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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Pole on HH fly

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  • tjarrell@cox.net
    I like the idea of being able to tie the tieout sides to the fly and eliminate two stakes. Might also help keep the hammock spread when occupied. Tom in Va
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 11, 2005

      no but it is interesting...could you add on to the center line and
      fly it like a kite?  FWIW I never had a lot of problem with even
      wind blown rain. never been in severe wind and I am in trees (not 2
      in a field) so that helps. 

      Coy Boy

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Has anyone tried this?  Looks like a good idea for the smaller
      fly,
      > and possibly even an 8x8.
      >
      > http://www.watertribe.org/Magazine/2001August/JackKrohn.asp




    • Dylan Anderson
      While I do think the pole looks cool, I think it is utterly unneccesary. Tom, I tie my tieouts to the fly all the time without it having a pole. I simply tie
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 11, 2005
        While I do think the pole looks cool, I think it is
        utterly unneccesary. Tom, I tie my tieouts to the fly
        all the time without it having a pole. I simply tie a
        loop in the tieout, then clip it into the little clip
        on the fly because it keeps the ground under the
        hammock less cluttered and allows me to easily unclip
        one side and draw it over to the other side, pulling
        the hammock out of the way when I am sitting below to
        cook or relax out of the rain.

        The reason I say it is unnecessary, and even a slight
        bit of a hinderance is because of a couple of reasons.
        First, it adds weight and bulk to the pack, as well
        more complication. For this it then should have a big
        reward. But the only reward I can see is that it
        would increase the coverage over the ground. However,
        it decreases the coverage of the hammock by raising
        the fly edge. If we are talking about wind blown
        rain, it is how far down, not how far out the fly
        stretches. Hence the reason that tent flys reach down
        to the ground. Also, with the fly rigidly spread and
        held high, it will catch the wind better, but be less
        able to conform, and as such will be more likely to
        pull stakes or tear in a strong gust.

        These are my two cents anyway, and I can think of
        situations where in it could be a benefit, but I don't
        want to bore anyone. Talk to me off list if this is
        something you would like to share, or something you
        would like ask me.

        Though I may die tomorrow, at least I can do it with the knowledge that once I did know true love -unknown


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      • jwj32542
        ... I think the biggest advantage is that you don t NEED any stakes or guylines with this setup. You just tie to the trees and insert the pole...and you re
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 11, 2005
          > Also, with the fly rigidly spread and
          > held high, it will catch the wind better, but be less
          > able to conform, and as such will be more likely to
          > pull stakes or tear in a strong gust.

          I think the biggest advantage is that you don't NEED any stakes or
          guylines with this setup. You just tie to the trees and insert the
          pole...and you're done.

          The downside is that you can't adjust tarp pitch for windy
          conditions. However, you could tighten the hammock closer to the
          tarp at the guy-out points, and if you had a water resistant cover
          (like the taco) that might keep the windblown rain out. Or if you
          had a bigger tarp, like the 8x8, you might get enough coverage just
          by tightening the guy-outs.

          That wouldn't stop any possible tears, though. Using shock-cord to
          attach the hammock guy-out points to the tarp would have somewhat of
          a dampening effect. Using the sling-shot techniqe on the other two
          points would add some. Not sure that would be enough if very strong
          winds, though.

          I wonder why he put the pole on the outside. Any ideas?

          Jeff
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