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Re: hammocks and sleeping pads (more advice needed)

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  • Dave Womble
    Martin, That s a lot of questions. Basically you need some kind of insulation under you for sleeping in temperatures below about 70 degrees and most sleeping
    Message 1 of 10 , May 4, 2005
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      Martin,

      That's a lot of questions. Basically you need some kind of insulation
      under you for sleeping in temperatures below about 70 degrees and most
      sleeping bags compress enough underneath you so that they don't provide
      very much insulation under you. Hammocks tend to wrap around you sides
      so pads do need to a little wider in hammocks. Speer Hammock's new SPE
      add has some photos that show this on this link:
      http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm .

      There are other ways to get insulation on the bottom side of the
      hammock using various things, a few are commerial available and a few
      others are do it yourself projects. There are too many for a brief
      description so I won't try on this post. The good news is there are
      reliable ways to do it.

      Youngblood

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...>
      wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature with
      > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
      > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
      > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any thicker
      > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be wider
      > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape work
      > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any kinds
      > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Martin
    • zippydooda
      I use a 3/4 inch convoluted closed cell foam pad in a double bottomed hammock. It is great for that. I don t get cold from the bottom at all. Every now and
      Message 2 of 10 , May 5, 2005
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        I use a 3/4 inch convoluted closed cell foam pad in a double bottomed
        hammock. It is great for that. I don't get cold from the bottom at
        all. Every now and then my knees get in a spot where their insulation
        is compressed and they get cool, but it's no biggie to reposition
        slightly. My pad curves to fit the hammock just fine. A little more
        width might be nice sometimes, but then the pad would be more of a pain
        to carry.

        Bill in Houston

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...>
        wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature with
        > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
        > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
        > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any thicker
        > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be wider
        > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape work
        > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any kinds
        > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Martin
      • Rat
        Hey Martin, *SOME* kind of insulation is a MUST! But from there the choices are many. Open cell foam, like what comes with the HH Super Shelter is good because
        Message 3 of 10 , May 10, 2005
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          Hey Martin,

          *SOME* kind of insulation is a MUST! But from there the choices are
          many.

          Open cell foam, like what comes with the HH Super Shelter is good
          because it compresses for packing easily, conforms to your body
          better and is light weight. But, it needs to be suspended like an
          underquilt (so as not to compress and loose it R-value) and it soaks
          up water like a sponge. Plus it is pretty nuch a single use item.

          Closed Cell foam, This is what I use, mainly because it has multiple
          uses. I use it to sit on during breaks, as a pack frame (gearskins
          and other packs) and with the mylar glued to one side I *could* use
          it in an emergy to reflect heat from a fire toward my body if all my
          stuff was wet. Howver, it's bulky (but pretty light), and is more
          ridgid than other insulating choices (and it gets more ridgid the
          lower the temp).

          Over/Under quilts, MANY peole prefer this type of insulatin, light
          weight, easily packable and multiple use, even on the ground if need
          be. Although harder to get the hang of set up, once you do it is
          simple to repeat. Most quilts, even the Pea Pod, can be used around
          camp and on the trail as extra layers of warmth. I think I would
          prefer the synthetic over the down just because of the water factor
          (down+water= no insulation synthetic+water= wet but warm), for me
          it's a survivability thing.

          Clothing, while it is smart to use clothing to suppliment your
          chosen insulating system, some people use ONLY clothing. Stuff they
          carry any way. I read about one guy that does this (I can't remember
          where tho), but basically he carries extra clothes because he lives
          in an area where fast moving storms are frequent. So he carries the
          extra clothing anyway and uses it to sleep in. I think this is the
          guy that started the snow trench movement as well, but I'm not sure.

          Natural stuff, if you use a *Taco* or some other *shell* for your
          hammock you can use readily available natural materials, leaves,
          pine needles, whatever. This way is best used as a supplement to
          your regular insulating system. That's what I hear anyway, I have
          never used it.

          Windbreak or shells, using natural windbreaks, thickets, low points,
          leeward side of a hill is also smart. As are synthetic *shells* like
          the Taco or Risk's and Youngblood's systems. While they are not
          *exactly* insulation they can stop some of the convective heat loss
          due to wind. They can also serve as duel use by holding gear while
          you are hanging and as an extra layer of protection during sideways
          rain. They can increase your insulating system by 10 deg or more.

          Staying warm in a hammock is easier than ever, and a lot of the
          condensation problems have been worked out as well.

          Choosing a syatem that is right for you is a journey of self
          discovery, in a way anyway:). Just like my tarp is a frankenstein of
          MacCat tarps and Youngblood Tarps, my insulating system is taylored
          to my likes and hiking/survival preferences. For those of us
          hellbent to use our hammocks year 'round we have many choices. But,
          I'm afraid, you can't just go to REI and buy it.

          Rat

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...>
          wrote:
          > Hi,
          >
          > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature
          with
          > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
          > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
          > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any
          thicker
          > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be
          wider
          > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape
          work
          > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any
          kinds
          > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Martin
        • jwj32542
          Lots of good links out there on staying warm...just do a search. I m kinda partial to this one :) http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HammockCamping.html Three
          Message 4 of 10 , May 10, 2005
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            Lots of good links out there on staying warm...just do a search.

            I'm kinda partial to this one :)
            http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HammockCamping.html

            Three things to keep in mind:
            1 - Site selection (Leeward side of hills, vegetation, etc)
            2 - Windblock (CCF, taco, Weathershield, etc)
            3 - Loft (Pad, PeaPod, Underquilt, etc.

            Then create your own method! (Just send me a link so I can include it
            on my page!)

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...>
            wrote:
            > Hi,
            >
            > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature with
            > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
            > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
            > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any thicker
            > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be wider
            > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape work
            > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any kinds
            > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Martin
          • Ed Speer
            I really like your hammock web page Jeff-will add your link to my next newsletter...Ed Moderator, Hammock Camping List Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete
            Message 5 of 10 , May 10, 2005
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              I really like your hammock web page Jeff-will add your link to my next
              newsletter...Ed



              Moderator, Hammock Camping List
              Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

              Editor, Hammock Camping News

              Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



              _____

              From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of jwj32542
              Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2005 7:33 AM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammocks and sleeping pads (more advice
              needed)



              Lots of good links out there on staying warm...just do a search.

              I'm kinda partial to this one :)
              http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HammockCamping.html

              Three things to keep in mind:
              1 - Site selection (Leeward side of hills, vegetation, etc)
              2 - Windblock (CCF, taco, Weathershield, etc)
              3 - Loft (Pad, PeaPod, Underquilt, etc.

              Then create your own method! (Just send me a link so I can include it
              on my page!)

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...>
              wrote:
              > Hi,
              >
              > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature with
              > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
              > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
              > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any thicker
              > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be wider
              > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape work
              > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any kinds
              > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Martin





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            • bedeutung
              My thanks to all who responded - especially Rat for the detail (precisely what I needed). Being a complete newbie considering hammocking I had no idea there
              Message 6 of 10 , May 10, 2005
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                My thanks to all who responded - especially Rat for the detail
                (precisely what I needed). Being a complete newbie considering
                hammocking I had no idea there were things called "Pea Pods" or
                "underquilts".

                Cheers

                MG

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bedeutung" <bedeutung@y...> wrote:
                > Hi,
                >
                > I get the impression that sleeping pads are an important feature with
                > hammock camping, even more so than for ground camping, presumably
                > because the "floor" somewhat curves up around the sleeper. So what
                > kind of sleeping pad would be useful? Does it need to be any thicker
                > than I might use for ground camping? Or does it just need to be wider
                > to curl up around the sides? Does the standard rectangular shape work
                > okay, or does a different shape work better? And are there any kinds
                > to avoid - for instance do thermarests work okay?
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Martin
              • David Chinell
                Martin: Pads are for insulation, not padding per se. My favorite method is to start with a 3/8-inch (1 cm) pad, sized 20 x 72 inches (0.5 x 1.8 m). I cut this
                Message 7 of 10 , May 11, 2005
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                  Martin:

                  Pads are for insulation, not padding per se.

                  My favorite method is to start with a 3/8-inch (1 cm) pad,
                  sized 20 x 72 inches (0.5 x 1.8 m). I cut this in half to
                  yield two pieces, each 20 x 36 inches (0.5 x 0.9 m). I round
                  the corners off of each piece, using the largest plate or
                  pot lid handy.

                  These can be arranged side-by-side, or in a T-shape, and
                  seem to provide good coverage either way.

                  I now have several sets of these pads, in various
                  thicknesses, to allow for different temperatures.

                  Bear
                • David Chinell
                  Bill: You said A little more width might be nice sometimes, but then the pad would be more of a pain to carry. That s the conclusion I came to as well, but
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 11, 2005
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                    Bill:

                    You said "A little more width might be nice sometimes, but
                    then the pad would be more of a pain to carry."

                    That's the conclusion I came to as well, but rather than
                    trying to find wider and wider pads, I just started cutting
                    one long one in half and putting them side-by-side.

                    Bear
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