Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

D-ring experiment

Expand Messages
  • David Chinell
    Backpacking Log Temp: 60 - 85 deg F Wind: Light, with occasional gusts Gear: Tropical hammock, thinsulate poncho liner, poncho as GI shell, 15-foot D-ring
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 17, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Backpacking Log

      Temp: 60 - 85 deg F
      Wind: Light, with occasional gusts
      Gear: Tropical hammock, thinsulate poncho liner, poncho as
      GI shell, 15-foot D-ring polypro straps, 9 x 9 tulle
      mosquito net

      The main test for this trip was a pair of 15-foot poly-pro
      straps. I had sewn a pair of D-rings into the end of each
      strap. My idea was to wrap the straps around the trees,
      Speer style, but leave about six inches of strap and the
      D-rings exposed, then tie my hammock lines through the
      D-rings.

      I put two D-rings in each strap, thinking that the straps
      could then also be used as straps -- maybe to strap my pad
      to the bottom of my pack, or to make a bedroll.

      It was cloudy with a promise of rain on the hike in, so when
      I reached camp I started by putting up my tarp. This time, I
      pitched the tarp to itself, that is, with a floating
      ridgeline. This rig makes it simple to center the tarp.

      I tie a cord to one end of the tarp, loop it around the
      tree, pass it back through the tarp, then rest the cord on
      the ground, stretching it out towards the second tree. I tie
      a cord to the other end, of the tarp, wrap it around the
      tree, pass it back through the tarp, and tie it to the first
      cord with a tautline hitch. (Or through a loop in the end of
      the first cord and back onto itself.) Then, with a little
      tension on, I can raise and adjust the tarp to it's desired
      position.

      With the tarp up, I proceeded to my experiments with the
      polypro webbing and D-rings.

      I wrapped the first strap as Speer recommends, holding the
      D-ring end out from the tree about six inches. To this, I
      tied one end of my hammock, using both D-rings as a tie-off
      loop.

      For my first experiment, I tried using the other polypro
      strap as a simple belt around the second tree -- like the
      Crazy Creek system. I tied my hammock line through this
      belt, then used the D-rings to take up the slack.

      I eased into the hammock. It actually held! I bounced and
      swung a bit, then inspected the webbing carefully. It seemed
      to work perfectly. I was astonished that the webbing showed
      no tendency to slip through the D-rings. I had thought that
      a squared buckle, like the Crazy Creek system, would be
      needed.

      For my second experiment, I wove the hammock mains through
      the D-rings, both lines, side-by-side, and flat. I didn't
      really expect it to work, but miracle of miracles, this held
      too. I quickly rigged both hammock mains this way. This made
      it really easy to center and tension the hammock correctly.

      I spend the night with the hammock mains rigged this way.
      Close inspection revealed no more compression of the lines
      than would arise from knotting, and no slippage despite a
      restless night.

      After finishing my strap experiments, I put my actual
      ridgeline cord (plus an extra tie-out cord) in a huge loop
      around both trees, about a foot below the polypro straps. I
      used this to drape my tulle in an actual mosquito bar shape,
      rather than an A-frame draped from the ridgeline.

      This rigging let me sling the net much lower, without
      interfering with the hammock mains. I could swing freely
      between the two mosquito net lines.

      I expected a low of 65 deg F, not 60, so I went with no pad,
      and was cold on the bottom. Tucking the poncho liner under
      me seemed to help some. This made me wonder whether a
      sleeping bag might not be useful in some temps, despite the
      material under me getting compressed.

      Around two in the morning, I was uncomfortable enough that I
      got up to clip my poncho underneath my hammock, trying for
      the Garlington Insulator effect. It was awkward to work in
      the darkness. I must remember to perform my critical
      experiments and trial runs in the daylight.

      The poncho didn't seem to help much. Maybe I had it too
      close to the hammock bottom, and wasn't allowing a trapped
      air space.

      The polypro straps seem bulkier and heavier than the tree
      ropes I've been using, but they sure worked well for me.
      Learning that the D-rings worked so well was great. Now I
      don't have to rely on Crazy Creek straps or keep searching
      the internet for those square buckles. But I'm still not
      satisfied.

      Now I'm imagining a loop made by simply sewing together the
      ends of 8 feet of polypro strapping. I'd pass the loop
      behind the tree, then feed one end through the other. That
      should work on trees up to a foot in diameter.

      Bear
    • Debra Weisenstein
      Some very interesting experiments here, Bear. When you used the strap as a simple belt, do you mean it made one closed loop around the tree? A snug loop, or a
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 17, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Some very interesting experiments here, Bear. When you used the strap
        as a simple belt, do you mean it made one closed loop around the tree?
        A snug loop, or a loose loop touching only half the tree? I've
        generally tried to go around the tree 1 1/2 times using the Crazy
        Creek straps with buckles, but maybe this isn't necessary. I too have
        been thinking of ways to make centering the hammock easier, but was
        thinking of putting the buckles or D-rings on the hammock side, just
        beyond the bugnet attachment. The webbing straps for the trees would
        then be plain straps, attached to the trees per Ed Speer's method.
        They could stay attached to the hammock but would provide
        adjustability after the hammock was set up rather than having to undo
        the wraps and knots around the trees.

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell" <dchinell@m...>
        wrote:
        > Backpacking Log
        >
        > Temp: 60 - 85 deg F
        > Wind: Light, with occasional gusts
        > Gear: Tropical hammock, thinsulate poncho liner, poncho as
        > GI shell, 15-foot D-ring polypro straps, 9 x 9 tulle
        > mosquito net
        >
        > The main test for this trip was a pair of 15-foot poly-pro
        > straps. I had sewn a pair of D-rings into the end of each
        > strap. My idea was to wrap the straps around the trees,
        > Speer style, but leave about six inches of strap and the
        > D-rings exposed, then tie my hammock lines through the
        > D-rings.
        >
        > I put two D-rings in each strap, thinking that the straps
        > could then also be used as straps -- maybe to strap my pad
        > to the bottom of my pack, or to make a bedroll.
        >
        > It was cloudy with a promise of rain on the hike in, so when
        > I reached camp I started by putting up my tarp. This time, I
        > pitched the tarp to itself, that is, with a floating
        > ridgeline. This rig makes it simple to center the tarp.
        >
        > I tie a cord to one end of the tarp, loop it around the
        > tree, pass it back through the tarp, then rest the cord on
        > the ground, stretching it out towards the second tree. I tie
        > a cord to the other end, of the tarp, wrap it around the
        > tree, pass it back through the tarp, and tie it to the first
        > cord with a tautline hitch. (Or through a loop in the end of
        > the first cord and back onto itself.) Then, with a little
        > tension on, I can raise and adjust the tarp to it's desired
        > position.
        >
        > With the tarp up, I proceeded to my experiments with the
        > polypro webbing and D-rings.
        >
        > I wrapped the first strap as Speer recommends, holding the
        > D-ring end out from the tree about six inches. To this, I
        > tied one end of my hammock, using both D-rings as a tie-off
        > loop.
        >
        > For my first experiment, I tried using the other polypro
        > strap as a simple belt around the second tree -- like the
        > Crazy Creek system. I tied my hammock line through this
        > belt, then used the D-rings to take up the slack.
        >
        > I eased into the hammock. It actually held! I bounced and
        > swung a bit, then inspected the webbing carefully. It seemed
        > to work perfectly. I was astonished that the webbing showed
        > no tendency to slip through the D-rings. I had thought that
        > a squared buckle, like the Crazy Creek system, would be
        > needed.
        >
        > For my second experiment, I wove the hammock mains through
        > the D-rings, both lines, side-by-side, and flat. I didn't
        > really expect it to work, but miracle of miracles, this held
        > too. I quickly rigged both hammock mains this way. This made
        > it really easy to center and tension the hammock correctly.
        >
        > I spend the night with the hammock mains rigged this way.
        > Close inspection revealed no more compression of the lines
        > than would arise from knotting, and no slippage despite a
        > restless night.
        >
        > After finishing my strap experiments, I put my actual
        > ridgeline cord (plus an extra tie-out cord) in a huge loop
        > around both trees, about a foot below the polypro straps. I
        > used this to drape my tulle in an actual mosquito bar shape,
        > rather than an A-frame draped from the ridgeline.
        >
        > This rigging let me sling the net much lower, without
        > interfering with the hammock mains. I could swing freely
        > between the two mosquito net lines.
        >
        > I expected a low of 65 deg F, not 60, so I went with no pad,
        > and was cold on the bottom. Tucking the poncho liner under
        > me seemed to help some. This made me wonder whether a
        > sleeping bag might not be useful in some temps, despite the
        > material under me getting compressed.
        >
        > Around two in the morning, I was uncomfortable enough that I
        > got up to clip my poncho underneath my hammock, trying for
        > the Garlington Insulator effect. It was awkward to work in
        > the darkness. I must remember to perform my critical
        > experiments and trial runs in the daylight.
        >
        > The poncho didn't seem to help much. Maybe I had it too
        > close to the hammock bottom, and wasn't allowing a trapped
        > air space.
        >
        > The polypro straps seem bulkier and heavier than the tree
        > ropes I've been using, but they sure worked well for me.
        > Learning that the D-rings worked so well was great. Now I
        > don't have to rely on Crazy Creek straps or keep searching
        > the internet for those square buckles. But I'm still not
        > satisfied.
        >
        > Now I'm imagining a loop made by simply sewing together the
        > ends of 8 feet of polypro strapping. I'd pass the loop
        > behind the tree, then feed one end through the other. That
        > should work on trees up to a foot in diameter.
        >
        > Bear
      • David Chinell
        Debra: Yes, I made a single, loose loop, touching only half the tree. Your idea about going around 1-1/2 times is a good one, one I ve meant to try out. It
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 18, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Debra:

          Yes, I made a single, loose loop, touching only half the
          tree. Your idea about going around 1-1/2 times is a good
          one, one I've meant to try out. It would help keep the strap
          from sliding down the trunk when the hammock is empty.

          (But with any kind of loop, the hammock loses its pleasing
          swing characteristics.)

          I also think your idea about putting D-rings on Speer
          hammock lines would work. The only drawback is the extra
          weight of the rings. Is it worth it to have an easy
          adjustment? Could we just get better at estimating how to
          center the hammock?

          Actually, for a Speer hammock, I think the weight would be
          worthwhile. It's harder to justify with the way I rig my
          hammock, as it's pretty simple to retie the hammock knot,
          since it doesn't involve re-wrapping any straps.

          Glad you found it interesting. By the way, these were some
          pretty hefty D-rings. One inch across, but a bit thicker,
          maybe 3/16 inch wire. I got them from Hoggans, who also
          carry polypro strapping and will make custom stuff for you
          at reasonable prices.

          http://www.hoggans.com/

          Bear




          -----Original Message-----
          From: Debra Weisenstein [mailto:dweisens@...]
          Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 10:26 PM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Hammock Camping Re: D-ring experiment


          Some very interesting experiments here, Bear. When you used
          the strap
          as a simple belt, do you mean it made one closed loop around
          the tree?
          A snug loop, or a loose loop touching only half the tree?
          I've
          generally tried to go around the tree 1 1/2 times using the
          Crazy
          Creek straps with buckles, but maybe this isn't necessary.
          I too have
          been thinking of ways to make centering the hammock easier,
          but was
          thinking of putting the buckles or D-rings on the hammock
          side, just
          beyond the bugnet attachment. The webbing straps for the
          trees would
          then be plain straps, attached to the trees per Ed Speer's
          method.
          They could stay attached to the hammock but would provide
          adjustability after the hammock was set up rather than
          having to undo
          the wraps and knots around the trees.
        • tcoug7
          ... Excellent idea Bear..Thanks. ... Should have used the emergency blankets.... :) ... Tim
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 18, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            >
            > For my second experiment, I wove the hammock mains through
            > the D-rings, both lines, side-by-side, and flat. I didn't
            > really expect it to work, but miracle of miracles, this held
            > too. I quickly rigged both hammock mains this way. This made
            > it really easy to center and tension the hammock correctly.

            Excellent idea Bear..Thanks.
            >
            >
            > The poncho didn't seem to help much. Maybe I had it too
            > close to the hammock bottom, and wasn't allowing a trapped
            > air space.


            Should have used the emergency blankets.... :)
            >
            Tim
          • David Chinell
            Ta HAH! Touche. I actually had a lawn n garden trash bag with me, but it was too dark and buggy for me to mess with that as well as pinning on the poncho.
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 18, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              Ta HAH! Touche.

              I actually had a lawn n' garden trash bag with me, but it
              was too dark and buggy for me to mess with that as well as
              pinning on the poncho.

              Bear

              -----Original Message-----
              From: tcoug7 [mailto:tcoug7@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2003 11:39 AM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Hammock Camping Re: D-ring experiment


              >
              > For my second experiment, I wove the hammock mains through
              > the D-rings, both lines, side-by-side, and flat. I didn't
              > really expect it to work, but miracle of miracles, this
              held
              > too. I quickly rigged both hammock mains this way. This
              made
              > it really easy to center and tension the hammock
              correctly.

              Excellent idea Bear..Thanks.
              >
              >
              > The poncho didn't seem to help much. Maybe I had it too
              > close to the hammock bottom, and wasn't allowing a trapped
              > air space.


              Should have used the emergency blankets.... :)
              >
              Tim
            • Amy
              I got a new A-Symm recently. The fly geometrically seems to fit with the sticky side of the fly up. Is that normal? The slick side is facing down toward
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 23, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                I got a new A-Symm recently. The fly geometrically seems
                to fit with the "sticky" side of the fly up. Is that normal? The slick
                side is facing down toward the hammock. I guess it doesn't make
                any difference with regard to waterproofing, but pollen is sticking to
                it.

                -amy
              • Shane Steinkamp
                ... Mine is the same on both sides... ??? Shane
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 23, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  > I got a new A-Symm recently. The fly geometrically seems
                  > to fit with the "sticky" side of the fly up. Is that
                  > normal? The slick side is facing down toward the hammock.
                  > I guess it doesn't make any difference with regard to
                  > waterproofing, but pollen is sticking to it.

                  Mine is the same on both sides... ???

                  Shane
                • Marge Prothman
                  I have a Hennessy A-Sym, but my fly is Silnylon and there is no right or wrong side, and there sure is not any sticky side. I would ask your dealer what kind
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 23, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I have a Hennessy A-Sym, but my fly is Silnylon and there is no right or
                    wrong side,
                    and there sure is not any sticky side. I would ask your dealer what kind of
                    fly you have and I was just assuming you had a Hennessy.

                    Cheers, Marge




                    > I got a new A-Symm recently. The fly geometrically seems
                    > to fit with the "sticky" side of the fly up. Is that
                    > normal? The slick side is facing down toward the hammock.
                    > I guess it doesn't make any difference with regard to
                    > waterproofing, but pollen is sticking to it.




                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • Amy
                    ... Oh, it s definitely a Hennessey. Got it from Rosaleen at the Ruck. Maybe I ll take one out of the bag at REI and see what it s like. -amy
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 24, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Sunday, March 23, 2003, at 10:59 PM, Marge Prothman wrote:

                      > I have a Hennessy A-Sym, but my fly is Silnylon and there is no right or
                      > wrong side,
                      > and there sure is not any sticky side. I would ask your dealer what
                      > kind of
                      > fly you have and I was just assuming you had a Hennessy.
                      >
                      > Cheers, Marge
                      >
                      >

                      Oh, it's definitely a Hennessey. Got it from Rosaleen at the Ruck.
                      Maybe I'll
                      take one out of the bag at REI and see what it's like.

                      -amy
                    • Tom Palmer
                      Hi Amy, I have an expedition and today as I was taking it down, I noticed the fly did have a slight stickiness to one side. My fly is symmetrical so I will
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 24, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi Amy,

                        I have an expedition and today as I was taking it down, I noticed the
                        fly did have a slight stickiness to one side. My fly is symmetrical
                        so I will keep the slippery side up so the pollen will stick less,
                        hopefully. On your fly can you flip and rotate it to have the same
                        coverage and the slippery side up?

                        Palmer

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Amy <askowronek@m...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I got a new A-Symm recently. The fly geometrically seems
                        > to fit with the "sticky" side of the fly up. Is that normal? The
                        slick
                        > side is facing down toward the hammock. I guess it doesn't make
                        > any difference with regard to waterproofing, but pollen is sticking
                        to
                        > it.
                        >
                        > -amy
                      • Amy
                        ... Not from what I can tell, sadly. -amy
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 25, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On Monday, March 24, 2003, at 11:24 PM, Tom Palmer wrote:

                          > Hi Amy,
                          >
                          > I have an expedition and today as I was taking it down, I noticed the
                          > fly did have a slight stickiness to one side. My fly is symmetrical
                          > so I will keep the slippery side up so the pollen will stick less,
                          > hopefully. On your fly can you flip and rotate it to have the same
                          > coverage and the slippery side up?
                          >
                          >

                          Not from what I can tell, sadly.

                          -amy
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.