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Re: Ridge lines for tarps??

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  • ptoddf@aol.com
    Big advantage of ridge line under the tarp is for hanging gear and gear bags. Very effective. I use one on my MacCat hammock tarp, which doesn t need a ridge
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 25, 2005
      Big advantage of ridge line under the tarp is for hanging gear and gear
      bags. Very effective. I use one on my MacCat hammock tarp, which doesn't need a
      ridge line, just for that.
      I don't much like ridge lines for the hammock, like the one that
      standardizes the hang for Hennessey hammocks. It's part of their integrated design, and
      a beautiful job that is.

      For open hammock with no ridge line, the line for the tarp does the overhead
      clothesline type job. I never leave the trail head without one.

      Best, Todd in Tarzana.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rick
      I agree with what Todd has said so well. Having a line under a tarp is very useful. However, the way I do this is to sew an extra loop at each end of the
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 26, 2005
        I agree with what Todd has said so well. Having a line under a tarp is
        very useful. However, the way I do this is to sew an extra loop at each
        end of the ridge line. At each end, I have one loop facing toward the
        tree to which I attach the suspension line. However I also sew a loop
        under the tarp facing the opposite direction. Once the tarp is set up,
        I tie a cord from one end of the tarp to the other. I do not usually
        remove this cord to pack up the tarp. The tarp now has its own integral
        ridge line.

        This was a feature of a Jardine like tarp that I made from directions
        found on the Internet 3 years ago. It has worked very well. I use the
        ridge line as a place to hang my glasses, and a place to hang my
        headlamp. When I fold half the tarp back for nice weather, to the left
        side or the right side, I still have the full ridge line available to
        hang socks to dry.

        A photo of this can be seen in the 4th and 5th pictures here:

        http://www.imrisk.com/bwca03/bwca03.htm

        Risk

        ptoddf@... wrote:

        >Big advantage of ridge line under the tarp is for hanging gear and gear
        >bags. Very effective. I use one on my MacCat hammock tarp, which doesn't need a
        >ridge line, just for that.
        >I don't much like ridge lines for the hammock, like the one that
        >standardizes the hang for Hennessey hammocks. It's part of their integrated design, and
        >a beautiful job that is.
        >
        >For open hammock with no ridge line, the line for the tarp does the overhead
        >clothesline type job. I never leave the trail head without one.
        >
        >Best, Todd in Tarzana.
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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        >
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Steve
        With or without a ridgeline I ve always had a problem centering my tarp. Now I use a ridgeline with 2 facing prusik knots with attached mini carabineers. After
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 26, 2005
          With or without a ridgeline I've always had a problem centering my
          tarp. Now I use a ridgeline with 2 facing prusik knots with attached
          mini carabineers. After tying and tensioning the ridgeline I attach
          the tarp to the mini carabineers, then it's very easy to slide the
          knots to center and tension the ridgeline and to make adjustments.

          Cheers,

          Steve
        • jack_tier
          Steve , Good idea....little extra wgt though....alternatively tying slip knots generally takes two, 10 second adjustments then it is perfect...bonus is the
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 26, 2005
            Steve ,

            Good idea....little extra wgt though....alternatively tying slip knots
            generally takes two, 10 second adjustments then it is perfect...bonus
            is the slip knots pop right out in the morning for teardown.

            jack

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <millergear@n...> wrote:
            >
            > With or without a ridgeline I've always had a problem centering my
            > tarp. Now I use a ridgeline with 2 facing prusik knots with attached
            > mini carabineers. After tying and tensioning the ridgeline I attach
            > the tarp to the mini carabineers, then it's very easy to slide the
            > knots to center and tension the ridgeline and to make adjustments.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Steve
          • Steve
            Jack, Did you mean using a line at each end of the tarp and no ridgeline? The extra weight is minimal if using a ridgeline. Cheers, Steve ... knots ...
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 27, 2005
              Jack,

              Did you mean using a line at each end of the tarp and no ridgeline?
              The extra weight is minimal if using a ridgeline.

              Cheers,

              Steve

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jack_tier" <jacktier@c...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Steve ,
              >
              > Good idea....little extra wgt though....alternatively tying slip
              knots
              > generally takes two, 10 second adjustments then it is
              perfect...bonus
              > is the slip knots pop right out in the morning for teardown.
              >
              > jack
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <millergear@n...>
              wrote:
              > >
              > > With or without a ridgeline I've always had a problem centering
              my
              > > tarp. Now I use a ridgeline with 2 facing prusik knots with
              attached
              > > mini carabineers. After tying and tensioning the ridgeline I
              attach
              > > the tarp to the mini carabineers, then it's very easy to slide
              the
              > > knots to center and tension the ridgeline and to make adjustments.
              > >
              > > Cheers,
              > >
              > > Steve
            • jack_tier
              Steve, The set up I use, FWIW, is a 9 foot 2mm highly flexible accessory cord on each corner, about 1 oz total for the 4 cords...Routinely, I do not use a
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 28, 2005
                Steve,

                The set up I use, FWIW, is a 9 foot 2mm highly flexible accessory
                cord on each corner, about 1 oz total for the 4 cords...Routinely, I
                do not use a ridge line....one, less weight...two, althought others
                write of using ridge lines for years without wear, I believe daily
                use for 6 months is less than ideal for wear....Three, if I want to
                dry something I place it over the Hammock ridgline, spread over the
                bug screen ( HH), this doubles the surface exposed to air of normal
                hanging ( note, with poly pro clothes, the water in an item drains
                to the lowest point, so periodic removal and wringing out or
                squeezing this gathering water speed the drying).... Four, I know
                that 9 feet is a long side cord...but ... I have found that 60 % of
                the time its length lets me tie off to a convient tree/bush etc.

                Beside the weight of the ridge cord, my comment was primarily about
                the two mini biners you mentioned in your set-up.

                To all who ask, Why 9 ft and not 10? Personal experience, this is
                what works for me...and meets my philosophy of reduce to what works
                but don't sacrifice comfort and reasonable convience.

                BTW, my bear bag uses this same type cord and has been reduced to 32
                feet....it gets hung every night without fail...and 32 feet has
                never proved to short. ( Less than 1 oz compared to 5+ oz for 50
                feet of para cord routinely used).

                Are you coming to Trail Days?

                Jack, aka Peter_pan

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <millergear@n...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Jack,
                >
                > Did you mean using a line at each end of the tarp and no ridgeline?
                > The extra weight is minimal if using a ridgeline.
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Steve
                >
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jack_tier" <jacktier@c...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Steve ,
                > >
                > > Good idea....little extra wgt though....alternatively tying slip
                > knots
                > > generally takes two, 10 second adjustments then it is
                > perfect...bonus
                > > is the slip knots pop right out in the morning for teardown.
                > >
                > > jack
                > >
                > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <millergear@n...>
                > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > With or without a ridgeline I've always had a problem
                centering
                > my
                > > > tarp. Now I use a ridgeline with 2 facing prusik knots with
                > attached
                > > > mini carabineers. After tying and tensioning the ridgeline I
                > attach
                > > > the tarp to the mini carabineers, then it's very easy to slide
                > the
                > > > knots to center and tension the ridgeline and to make
                adjustments.
                > > >
                > > > Cheers,
                > > >
                > > > Steve
              • Steve
                Jack, Great minds think alike, (and so do ours). I use 9 corner cords also; because it works for me and it s easy for me to measure with my 6 arm spread. I
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 28, 2005
                  Jack,

                  Great minds think alike, (and so do ours). I use 9' corner cords
                  also; because it works for me and it's easy for me to measure with
                  my 6'arm spread. I use braided mason twine for the tieouts, very
                  light and strong enough. If something gives I would rather the line
                  break than have the tarp rip. I also use mason twine to hang my food
                  bag.

                  When I was Hennessy hanger (that's a whole other subject)I didn't
                  use a separate ridgeline either. Now with my side entry hammock I
                  use the ridgeline for ease of adjusting the set and for hanging
                  gear. At a 1/4oz each the ease of use make the mini biners well
                  worth the weight (for me). I also use two of them to hold my pad in
                  place. Total weight; 10' hammock, full netting, stakes, corner
                  lines, 4 mini biners, ridgeline and 8' x 10' tarp = 40 oz of luxury.
                  If the weather forecast is really good I'll use a 9' x 5' tarp and
                  save 6 oz.

                  Cheers,

                  Steve

                  PS - Can't make Trail Days.

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jack_tier" <jacktier@c...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Steve,
                  >
                  > The set up I use, FWIW, is a 9 foot 2mm highly flexible accessory
                  > cord on each corner, about 1 oz total for the 4 cords...Routinely,
                  I
                  > do not use a ridge line....one, less weight...two, althought
                  others
                  > write of using ridge lines for years without wear, I believe daily
                  > use for 6 months is less than ideal for wear....Three, if I want
                  to
                  > dry something I place it over the Hammock ridgline, spread over
                  the
                  > bug screen ( HH), this doubles the surface exposed to air of
                  normal
                  > hanging ( note, with poly pro clothes, the water in an item drains
                  > to the lowest point, so periodic removal and wringing out or
                  > squeezing this gathering water speed the drying).... Four, I know
                  > that 9 feet is a long side cord...but ... I have found that 60 %
                  of
                  > the time its length lets me tie off to a convient tree/bush etc.
                  >
                  > Beside the weight of the ridge cord, my comment was primarily
                  about
                  > the two mini biners you mentioned in your set-up.
                  >
                  > To all who ask, Why 9 ft and not 10? Personal experience, this
                  is
                  > what works for me...and meets my philosophy of reduce to what
                  works
                  > but don't sacrifice comfort and reasonable convience.
                  >
                  > BTW, my bear bag uses this same type cord and has been reduced to
                  32
                  > feet....it gets hung every night without fail...and 32 feet has
                  > never proved to short. ( Less than 1 oz compared to 5+ oz for 50
                  > feet of para cord routinely used).
                  >
                  > Are you coming to Trail Days?
                  >
                  > Jack, aka Peter_pan
                  >
                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <millergear@n...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Jack,
                • ptoddf@aol.com
                  Excellent comments, thanks to all. Amazing how much there is to flesh out in this one very specialized subject. Here s another point, if this duplicates
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 28, 2005
                    Excellent comments, thanks to all. Amazing how much there is to flesh out in
                    this one very
                    specialized subject. Here's another point, if this duplicates earlier
                    posting, I didn't see it:

                    What I am doing this year with my open, aka "side entry" hammock, is use a
                    ridge line below my MacCat tarp as described, but I'm also using snakeskins on
                    the tarp only.

                    What this means is I can put up my tarp in skins, with ridge line outside
                    and below the skins, and have a "thick rope" only overhead, with gear in
                    silnylon stuff sacks and items like sandals just hanging on hooks on the line. This
                    means almost unblocked sky and star viewing, very important to me.

                    If weather moves in, I can unskin and stake out tarp in seconds. I won't
                    hang any sacks right over my head area, but hang them closer to the foot end to
                    keep a nearly clear view. I'm using the HH skins that I never liked or used
                    with that hammock. I put 10 foot lines on the new config, to see how that
                    does. Drilled holes in 4 of the aluminum Y stakes so they're captive on the
                    lines, can't get lost. Gettin' there!

                    Best, Todd in Tarzana.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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