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Re: [Hammock Camping] Closed cell pad condensation woes

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  • chcoa
    Richard, this test has not been aborted we are still in the long term testing phase. I m one of the testers and likely the one you are refering to that felt
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 13 9:55 PM
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      Richard, this test has not been aborted we are still in the long term
      testing phase. I'm one of the testers and likely the one you are
      refering to that "felt" it had a limit of 50 F. Let me set the
      record straight, my long term report has not been filed so I have not
      reached any conclusions as of yet about the systems limits.

      Where I have had problems so far is in conditions where wind is
      present. However, I have used the set up successfully down to 27 F
      but that was in combo with a closed cell pad in the a hammock with me.

      I have yet to test the overcover as I did not receive it until later
      in the testing period.

      It's hard to answer your question because really had too many
      acceptable nights in my hammock - at least not throughout the winter
      and last fall.

      jamie in az


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "richard_nisley"
      <richard_nisley@m...> wrote:
      >
      > The aborted HH SS testing done in Backpack Gear Test had mixed
      reviews
      > with at least one of the participants feeling the system had a
      limit of
      > about 50 degrees. What acceptable temp, bag, and clothing
      combinations
      > have you experienced?
      >
      > Richard
    • john hill
      I had a 13 degree night in February with my HH Explorer, blue pad (wallyworld) inside my fleece sleeping bag - both on the inside of the hammock, midweight
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 21 7:07 PM
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        I had a 13 degree night in February with my HH Explorer, blue pad (wallyworld) inside my fleece sleeping bag - both on the inside of the hammock, midweight long underware, boy scout pants, flannel sleeping pants, shirt, acrylic sweater, nylon pullover jacket, liner socks, 2 pair hiking socks, Thinsulate toboggan cap (down over my eyes even), and finally when it got to the mid teens my feet inside my vinyl, quilted lined rain jacket, under a 30 degree Slumberjack sleeping bag. No condensation but I could have used more on my legs and feet. Maybe I'm just getting old. Other than my feet and legs I was fine except when I hung my butt off the edge of my pad after it got into the teens. After that I just slept on my back so I could stay on the pad. Somebody has told of a sheet called Neat Sheet that might work instead of a fleece bag, be lighter too. I haven't found it locally yet and haven't looked on the web either. Going to be summer soon. I don't know the weight of all this
        stuff but i wore all of the clotes up except the rain jacket and the nylon pullover.

        chcoa <jdeben@...> wrote:
        Since I have not been having very positive results with the HH
        Supershelter I'm testing for BGT I took along a 3/4 length closed
        cell pad (the target brand one) with me on my last b-pack trip just
        in case. The temps were in the mid 40's (so not really too cold) but
        I became chilled during the night and ended up using the blue pad
        under me INSIDE the hammock. Other than clothing, nylon hiking pants
        and a lightweight fleece shirt, I was laying directly on the blue pad
        since I use a homemade quilt on top of me. Weird thing was, I was
        still cold! I figured it was becuase I was damp.

        I remember many others posting here about condensation build up on
        their pad and if I would of had something to lay on I would of gladly
        put it between me and the pad but I was wearing everything I packed
        in except a very damp t-shirt. I don't want to add more weight to my
        pack but I'm certain I need some kind of cover for the blue pad if I
        intend on using it in this capacity again. Has anyone had any
        experience with silk as a pad cover? Furthermore, I'd like to hear
        some opinions on whether or not silk would be a good choice for this.

        Thanks
        jamie in AZ





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      • Rick
        Hi Jamie, Having used a blue pad frequently for warmth, I almost always used a polyester tee between myself and the pad. In temperatures below 15 F I
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 22 3:18 AM
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          Hi Jamie,

          Having used a blue pad frequently for warmth, I almost always used a
          polyester tee between myself and the pad. In temperatures below 15 F I
          sometimes have used a fleece pullover. My back does become moist
          against the pad, but dries quickly. Perhaps part of my success is
          turning from one side to the other about once an hour, though my turning
          is often not a 180 degree roll, more like 90 degrees total.

          Rick



          > Other than clothing, nylon hiking pants
          > and a lightweight fleece shirt, I was laying directly on the blue pad
          > since I use a homemade quilt on top of me. Weird thing was, I was
          > still cold! I figured it was becuase I was damp.
          >
          > I remember many others posting here about condensation build up on
          > their pad and if I would of had something to lay on I would of gladly
          > put it between me and the pad but I was wearing everything I packed
          > in except a very damp t-shirt. I don't want to add more weight to my
          > pack but I'm certain I need some kind of cover for the blue pad if I
          > intend on using it in this capacity again.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Chinell
          The Neat Sheet is just a sort of synthetic groundsheet. It s main advantage is that it repels dirt and leaves fairly well. It wouldn t be warmer than a fleece
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 22 9:04 AM
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            The Neat Sheet is just a sort of synthetic groundsheet. It's
            main advantage is that it repels dirt and leaves fairly
            well. It wouldn't be warmer than a fleece bag.

            http://www.neatsheetstore.com/

            My most important warmth tools are:

            - Closed cell foam padding - in 20-24 x 36 inch panels for
            flexible coverage
            - Thinsulate poncho liner for a quilt or top blanket
            - Speer Pea Pod for really cold weather

            Insulating clothing doesn't seem to help me as much as these
            things do, with the exception of hoods, gloves, and socks.
            I have a fleece hood that I use in almost all weather but
            the warmest. I always take a pair of SmartWool socks to
            sleep in. Gloves are useful to keep my fingers flexible and
            keep bugs away. I like the kind that look like mittens, but
            flip back to expose your fingers for fine work.

            Bear
          • chcoa
            The NEat Sheet is a possibility. Since Shane S. posted his pad idea, which uses the Neat Sheet I have considered it. It only weighs 8.8oz if you cut the
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 22 11:59 PM
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              The NEat Sheet is a possibility. Since Shane S. posted his pad idea,
              which uses the Neat Sheet I have considered it. It only weighs 8.8oz
              if you cut the metal corner weights out and I'm sure I wouldn't need
              all the fabric just for a pad cover either. This is a definite
              option depending on it's wicking properties. Fleece is so nice for
              that I don't know how it could be trumped.

              Thanks for posting your experience. I appreciat the ideas.

              Jamie in az


              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, john hill <nil_dog@y...> wrote:
              > I had a 13 degree night in February with my HH Explorer, blue pad
              (wallyworld) inside my fleece sleeping bag - both on the inside of
              the hammock, midweight long underware, boy scout pants, flannel
              sleeping pants, shirt, acrylic sweater, nylon pullover jacket, liner
              socks, 2 pair hiking socks, Thinsulate toboggan cap (down over my
              eyes even), and finally when it got to the mid teens my feet inside
              my vinyl, quilted lined rain jacket, under a 30 degree Slumberjack
              sleeping bag. No condensation but I could have used more on my legs
              and feet. Maybe I'm just getting old. Other than my feet and legs I
              was fine except when I hung my butt off the edge of my pad after it
              got into the teens. After that I just slept on my back so I could
              stay on the pad. Somebody has told of a sheet called Neat Sheet that
              might work instead of a fleece bag, be lighter too. I haven't found
              it locally yet and haven't looked on the web either. Going to be
              summer soon. I don't know the weight of all this
              > stuff but i wore all of the clotes up except the rain jacket and
              the nylon pullover.
              >
            • chcoa
              Ahhh now a polyester or poly mix material as a cover, now that s an idea. I ll have to look into that too. I too rotate quite often through the night so I
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 23 12:02 AM
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                Ahhh now a polyester or poly mix material as a cover, now that's an
                idea. I'll have to look into that too.

                I too rotate quite often through the night so I don't think that's an
                issue. For me, I would "roll over" and then that part of me would be
                colder since it was damp. I'm really thinking clothing choice was
                the main issue but a cover of some kind can't hurt.

                jamie in az

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
                > Hi Jamie,
                >
                > Having used a blue pad frequently for warmth, I almost always used
                a
                > polyester tee between myself and the pad. In temperatures below 15
                F I
                > sometimes have used a fleece pullover. My back does become moist
                > against the pad, but dries quickly. Perhaps part of my success is
                > turning from one side to the other about once an hour, though my
                turning
                > is often not a 180 degree roll, more like 90 degrees total.
                >
                > Rick
                >
                >
                >
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