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cold weather idea - bomb hatch

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  • schrochem
    I just peek in every once in awhile so I am sure someone has already come up with this idea, if not it sounds pretty viable. Instead of an underquilt or a taco
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 20, 2005
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      I just peek in every once in awhile so I am sure someone has already
      come up with this idea, if not it sounds pretty viable.

      Instead of an underquilt or a taco I thought of a combination of the
      two. The best I can describe it is a bomb hatch, which basically
      means two "flaps" of fabric hanging down below the sleeper. They
      will be a nice width apart to cover shoulders and hang down to the
      length of insulation you want to put in.
      If that is visually hard to depict maybe some letter sketching

      ________________
      | |
      | |

      at the bottom of the flaps there will be velcro. This way you put a
      quilt, clothing, leaves, whatever, and can cinch it up snug to
      bottom of the hammock.This would save weight because only minimal
      fabric and insulation would be needed because only the important
      part is beind insulated. You could double over a summer quilt for
      extra warmth, maybe even taper for more minimum weight.
      Been done?
      Well it is getting warm here in texas so I won't be trying this out
      until next year, but if anyone has done it or plans to, please let
      me know.
      thanks
      scott
    • jack_tier
      Scott, Check out the Weather Shield ( www.jacksrbetter.com )and consider it in combo with the Nest or No Sniveller under quilts...believe it defines what you
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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        Scott,
        Check out the Weather Shield ( www.jacksrbetter.com )and consider
        it in combo with the Nest or No Sniveller under quilts...believe it
        defines what you are describing...easily handles temps into lower
        20s...highly breathable, waterproof and wind proof also...see Sgt
        Rock's WWW.Hikinghq.net for review
        Jack

        .--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem" <schrochem@g...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I just peek in every once in awhile so I am sure someone has
        already
        > come up with this idea, if not it sounds pretty viable.
        >
        > Instead of an underquilt or a taco I thought of a combination of
        the
        > two. The best I can describe it is a bomb hatch, which basically
        > means two "flaps" of fabric hanging down below the sleeper. They
        > will be a nice width apart to cover shoulders and hang down to the
        > length of insulation you want to put in.
        > If that is visually hard to depict maybe some letter sketching
        >
        > ________________
        > | |
        > | |
        >
        > at the bottom of the flaps there will be velcro. This way you put
        a
        > quilt, clothing, leaves, whatever, and can cinch it up snug to
        > bottom of the hammock.This would save weight because only minimal
        > fabric and insulation would be needed because only the important
        > part is beind insulated. You could double over a summer quilt for
        > extra warmth, maybe even taper for more minimum weight.
        > Been done?
        > Well it is getting warm here in texas so I won't be trying this
        out
        > until next year, but if anyone has done it or plans to, please let
        > me know.
        > thanks
        > scott
      • schrochem
        I guess I did give kind of a crappy description. I am familiar with your products Jack and almost bought an underquilt b/c I was too busy this winter. However,
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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          I guess I did give kind of a crappy description. I am familiar with
          your products Jack and almost bought an underquilt b/c I was too busy
          this winter. However, I made it through winter (down here) without
          one. Your system looks similar to what I envisioned but mine is sewn
          in and has two flaps, so the amount of insulation can vary from very
          thin to a big as you like and still be cinched up tight to the bottom
          of the hammock.
          I uploaded a pdf in the files section called bombhatch001.pdf Perhaps
          my crude drawings will better explain what I failed in words. Anyone
          done this?
          Scott

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jack_tier" <jacktier@c...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Scott,
          > Check out the Weather Shield ( www.jacksrbetter.com )and consider
          > it in combo with the Nest or No Sniveller under quilts...believe it
          > defines what you are describing...easily handles temps into lower
          > 20s...highly breathable, waterproof and wind proof also...see Sgt
          > Rock's WWW.Hikinghq.net for review
          > Jack
          >
          > .--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem"
          <schrochem@g...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > I just peek in every once in awhile so I am sure someone has
          > already
          > > come up with this idea, if not it sounds pretty viable.
          > >
          > > Instead of an underquilt or a taco I thought of a combination of
          > the
          > > two. The best I can describe it is a bomb hatch, which basically
          > > means two "flaps" of fabric hanging down below the sleeper. They
          > > will be a nice width apart to cover shoulders and hang down to
          the
          > > length of insulation you want to put in.
          > > If that is visually hard to depict maybe some letter sketching
          > >
          > > ________________
          > > | |
          > > | |
          > >
          > > at the bottom of the flaps there will be velcro. This way you put
          > a
          > > quilt, clothing, leaves, whatever, and can cinch it up snug to
          > > bottom of the hammock.This would save weight because only minimal
          > > fabric and insulation would be needed because only the important
          > > part is beind insulated. You could double over a summer quilt for
          > > extra warmth, maybe even taper for more minimum weight.
          > > Been done?
          > > Well it is getting warm here in texas so I won't be trying this
          > out
          > > until next year, but if anyone has done it or plans to, please
          let
          > > me know.
          > > thanks
          > > scott
        • Ray Garlington
          ... wrote: file section / bombhatch001.pdf Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing is weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem" <schrochem@g...>
            wrote:
            file section / bombhatch001.pdf

            Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing is
            weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle pricks through
            the ripstop nylon; however, you could probably just glue the bomb-
            bay doors to the hammock bottom since it won't be carrying much
            weight.

            Some ideas:
            Make one short door and one long door. Put 3 or 4 short velcro
            strips on the short door and matching ones on the long door. Long
            door goes over to short door and velcros up. Problem: gap along
            the side.

            Same long / short door idea, but glue the long door in position
            along each long side. Short door provides some adjustment and
            access to the slot to insert the insulator. Problem: still uses
            velcro.

            Glue both doors to the bottom with a central overlaping slit. Load
            insulation via the slit. Problem: somewhat restricted access. could
            just leave insulation in place and use the equivalent of python
            skins.
          • Ralph Oborn
            How bout not actually attaching the bomb bays doors tothe hammock? Have real fine rope or twine either in the hammock (under a thin pad or over the top of a
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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              How 'bout not actually attaching the bomb bays doors tothe hammock?
              Have real fine rope or twine either in the hammock (under a thin pad
              or over the top of a ridge line to hold the bomb bay doors up?
              Ralph Oborn


              On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 18:09:25 -0000, Ray Garlington <rgarling@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem" <schrochem@g...>
              > wrote:
              > file section / bombhatch001.pdf
              >
              > Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing is
              > weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle pricks through
              > the ripstop nylon; however, you could probably just glue the bomb-
              > bay doors to the hammock bottom since it won't be carrying much
              > weight.
              >
              > Some ideas:
              > Make one short door and one long door. Put 3 or 4 short velcro
              > strips on the short door and matching ones on the long door. Long
              > door goes over to short door and velcros up. Problem: gap along
              > the side.
              >
              > Same long / short door idea, but glue the long door in position
              > along each long side. Short door provides some adjustment and
              > access to the slot to insert the insulator. Problem: still uses
              > velcro.
              >
              > Glue both doors to the bottom with a central overlaping slit. Load
              > insulation via the slit. Problem: somewhat restricted access. could
              > just leave insulation in place and use the equivalent of python
              > skins.
              >
              >
              >
              >
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            • Dave Bellinski
              Ray, You mentioned gluing the doors on. What type of glue do you use with ripstop? Will the same glue work with sil-nylon? Light ning _____ From: Ray
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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                Ray,



                You mentioned gluing the doors on. What type of glue do you use with
                ripstop? Will the same glue work with sil-nylon?



                Light'ning



                _____

                From: Ray Garlington [mailto:rgarling@...]
                Sent: Monday, March 21, 2005 1:09 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: cold weather idea - bomb hatch




                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem" <schrochem@g...>
                wrote:
                file section / bombhatch001.pdf

                Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing is
                weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle pricks through
                the ripstop nylon; however, you could probably just glue the bomb-
                bay doors to the hammock bottom since it won't be carrying much
                weight.

                Some ideas:
                Make one short door and one long door. Put 3 or 4 short velcro
                strips on the short door and matching ones on the long door. Long
                door goes over to short door and velcros up. Problem: gap along
                the side.

                Same long / short door idea, but glue the long door in position
                along each long side. Short door provides some adjustment and
                access to the slot to insert the insulator. Problem: still uses
                velcro.

                Glue both doors to the bottom with a central overlaping slit. Load
                insulation via the slit. Problem: somewhat restricted access. could
                just leave insulation in place and use the equivalent of python
                skins.








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              • Ray Garlington
                ... This would be an experiment for me. I have used fabric cements with cotton-like fabrics that work well, but they are not very flexible. I ve also used
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Dave Bellinski
                  <dave.bellinski@o...> wrote:
                  > What type of glue do you use with
                  > ripstop? Will the same glue work with sil-nylon?

                  This would be an experiment for me. I have used fabric cements with
                  cotton-like fabrics that work well, but they are not very flexible.
                  I've also used silicon caulk as an adhesive and it works pretty
                  well. Not sure how well it would do in this sort of application.
                • jwj32542
                  Sounds like an innovative idea. When compared to the Garlington Taco and JRB Weathershield, I understand the difference in your design, but not the difference
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 21, 2005
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                    Sounds like an innovative idea. When compared to the Garlington
                    Taco and JRB Weathershield, I understand the difference in your
                    design, but not the difference in function.

                    If the purpose is to provide wind resistance and to hold insulation
                    against the hammock, why add the weight and complexity of velcro,
                    when you can just whipa layer of RN to the ends of the hammock?

                    Jeff
                  • schrochem
                    Thanks for the suggestions on this. I can see the limitations of sewing it to the bottom and using velcro. Having thought some more about it how about this:
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 24, 2005
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                      Thanks for the suggestions on this. I can see the limitations of
                      sewing it to the bottom and using velcro.
                      Having thought some more about it how about this:

                      Only ONE long door, held closely to the hammock with shock cord or
                      equivalent. Where the short door would be, just have another length
                      of shock cord. The insulation can be installed and the long door
                      pulled up through the shock cord on the short side pulled snug. I am
                      still thinking about how to keep it there, but this would eliminate
                      velcro and only use minimal fabric and cord. Heck this could even be
                      made in no time flat.
                      Any other suggestions
                      thanks
                      scott


                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
                      wrote:
                      > How 'bout not actually attaching the bomb bays doors tothe hammock?
                      > Have real fine rope or twine either in the hammock (under a thin pad
                      > or over the top of a ridge line to hold the bomb bay doors up?
                      > Ralph Oborn
                      >
                      >
                      > On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 18:09:25 -0000, Ray Garlington <rgarling@y...>
                      wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem"
                      <schrochem@g...>
                      > > wrote:
                      > > file section / bombhatch001.pdf
                      > >
                      > > Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing is
                      > > weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle pricks
                      through
                      > > the ripstop nylon; however, you could probably just glue the bomb-
                      > > bay doors to the hammock bottom since it won't be carrying much
                      > > weight.
                      > >
                      > > Some ideas:
                      > > Make one short door and one long door. Put 3 or 4 short velcro
                      > > strips on the short door and matching ones on the long door.
                      Long
                      > > door goes over to short door and velcros up. Problem: gap along
                      > > the side.
                      > >
                      > > Same long / short door idea, but glue the long door in position
                      > > along each long side. Short door provides some adjustment and
                      > > access to the slot to insert the insulator. Problem: still uses
                      > > velcro.
                      > >
                      > > Glue both doors to the bottom with a central overlaping slit.
                      Load
                      > > insulation via the slit. Problem: somewhat restricted access.
                      could
                      > > just leave insulation in place and use the equivalent of python
                      > > skins.
                      > >
                    • jwj32542
                      Scott, Check out this link. http://home.chattanooga.net/~cdp/hammock/hammock.htm He made a baffled second layer that he can insert and remove insulation using
                      Message 10 of 10 , Mar 25, 2005
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                        Scott,

                        Check out this link.
                        http://home.chattanooga.net/~cdp/hammock/hammock.htm

                        He made a baffled second layer that he can insert and remove
                        insulation using a simple overlap. Also saves the weight and
                        complexity of velcro or shockcord.

                        Just another idea...might be helpful in your design.

                        Jeff

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem" <schrochem@g...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Thanks for the suggestions on this. I can see the limitations of
                        > sewing it to the bottom and using velcro.
                        > Having thought some more about it how about this:
                        >
                        > Only ONE long door, held closely to the hammock with shock cord or
                        > equivalent. Where the short door would be, just have another
                        length
                        > of shock cord. The insulation can be installed and the long door
                        > pulled up through the shock cord on the short side pulled snug. I
                        am
                        > still thinking about how to keep it there, but this would
                        eliminate
                        > velcro and only use minimal fabric and cord. Heck this could even
                        be
                        > made in no time flat.
                        > Any other suggestions
                        > thanks
                        > scott
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn
                        <Ralph.oborn@g...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > How 'bout not actually attaching the bomb bays doors tothe
                        hammock?
                        > > Have real fine rope or twine either in the hammock (under a thin
                        pad
                        > > or over the top of a ridge line to hold the bomb bay doors up?
                        > > Ralph Oborn
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 18:09:25 -0000, Ray Garlington
                        <rgarling@y...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "schrochem"
                        > <schrochem@g...>
                        > > > wrote:
                        > > > file section / bombhatch001.pdf
                        > > >
                        > > > Pretty good idea. One worry about doing this kind of thing
                        is
                        > > > weakening the hammock body fabric by all the needle pricks
                        > through
                        > > > the ripstop nylon; however, you could probably just glue the
                        bomb-
                        > > > bay doors to the hammock bottom since it won't be carrying
                        much
                        > > > weight.
                        > > >
                        > > > Some ideas:
                        > > > Make one short door and one long door. Put 3 or 4 short
                        velcro
                        > > > strips on the short door and matching ones on the long door.
                        > Long
                        > > > door goes over to short door and velcros up. Problem: gap
                        along
                        > > > the side.
                        > > >
                        > > > Same long / short door idea, but glue the long door in
                        position
                        > > > along each long side. Short door provides some adjustment and
                        > > > access to the slot to insert the insulator. Problem: still
                        uses
                        > > > velcro.
                        > > >
                        > > > Glue both doors to the bottom with a central overlaping
                        slit.
                        > Load
                        > > > insulation via the slit. Problem: somewhat restricted access.
                        > could
                        > > > just leave insulation in place and use the equivalent of
                        python
                        > > > skins.
                        > > >
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