Snakeskins is
                > > not even mentioned
                > > > in the instructions or on the Hennessy website.
                > > One of the banes
                > > of
                > > > hammock use is heavy rain because the suspension
                > > ropes become
                > > > saturated and water wicks along the ropes and wets
                > > the hammock
                > > bed.
                > > > The common solution is to tie cotton or other
                > > absorbent strings to
                > > > the suspension ropes near their attachment to the
                > > hammock bed. The
                > > > strings wick water away from the rope and it drips
                > > to the ground
                > > > instead of wetting the hammock bed. With the
                > > Snakeskins, the drip
                > > > strings are no longer necessary."
                > > > I haven't been in rain that was so hard that
                > > it's given me any
                > > > problems. We did have a drought last summer here
                > > in Northern PA. I
                > > > also like having the hammock stuff sack to store
                > > my few odds and
                > > end
                > > > like maps, first aid kit, LED light, journal etc
                > > like Sgt Rock does.
                > > > So ok all you people sold on these things tell
                > > me what I am
                > > missing
                > > > out on.
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do you Yahoo!?
                > Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your
                desktop!
                > http://platinum.yahoo.com
              • David Chinell
                Stephen: If you want to have a larger tarp made, I can vouch for the quality of Moonbow Gear. http://www.moonbowgear.com/ They ve made me two tarps and the
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 31 7:05 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Stephen:

                  If you want to have a larger tarp made, I can vouch for the
                  quality of Moonbow Gear.

                  http://www.moonbowgear.com/

                  They've made me two tarps and the workmanship is excellent.
                  Prices depend on what you want, but seemed reasonable to me.

                  Bear
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.