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Re: hammock through sleeping bag - bugnet

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  • Debra Weisenstein
    I posted some pictures a while ago (this newsgroup, DebW s Photos) of a bug shirt bugnet that works perfectly with such a setup. The sleeping bag pulls up
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
      I posted some pictures a while ago (this newsgroup, DebW's Photos) of a
      "bug shirt" bugnet that works perfectly with such a setup. The sleeping
      bag pulls up from the foot end and the bug shirt pulls down from the
      head end. The one problem I've had with a hammock through sleeping
      bag approach is that my shoulders get cold since they are at the edge of
      the sleeping bag. A torso-sized piece of foam solved that problem, but
      I'd prefer having insulation below the hammock under shoulders and
      head.

      DebW

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > hmm....posted a reply over an hour ago. Anyways, Your hamemade
      bag
      > sounds great. The peapod is basically the same thing. Medicanman
      > uses a WM Ponderosa like this as well. I haven't seen how they deal
      > with skeeters in milder weather though. That is what I'm wanting to
      > find out. I have 3 candidates for surgery. 2 are down bags that are
      > fairly roomy one a 0 F and one a 30 F but one is 1/2 zip and the
      > other 3/4 so I'll have to cut a place in the foot end. also the hood
      > is basically usless so I think it just needs cut off. I have a
      > synthetic 20 F which is very roomy, and has a zipper at the foot end
      > but bug netting in the way. soon as I can (after I finish testing it
      > for BGT) I'm gona modify this one.
      >
      > Coy Boy
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, gerzson <gerzson@g...>
      wrote:
      > > Hello,
      > >
      > > I have been watching this list for a year now and have used many
      good
      > > ideas from here. I think it's time now so share some of mine.
      > >
      > > I like simplicity. I see that many of you come up with very
      > > complicated plans to insulate the bottom part. All my (home-made)
      > > sleeping bags have a double key zipper (opening also from the foot
      > > end). But most of the commercial bags also have this feature. So the
      > > idea is to put the hammock through the sleeping bag (entering at the
      > > head end and going out in a small opening at the foot. This way the
      > > bag remain inflated (insulating) around you. I've been using this
      > > method for about 11 months and it's working.
      > > The hammock must be put through the bag before tying it's last end
      > of course.
      > > After it's all set up just slide the bag to the foot end of the
      > > hammock, get in and pull the bag around you (and your hammock).
      > >
      > > No more pads (sliding from under you), no more expensive sleeping
      bags
      > > especially bought for hammock camping, less to carry. I just carry the
      > > hammock, the sleeping bag and the tarp.
      > >
      > > This is working well with the Spear type hamock which I am using. Not
      > > sure about the Hennessy or other commercial models.
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > >
      > > gerzson
    • Ralph Oborn
      Hey the pictures came through on Gmail? I like the idea, In winter you could stack (nest) a second heavier bag oudside, Ralph
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
        Hey the pictures came through on Gmail?

        I like the idea, In winter you could stack (nest) a second heavier bag oudside,

        Ralph
      • Mirage
        Just to add confirmation (as if it was needed) that this works, I use this technique on my two boys hammocks. When we camp out (I made them specially sized
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
          Just to add confirmation (as if it was needed) that this works, I
          use this technique on my two boys hammocks. When we camp out (I
          made them specially sized hammocks) I use thier smaller, kid sized
          mummy bags with the hammock pulled through a small hole in the foot
          (opend with one end of the double zipper).

          Problems encountered:

          1. Air gaps at the shoulders and head.
          2. Bag "sliding" down towards the foot, exacerbating the air gap
          problem.

          Solutions:

          1. Short legnths of line (4' max) used to tie a wad of the mummy
          hood (put a small rock in the wad if you have problems with the knot
          slipping off) and tie the other end to the hammock rope/strap with a
          slip knot or larks head, pull until there the tension draws the bag
          up to thier back side and shoulders. The also use hooded
          sweatshirts to keep thier heads warm.

          2. Do the same thing at the feet (line tied to wad of the foot end
          and to the hammock line).

          These workarounds keep the bag in position all night and eliminates
          the typical drafts.

          It does complicate egress and entry, until you remember you still
          have a zipper on the bag! Imangine my frustration at 2am, trying to
          extricate one son in a hurry so he can go pee. Untying and retying
          knots under those conditions can send a guy to into anger management
          treatment. Now I know to use the zipper first.

          When bugs are an issue, I use a bug net system of my own design:
          http://tinyurl.com/6a24d

          Shane "Mirage"...
        • Dave Bellinski
          Mirage, With your through sleeping bag, have you experienced any problems with compressing the bottom insulation, and developing cold spots? Light ning _____
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005

            Mirage,

             

            With your through sleeping bag, have you experienced any problems with compressing the bottom insulation, and developing cold spots?

             

            Light'ning


            From: Mirage [mailto:mirage@...]
            Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 2:09 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammock through sleeping bag

             


            Just to add confirmation (as if it was needed) that this works, I
            use this technique on my two boys hammocks.  When we camp out (I
            made them specially sized hammocks) I use thier smaller, kid sized
            mummy bags with the hammock pulled through a small hole in the foot
            (opend with one end of the double zipper).

            Problems encountered:

            1. Air gaps at the shoulders and head.
            2. Bag "sliding" down towards the foot, exacerbating the air gap
            problem.

            Solutions:

            1. Short legnths of line (4' max) used to tie a wad of the mummy
            hood (put a small rock in the wad if you have problems with the knot
            slipping off) and tie the other end to the hammock rope/strap with a
            slip knot or larks head, pull until there the tension draws the bag
            up to thier back side and shoulders.  The also use hooded
            sweatshirts to keep thier heads warm.

            2. Do the same thing at the feet (line tied to wad of the foot end
            and to the hammock line). 

            These workarounds keep the bag in position all night and eliminates
            the typical drafts.

            It does complicate egress and entry, until you remember you still
            have a zipper on the bag!  Imangine my frustration at 2am, trying to
            extricate one son in a hurry so he can go pee.  Untying and retying
            knots under those conditions can send a guy to into anger management
            treatment.  Now I know to use the zipper first.

            When bugs are an issue, I use a bug net system of my own design:
            http://tinyurl.com/6a24d

            Shane "Mirage"...





          • Mirage
            ... with ... Well, since it s my boys in there, I can t speak from personal experience, but I always ask them if they had any cold spot, and usually check on
            Message 5 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Dave Bellinski
              <dave.bellinski@o...> wrote:
              > Mirage,
              >
              > With your through sleeping bag, have you experienced any problems
              with
              > compressing the bottom insulation, and developing cold spots?
              >

              Well, since it's my boys in there, I can't speak from personal
              experience, but I always ask them if they had any cold spot, and
              usually check on them once during the night, and never had a
              complaint since I implimented the "fixes".

              The deal with tying off the foot and head of the bag to the hammock
              works because I CAN adjust the tension along the line of the hammock
              so that it is not being pulled too tight, nor producing sagging
              areas the allow for drafts.

              Bear in mind that the bags have lots of girth space still remaining
              in proportion to my boys. The times I have personally experienced
              compression causing cold spots was when the bag girth was
              insuficient for my body size when sleeping diagonal or on my side.
              It's this lateral "pulling" on the bag that causes ME the most cold
              spots, which means the bag doesn't have the necessary girth for use
              in a hammock. It may work fine on the ground, but in the hammock I
              find a little extra girth is needed for the way I sleep.

              YMMV,

              Shane "Mirage"...
            • Jeremy
              Mirage, You and Rick both continually amaze me with your creative designs. Do you still use a quilt in the hammock, or does your green underquilt work as your
              Message 6 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
                Mirage,
                You and Rick both continually amaze me with your creative designs.


                Do you still use a quilt in the hammock, or does your green underquilt work as your only
                insulation?

                How "low" can you go with that underquilt?


                Thanks!
                -howie
              • Mirage
                ... underquilt work as your only ... I have been down to ~28F with no additional bags or quilts, but I was wearing polypro lonjohns, smartwool socks, fleece
                Message 7 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeremy" <jeremy@j...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Mirage,
                  > You and Rick both continually amaze me with your creative designs.
                  >
                  >
                  > Do you still use a quilt in the hammock, or does your green
                  underquilt work as your only
                  > insulation?
                  >
                  > How "low" can you go with that underquilt?
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  > -howie

                  I have been down to ~28F with no additional bags or quilts, but I
                  was wearing polypro lonjohns, smartwool socks, fleece pants, a micro
                  fleece balaclava and a Kennebec pullover (ala thru-hiker.com) ontop
                  of my torso (not wearing it, just laid on top). Not cold, and maybe
                  a bit warm until early morning, then I was just perfect.

                  Usually though, in polypro lonjohns, socks and a balaclava, with the
                  Kennebec on top, I'm good down to around 32-35F. My Kennebec
                  basically serves as a torso blanket on top of me.

                  I'm about to start on a new addition to the over/under quilt that
                  for lack of a better name I call the wedge. As I noted in an
                  earlier post, the quilts I have made to date were a bit tight on the
                  girth, mostly due to construction from an unseamed lenght of
                  ripstop, usually 56-60" wide. The "wedge" will be kind of a diamond
                  shapped <> mini quilt with hook/loop on it's sides. This will
                  extend the girth just enough to eliminate the "tightness" I've been
                  struggling with.

                  I may try making one the is rectangular, but with the hook/look laid
                  out in the diamond shape, resulting is some double layer overlap on
                  the inside.

                  I don't do alot of cold weather hiking/camping, but a few of my
                  nights in the Oregon Cascades have dipped into the low 30's high
                  20's and I'm not the worse for the wear of it.

                  As always, if it does get to cold, I drop down to the ground with my
                  sitpad (ridgerest cut to 24"x27") and packpack (GG VT) as padding,
                  pitch the tarp low and burry myself in the quilt. Safety over
                  comfort.

                  Shane "Mirage"...
                • Jeremy
                  Very cool! Thanks for the info. btw, what are the approximate dimensions of your quilt? loft? It s just a rectangle with the ends drawn up, right? And what
                  Message 8 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
                    Very cool! Thanks for the info.

                    btw, what are the approximate dimensions of your quilt? loft?

                    It's just a rectangle with the ends drawn up, right?

                    And what does it weigh?

                    If you can't tell, I'm considering making my own Mirage system :-)

                    Thanks!
                    -howie

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeremy" <jeremy@j...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Mirage,
                    > > You and Rick both continually amaze me with your creative designs.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Do you still use a quilt in the hammock, or does your green
                    > underquilt work as your only
                    > > insulation?
                    > >
                    > > How "low" can you go with that underquilt?
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thanks!
                    > > -howie
                    >
                    > I have been down to ~28F with no additional bags or quilts, but I
                    > was wearing polypro lonjohns, smartwool socks, fleece pants, a micro
                    > fleece balaclava and a Kennebec pullover (ala thru-hiker.com) ontop
                    > of my torso (not wearing it, just laid on top). Not cold, and maybe
                    > a bit warm until early morning, then I was just perfect.
                    >
                    > Usually though, in polypro lonjohns, socks and a balaclava, with the
                    > Kennebec on top, I'm good down to around 32-35F. My Kennebec
                    > basically serves as a torso blanket on top of me.
                    >
                    > I'm about to start on a new addition to the over/under quilt that
                    > for lack of a better name I call the wedge. As I noted in an
                    > earlier post, the quilts I have made to date were a bit tight on the
                    > girth, mostly due to construction from an unseamed lenght of
                    > ripstop, usually 56-60" wide. The "wedge" will be kind of a diamond
                    > shapped <> mini quilt with hook/loop on it's sides. This will
                    > extend the girth just enough to eliminate the "tightness" I've been
                    > struggling with.
                    >
                    > I may try making one the is rectangular, but with the hook/look laid
                    > out in the diamond shape, resulting is some double layer overlap on
                    > the inside.
                    >
                    > I don't do alot of cold weather hiking/camping, but a few of my
                    > nights in the Oregon Cascades have dipped into the low 30's high
                    > 20's and I'm not the worse for the wear of it.
                    >
                    > As always, if it does get to cold, I drop down to the ground with my
                    > sitpad (ridgerest cut to 24"x27") and packpack (GG VT) as padding,
                    > pitch the tarp low and burry myself in the quilt. Safety over
                    > comfort.
                    >
                    > Shane "Mirage"...
                  • Mirage
                    ... My pleasure. The whole thing can be seen in the image sequence here: http://www.peak.org/~webdawg/Hammocking/MirageHammockSystem ... It s finished
                    Message 9 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeremy" <jeremy@j...> wrote:
                      >

                      > Very cool! Thanks for the info.
                      >

                      My pleasure. The whole thing can be seen in the image sequence
                      here: http://www.peak.org/~webdawg/Hammocking/MirageHammockSystem

                      > btw, what are the approximate dimensions of your quilt? loft?
                      >

                      It's finished dimensions are 7'x4.5' (84"x54")

                      > It's just a rectangle with the ends drawn up, right?
                      >

                      Hook on one long edge, loop on the other, drawcord at each end
                      (center pull), and Gross Grain loops at all 4 corners, 3 more on
                      each long side and one centered at the foot and head ends.

                      I use the loops with mitten hooks for a variety of configurations,
                      including under my Hennessy.

                      > And what does it weigh?
                      >

                      My Primaloft ones are 44oz finished, the down one is 33oz.

                      > If you can't tell, I'm considering making my own Mirage system :-)
                      >

                      I finally put my instructions on the web.

                      <DISCLAIMER>
                      These instructions include no pics (yet) and have not been tested
                      without me being present to make up for any deficiencies in them.
                      I've only shared them with one other person and have no feed back
                      yet on thier readability or how easy they are to follow and produce
                      a working quilt.

                      Use at your own risk, but if you use them, please send me edits or
                      corrections (or praise, that always feels good ;)

                      Please do not reproduce or redistribute them w/out approriate credit.
                      </DISCLAIMER>

                      Ok, so here ya go:

                      http://www.peak.org/~webdawg/DIYGear/Under-Over-
                      Quilt/Primaloft_Quilt_instructions.html

                      OR

                      http://tinyurl.com/45fz9
                    • wootres4
                      gerzson, You beat me to the punch. My eagles nest outfitters doublenest setup comes as hammock, bug net, and rain fly separately. The idea of slipping the
                      Message 10 of 21 , Feb 25, 2005
                        gerzson,

                        You beat me to the punch. My eagles nest outfitters doublenest
                        setup comes as hammock, bug net, and rain fly separately. The idea
                        of slipping the sleeping bag around the hammock was something I was
                        going to try this spring when the mercury rose a little higher.
                        The hanging bug net solves the issue of annoying critters so flesh
                        exposure isn't an issue in summer time either.

                        I am curious; this forum seems to surround the Hennessey type set up
                        with the hammock/net integrated design. Does my set up have
                        problems on the trail? I can find very few reviews on the
                        doublenest and it is not discussed in this forum that I can find.

                        CHRIS


                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, gerzson <gerzson@g...> wrote:
                        > Hello,
                        >
                        > I have been watching this list for a year now and have used many
                        good
                        > ideas from here. I think it's time now so share some of mine.
                        >
                        > I like simplicity. I see that many of you come up with very
                        > complicated plans to insulate the bottom part. All my (home-made)
                        > sleeping bags have a double key zipper (opening also from the foot
                        > end). But most of the commercial bags also have this feature. So
                        the
                        > idea is to put the hammock through the sleeping bag (entering at
                        the
                        > head end and going out in a small opening at the foot. This way the
                        > bag remain inflated (insulating) around you. I've been using this
                        > method for about 11 months and it's working.
                        > The hammock must be put through the bag before tying it's last end
                        of course.
                        > After it's all set up just slide the bag to the foot end of the
                        > hammock, get in and pull the bag around you (and your hammock).
                        >
                        > No more pads (sliding from under you), no more expensive sleeping
                        bags
                        > especially bought for hammock camping, less to carry. I just carry
                        the
                        > hammock, the sleeping bag and the tarp.
                        >
                        > This is working well with the Spear type hamock which I am using.
                        Not
                        > sure about the Hennessy or other commercial models.
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        >
                        > gerzson
                      • Mirage
                        ... Quilt/Primaloft_Quilt_instructions.html ... I realized that my instructions did not have a Materials or cut list. I have updated the instructions with that
                        Message 11 of 21 , Feb 28, 2005
                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I finally put my instructions on the web.
                          >
                          > Ok, so here ya go:
                          >
                          > http://www.peak.org/~webdawg/DIYGear/Under-Over-
                          Quilt/Primaloft_Quilt_instructions.html
                          >
                          > OR
                          >
                          > http://tinyurl.com/45fz9

                          I realized that my instructions did not have a Materials or cut list.

                          I have updated the instructions with that info, and the cost
                          estimates as well.

                          Eventually, I'll get some pictures in there too.

                          Shane "Mirage"...
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