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Risk: condensation in TravelPod?

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  • jwj32542
    Risk (and anyone else with a TravelPod), I haven t experience this yet, but I m wondering about excess condensation in the TravelPod. Here s my thought
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 15, 2005
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      Risk (and anyone else with a TravelPod),

      I haven't experience this yet, but I'm wondering about excess
      condensation in the TravelPod. Here's my thought process:

      1 - Condensation occurs when moisture evaporates, then contacts a
      cooler surface.
      2 - If the TravelPod is suspended on a ridgeline as in your plan,
      this would create an air space between the top quilt and inner
      surface of the TravelPod.
      3 - This air space would allow the surface of the TravelPod to be
      quite cooler than the moist air leaving the quilt, so wouldn't this
      moisture then condense on the inside of the TravelPod?

      I haven't used a ridgeline on my TravelPod yet. As I was deciding
      whether or not to use one, this condensation issue crossed my mind.
      However, I noticed in one of your pictures that the Pod is sitting
      right on top of the quilt. Do you only tighten the ridgeline when
      you unzip the Pod?

      Jeff
    • Rick
      ... Hi Jeff, I don t now use a ridge line inside the TravelPod. If I have written that I do, please let me know where and I will correct it. It is meant to
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 15, 2005
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        jwj32542 wrote:

        >Risk (and anyone else with a TravelPod),
        >
        >I haven't experience this yet, but I'm wondering about excess
        >condensation in the TravelPod. Here's my thought process:
        >
        >1 - Condensation occurs when moisture evaporates, then contacts a
        >cooler surface.
        >2 - If the TravelPod is suspended on a ridgeline as in your plan,
        >this would create an air space between the top quilt and inner
        >surface of the TravelPod.
        >3 - This air space would allow the surface of the TravelPod to be
        >quite cooler than the moist air leaving the quilt, so wouldn't this
        >moisture then condense on the inside of the TravelPod?
        >
        >I haven't used a ridgeline on my TravelPod yet. As I was deciding
        >whether or not to use one, this condensation issue crossed my mind.
        >However, I noticed in one of your pictures that the Pod is sitting
        >right on top of the quilt. Do you only tighten the ridgeline when
        >you unzip the Pod?
        >
        >Jeff
        >
        >
        >
        Hi Jeff,

        I don't now use a ridge line inside the TravelPod. If I have written
        that I do, please let me know where and I will correct it. It is meant
        to hang with an air space under the hammock, not to give an air space
        above. There is some condensation above my head when it is cold enough
        to close over my head. This is from my breath. In very cold
        temperatures, this is frost. In more moderate temps (above 15 or so) it
        creates moisture that wets the cloth instead of drops inside. That
        moist cloth is always drying as it is wetter than the outside air and
        warmer too. This is the reason I would not make a TravelPod out of
        silnylon. It would collect moisture inside.

        Risk
      • jwj32542
        ... written ... Here s the section I was referring to. I see now it s not actually a ridgeline, but it s close. Coming out the ends of the Travel pod on each
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 16, 2005
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
          > I don't now use a ridge line inside the TravelPod. If I have
          written
          > that I do, please let me know where and I will correct it.

          Here's the section I was referring to. I see now it's not actually
          a ridgeline, but it's close.

          "Coming out the ends of the Travel pod on each end are two
          suspension cords. These are threaded through two tunnels that are
          four feet long and parallel to, a foot away from the zipper. The
          tunnel is in the central four feet of the TravelPod. They are tied
          at each end and a larger cord is used to draw tension on the strings
          and tie it off to a tab on the suspension webbing of the hammock."

          > It is meant
          > to hang with an air space under the hammock, not to give an air
          space
          > above.

          That's the way mine is now...I guess I just misunderstood your
          original design. Mine just lays on the hammock's top and hangs
          below it, with a small opening at the foot end and a drawstring
          cinched about the head end. I was thinking about adding the
          ridgeline to keep the right amount of sag in the hammock, which
          would also keep the TravelPod elevated, creating the air pocket I
          described earlier. Maybe I'll experiment and see what I can come up
          with.

          Thanks for the help!

          Jeff
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