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Re: Mirage...hammock and quilt length

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  • Jeremy
    Mirage, Definately all good info to have, thanks for your willingness to share. It is greatly appreciated. At this point, I haven t decided if I want to
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 2, 2005
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      Mirage,

      Definately all good info to have, thanks for your willingness to share. It is greatly
      appreciated.

      At this point, I haven't decided if I want to attempt an over/under quilt (i.e. peapod style),
      or a dedicated underquilt (i.e. Canoeblue/Thru-hiker style) with a dedicated top quilt (did I
      mention that I make a killer down quilt?).

      But I must say, after just walking in from a 28*F night, I'm leaning toward the over/under
      style. I had the hammock stuffed into my old Marmot 0*F Never Summer bag, and was
      toasty the whole night (in fact, too warm at some points..if you can believe it). I probably
      would have even been warmer if it had been able to reach beyond my chest and cover my
      shoulders/neck/head, but I used a down jacket under those parts (albeit still inside the
      hammock) and was OK.

      This was also quite possibly the most claustrophobic night I've ever spent in my hammock,
      and something I wanted to ask you about. When my alarm woke me up, I shot awake, and
      was literally reaching for the outside of the hammock. I'm guessing this feeling is
      lessened with the wider dimensions on your quilt, and narrower dimensions of your
      hammock (I used a 60" wide hammock last night)? I've only felt the feeling of
      clasutrophobia once or twice in my life before, so I'm just as apt to blame it on the cold
      I'm trying to recover from as the dimensions of the hammock.

      Otherwise, do you care to speculate whether you'd need to create a longer quilt if you
      went to a hammock that was 6" longer, or do you think that the same quilt dimensions
      would suffice?

      The end of the bag (where it "cinched" around the end of the hammock did create a
      trouble spot for drafts. I was able to stuff my large cotton storage sack that I carry
      everything over to the woods in into the end of the hammock which kinda stopped the
      draft, but I was wondering if you ever had a problem with that, how you stopped it if you
      did, or whether your quilt was better at eliminating drafts at the ends.

      BTW, my previous "low" before speer-style hammocks was 45. That's all I could get out of
      a couple of pads and a sleeping bag inside. Now that I can wrap a sleeping bag around
      the outside, however, I might could push this hammock thing into the teens or single
      didgits with no additional "gear" than I used last night.

      Weight totals: hammock (with all ropes and tree huggers) 10oz
      Sleeping bag: 36oz
      Down jacket: 22oz
      total: 68oz -or- 4.25lbs

      Not bad for just "standard" gear. Can't wait to make some myself to get the weight down
      even more.

      Thanks again,

      -howie

      >
      > Howie,
      >
      > You are correct in your observation, in fact the quilt is shorter
      > than the hammock and when applied, is actually ~4-6" to the inside
      > of each end of the hammock knot/whipping.
      >
      > In practice, since the Hammock body is not perfectly straight (end
      > to end) when hung, it is actually shorter than 8', plus the quilt,
      > having a larger girth than the hammock with me in it and being 14"
      > longer than me, can still accomodate me comfortably.
      >
      > When I get in the hammock, w/out the quilt, the head and feet are
      > very tight and narrow for the first 6-8 inches, so I don't really
      > occupy that part of the hammock anyway. The quilt still fits around
      > me completely w/ no constriction, except, as noted in an earlier
      > message, for the shoulder to hip girth. That's why I am thinking of
      > making making a "wedge" insert. I could make the bags wider, or
      > tapered at either end, more like the peapod I suspect, but I've got
      > 4 bags I've made this way, and want to get them working better.
      >
      > So, short story is yes, you are correct, but i'ts not an issue, for
      > me, based on my experience. It was not an intentional design
      > feature by any means, but it works never-the-less. The drawstring
      > at the ends gets pulled through the grossgrain loops at the corners,
      > and then tied in a slip knot on the hammock rope, just above the
      > whipped end. This keeps it from sliding laterally. I also do not
      > cinch the ends down tightly, just enough to close the gap around the
      > hammock body.
      >
      > Anyway, long post that probably adds more confusion than clarity.
      > Keep asking though. I don't mind the questions and by no means
      > claim to have the end-all, be-all solution, just one step in a
      > progressive iteration that works for me right now. Besides, I love
      > the creative process of design and experimentation. No offense will
      > be taken to any questions asked in sincere curiostiy.
      >
      > Shane "Mirage"...
    • Ray Garlington
      ... I just pull out about 2 to 3 inches at the hemmed ... I put a drawing in the photo section that might help: http://tinyurl.com/46ctw
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 2, 2005
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, woody woodrich
        <fatherrules@y...> wrote:
        > Ray, what do you mean when you say you 'pull out'
        > facric before whipping? Thanks, Woody in DC
        > --- Ray Garlington <rgarling@y...> wrote:
        >
        I just pull out about 2 to 3 inches at the hemmed
        > end before
        > whipping. That allows the edge of the hammock to
        > pull taught when
        > occupied.

        I put a drawing in the photo section that might help:

        http://tinyurl.com/46ctw
      • zippydooda
        Right before you whip (or tie, or sheet bend), if you pull the edges of the material about 2 or 3 inches on each end, then the fabric at the edge is shorter
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 2, 2005
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          Right before you whip (or tie, or sheet bend), if you pull the edges
          of the material about 2 or 3 inches on each end, then the fabric at
          the edge is shorter than the fabric in the middle, which cuts down on
          floppy edges. Making sense?

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
          <rgarling@y...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, woody woodrich
          > <fatherrules@y...> wrote:
          > > Ray, what do you mean when you say you 'pull out'
          > > facric before whipping? Thanks, Woody in DC
          > > --- Ray Garlington <rgarling@y...> wrote:
          > >
          > I just pull out about 2 to 3 inches at the hemmed
          > > end before
          > > whipping. That allows the edge of the hammock to
          > > pull taught when
          > > occupied.
          >
          > I put a drawing in the photo section that might help:
          >
          > http://tinyurl.com/46ctw
        • Mirage
          ... over/under quilt (i.e. peapod style), ... dedicated top quilt (did I ... I had guessed that you were Howie of Hungry Howie fame ;) I actually built the
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 2, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeremy" <jeremy@j...> wrote:

            > At this point, I haven't decided if I want to attempt an
            over/under quilt (i.e. peapod style),
            > or a dedicated underquilt (i.e. Canoeblue/Thru-hiker style) with a
            dedicated top quilt (did I
            > mention that I make a killer down quilt?).

            I had guessed that you were Howie of "Hungry Howie" fame ;)

            I actually built the canoeblue underquilt from the plans on thru-
            hiker first, but just couldn't leave well enough alone, and wanted
            an item more versitle (use it on the ground as a bag when trees
            aren't available or local regulations require shelter use or temps
            drop too low). So I kept experimenting and here we are today. This
            is fun stuff, even if it never "ends" ;)

            > This was also quite possibly the most claustrophobic night I've
            ever spent in my hammock,
            > and something I wanted to ask you about. When my alarm woke me
            up, I shot awake, and
            > was literally reaching for the outside of the hammock. I'm
            guessing this feeling is
            > lessened with the wider dimensions on your quilt, and narrower
            dimensions of your
            > hammock (I used a 60" wide hammock last night)? I've only felt
            the feeling of
            > clasutrophobia once or twice in my life before, so I'm just as apt
            to blame it on the cold
            > I'm trying to recover from as the dimensions of the hammock.

            I've not felt that, but with the velcor slit being on the top, just
            stretching in the morning wil readily crack open the quilt. I
            actually often sleep with it open about 1/3 of the way anyway,
            except on really cold nights.

            Bear in mind too, I live in a pretty temperate area (PNW) and don't
            get out in the hills much during the winter months.

            >
            > Otherwise, do you care to speculate whether you'd need to create a
            longer quilt if you
            > went to a hammock that was 6" longer, or do you think that the
            same quilt dimensions
            > would suffice?

            Excelent point. My current 8' hammock was not my first. I don't
            have the measurements from my original speer hammock, but it was
            made from the instructions in his book, so we can probably figure it
            out.

            Also note that this quilt does rig well under my Hennessy Asym
            Backpacker. You do still need a top quilt, and I was trying to
            avoid that, so I have moved to the speer style and it's various
            derivatives (ala Risk and others).

            >
            > The end of the bag (where it "cinched" around the end of the
            hammock did create a
            > trouble spot for drafts. I was able to stuff my large cotton
            storage sack that I carry
            > everything over to the woods in into the end of the hammock which
            kinda stopped the
            > draft, but I was wondering if you ever had a problem with that,
            how you stopped it if you
            > did, or whether your quilt was better at eliminating drafts at the
            ends.

            Yes, I have noticed this before, and like you, stuffed extra clothes
            down there (Frog Toggs in my case). It's only happened once or
            twice when it got really cold. Otherwise, it actually helps with
            ventilation a wee bit.

            Shane "Mirage"...
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