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Hammock for bike camping

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  • Paul V.
    I m looking for a hammock to use for bike camping. That means that weight is important but not as important as when ultralight backpacking. What is very
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 8, 2005
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      I'm looking for a hammock to use for bike camping. That means that
      weight is important but not as important as when ultralight backpacking.

      What is very important is to get a good nights sleep because you are
      your bike's motor, so comfort is top priority. I have slept in a net
      hammock which was comfortable but could be too cold in the mountains.

      I would hope to get to areas like the plains or the southwest where
      there may be no trees, so I would need some way to rig the sleeping
      system as a bivvy sack to sleep on the ground, if there is nothing to
      hang from. The bivvy sack/tarp could be a different system in
      addition to the hammock if they were light enough to carry both.

      It should be easy to hang and pack down because some nights would be
      free camping along the road somewhere.

      Rain protection, wind protection, bug protection and protection from
      chills are important. I would hope to use the hammock as a lounge
      when taking a day off due to bad weather (wind, rain, snow), laziness,
      illness or injury.

      I guess I am looking for a luxury sleeping system that is easy to pack
      up, relatively lightweight (compared to a tent), and can be "lived in"
      for days at a time. What combination of hammock, sleeping bag, tarp
      and bug protection would you recommend?

      I'm interested in either commercial products or ideas for how to make
      one myself.

      Thanks for any help you can provide!
    • Moz
      ... I ve used both a home-made hammock, and my current Hennessy hammock for cycle touring. Making one is striaght-forward, but does require a sewing machine
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 8, 2005
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        Paul V. said:
        > I'm looking for a hammock to use for bike camping.

        I've used both a home-made hammock, and my current Hennessy hammock
        for cycle touring. Making one is striaght-forward, but does require a
        sewing machine and some time. I saw a Hennessy on sale for less than
        the cost of a cheap second hand sewing machine... so I bought it.

        There's a few comments scattered through
        http://www.moz.net.nz/photo/2004/01/01-tour/ on the subject, and even
        some photos. The www.hennessyhammock.com/ works well and is light and
        easy to pitch. The FAQ will have heaps more links and so on I'm sure.

        I did another tour this Christmas (summer!) and then went to Tasmania
        and camped in the forest. The hammock works well, and the totally
        bug-proof nature was again a great bonus.

        > What is very important is to get a good nights sleep because you are
        > your bike's motor, so comfort is top priority. I have slept in a net
        > hammock which was comfortable but...

        Making sure before you start the trip that you can reliably get a good
        night's sleep in the hammock is important. You'll still need a
        sleeping mat of some sort, and there are a huge number of theories on
        light ways to stay warm. I go the the decent sleeping bag and mat,
        myself, as it means I can ground camp if I need to (the Hennessy can
        be pitched on the ground).

        Big advantages are the fast setup time (note the photo of me putting
        it up so I have somewhere to sit for lunch), compact size (no poles)
        and lightness. I have camped in camping grounds with it with no
        problems, but stealth camping is much better (and somewhat easier with
        a hammock).

        Moz
      • zippydooda
        Just wanted to put in a vote for a thick closed cell pad. Less slippery than a thermarest, less bunchy than an thin closed cell (and more comfy if you got the
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 8, 2005
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          Just wanted to put in a vote for a thick closed cell pad. Less
          slippery than a thermarest, less bunchy than an thin closed cell (and
          more comfy if you got the ground). It will take up quite a bit of
          space but I think it is worth it.

          Also, have a look at some people's photos of tying off to a car, or
          or the one-pole-method. I know you won't have a car, but it shows
          how creative you can get. And the one-pole idea might come in handy
          for you, using the bike as your pole.

          Have fun. Be careful.

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Moz <list@m...> wrote:
          > Paul V. said:
          <snip> night's sleep in the hammock is important. You'll still need a
          > sleeping mat of some sort, and there are a huge number of theories
          on
          > light ways to stay warm. I go the the decent sleeping bag and mat,
          > myself, as it means I can ground camp if I need to (the Hennessy can
          > be pitched on the ground).
          >
          > Big advantages are the fast setup time (note the photo of me putting
          > it up so I have somewhere to sit for lunch), compact size (no poles)
          > and lightness. I have camped in camping grounds with it with no
          > problems, but stealth camping is much better (and somewhat easier
          with
          > a hammock).
          >
          > Moz
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