Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: My third night in my Hennessy

Expand Messages
  • john hill
    Right about the bladder and right about keeping a pad in place too. I ve looked at the underquilt but they re just not in my budget yet. Maybe next year.
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 5, 2005
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Right about the bladder and right about keeping a pad in place too.  I've looked at the underquilt but they're just not in my budget yet.  Maybe next year.  Anyway, I'm sold on hammock camping.  Haven't had a rainy night yet though but from what I've read it shouldn't be too much trouble.

      jack_tier <jacktier@...> wrote:

      Multiple trips to pee are a sign that your bladder is cool and
      uncomfortable....notice that the warmest night you had the fewest
      number of trips....pads are a bummer to keep positioned....If you
      want warmth and hassle free comfort look at an underquilt...To be
      upfront, I'm an owner, but www.jacksrbetter.com has a good answer.
      Be sure to check the articles on the site, as there are a lot of
      useful tips for hanging comfortable the year round, no matter how
      you decide.


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John F. Hill" <nil_dog@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Well, I've been working long hours the last couple of weeks so I
      > haven't read my e-mail for a while.  Had 230 messages from this
      > group to go through when I opened up tonight.  Looks like a lot of
      > folks are trying the same thing.  Here is a tale of my first three
      > nights in my Hennessy.
      >
      > I spent my third night in my new Hennessy Expedition A-Sym
      Saturday
      > night the 24th of January at Bucks Pocket State Park in Alabama on
      a
      > scout trip.  We take this trip every year to maybe get the troops
      a
      > polar bear award for sleeping in a tent or under the stars in
      below
      > 19 degree temperatures.
      >
      > My first night in my hammock was in the back yard during the
      > Christmas holidays figuring that if things got too bad I could
      just
      > head back inside.  The temperature that night went to about 45
      > degrees.  I had been reading posts here and information elsewhere
      on
      > cold weather hammocking so I tried to use my fleece sleeping bag
      as
      > an insulator.  I wore mid-weights that are supposed to be
      comparable
      > to Patagonia, heavy socks, and a toboggan (Thinsulate) (wool
      cap). 
      > I used my Slumberjack 30 degree Thermolite mummy bag (backpacking
      > bag � 2.5 pounds total weight) as a blanket but stuffing my legs
      > down inside.  I pulled the tarp edges down some to block out most
      of
      > the wind.  I slept pretty warm and did pretty good except having
      to
      > make 4 trips to the head during the night.  It was a job keeping
      the
      > fleece bag positioned but I did manage.
      >
      > The next night only went to about 55 degrees but I dressed the
      same
      > as before.  This time I thought I'd try to use my blue foam
      sleeping
      > pad as a form for the fleece bag so maybe it'd stay in place which
      > it did to a point.  Since it was warmer I uncovered a bit but
      still
      > did well.  Only had to make one trip to the head at 4:00 a.m. and
      my
      > wife was sitting up reading since she'd woken up and was trying to
      > get drowsy again so I just stayed inside this time.
      >
      > Now for this last night � at Bucks Pocket.  The weather forecast
      was
      > for a low of 25 degrees Saturday night so I thought I'd try again
      > but I also set up my little 7x7 dome tent just in case.  Along
      about
      > 6:00 p.m. the temperature was already in the upper 20s/lower 30s
      so
      > it looked like the weather folks blew another one.  I slept in my
      > not_Patagonias again, my scout pants, an acrylic sweater, a nylon
      > pullover jacket (the kind that stuffs in its own pocket � from Old
      > Navy), polypropylene liner socks, Boy Scout hiking socks, and my
      > (Thinsulate) toboggan.  I used my blue pad stuffed inside my
      fleece
      > bag and my 30 degree bag again.  This time I pulled the tarp way
      > down on the sides.  This night I made 4 trips to the head again. 
      I
      > started out being warm as toast.  On the second trip to the head
      my
      > toes had started getting a little chilly so when I got back I put
      on
      > another pair of hiking socks and a pair of flannel or fleece
      > sleeping pants.  On my third trip I checked my thermometer and it
      > was about 16 degrees (boy did the weather folks blow this one) and
      > my toes were getting chilly again.  I took a Stearns fishing rain
      > jacket with a quilted lining I'd carried against the weather
      > prediction of some rain, buttoned the front and put my feet back
      in
      > my sleeping bag and then inside the jacket.  Warm again.  Along
      > about 6:00 a.m. another trip to the head was needed and my toes
      were
      > chilly again.  I was too, starting to shiver � could of used maybe
      a
      > 20 degree bag or under my fleece bag instead of using it under
      me. 
      > When I came back to the site some of the kids were stirring and so
      > was one of the other adults so I just put my boots on and called
      it
      > a night, stirred up a fire, and started the coffee.  The
      temperature
      > was at 13 degrees by now.  I was kinda glad it was time to get up
      > because I'd run out of things to put on.  During the night the
      wind
      > was pretty active � 3 or 4 times it got my hammock rocking.  I had
      a
      > 32 ounce Gatorade bottle for head calls but couldn't figure out
      how
      > to use it without getting half out of the hammock anyway so
      decided
      > against it and just used the trips to the bathhouse to rearrange
      my
      > pad and stuff.  Maybe in the summer.  Since then I realized I
      could
      > use a WalMart bag or a garbage bag to wrap my feet in for a few
      more
      > degrees.  The wind really got up during the night too, about 4
      times
      > it got my hammock swinging.  You could hear it coming.
      >
      > From this I learned that trying to keep a blue pad that's 20
      inches
      > wide under you when sleeping on your side is a real challenge and
      > I'm going to have to do like others have said and make a wider
      one. 
      > I'll have to add to the side at the upper end and trim to fit the
      > hammock's shape but I'll need it at the feet as mine get cold (old
      > legs = poor circulation?).  Maybe use a space blanket that's
      trimmed
      > to fit (or just fold it up to fit).  Then if it's way cold I can
      use
      > my fleece bag as a cover over my sleeping bag.  One day I might be
      > able to get a good down quilt that would be rated below 20 degrees
      > or so and use that in extreme weather.  I'm getting on in life,
      > overweight, and way out of shape so carry weight is real important
      > to me.  The outcome of this might have been entirely different
      also
      > if the night was a damp or wet cold but I think it was a pretty
      dry
      > cold � maybe because of the wind - and therefore not as "cold". 
      > After this trip I'll probably use my hammock on all our outings
      > where there are trees unless really cold weather is predicted.
      >
      > I didn't notice any condensation and from reading all the other
      > posts it might be that I didn't because of my fleece bag or my
      > not_patagonias.  Anyway, I'm into hammocking now.  I might buy a
      > Byer cheapo for winter camping when you don't need a bug net and
      use
      > my Hennessy for bug weather although I'm sure the bug netting
      helped
      > keep it warmer inside.  So many options.
      >
      > john




      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'
    • jwj32542
      ... yet. The materials only cost about $65-75 for a Primaloft one and it s pretty simple to sew. Just a few straight stitches, really. I haven t tried to make
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 6, 2005
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, john hill <nil_dog@y...>
        wrote:
        > I've looked at the underquilt but they're just not in my budget
        yet.

        The materials only cost about $65-75 for a Primaloft one and it's
        pretty simple to sew. Just a few straight stitches, really.

        I haven't tried to make a down one, though...I guess that's more
        complicated. Probably won't try since I have the JRB set...highly
        recommended if you can fit it into the budget sometime.

        Jeff
      • Ralph Oborn
        When I grt a moment, I m gonna try hanging an old (coleman) sleeping bag under my HH. I ll support it with an old mesh string hammock. Ralph
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 6, 2005
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          When I grt a moment, I'm gonna try hanging an old (coleman) sleeping
          bag under my HH. I'll support it with an old mesh string hammock.

          Ralph


          On Sat, 5 Feb 2005 17:10:27 -0800 (PST), john hill <nil_dog@...> wrote:
          > Right about the bladder and right about keeping a pad in place too. I've
          > looked at the underquilt but they're just not in my budget yet. Maybe next
          > year. Anyway, I'm sold on hammock camping. Haven't had a rainy night yet
          > though but from what I've read it shouldn't be too much trouble.
          >
          >
          > jack_tier <jacktier@...> wrote:
          >
          > Multiple trips to pee are a sign that your bladder is cool and
          > uncomfortable....notice that the warmest night you had the fewest
          > number of trips....pads are a bummer to keep positioned....If you
          > want warmth and hassle free comfort look at an underquilt...To be
          > upfront, I'm an owner, but www.jacksrbetter.com has a good answer.
          > Be sure to check the articles on the site, as there are a lot of
          > useful tips for hanging comfortable the year round, no matter how
          > you decide.
          >
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John F. Hill" <nil_dog@y...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Well, I've been working long hours the last couple of weeks so I
          > > haven't read my e-mail for a while. Had 230 messages from this
          > > group to go through when I opened up tonight. Looks like a lot of
          > > folks are trying the same thing. Here is a tale of my first three
          > > nights in my Hennessy.
          > >
          > > I spent my third night in my new Hennessy Expedition A-Sym
          > Saturday
          > > night the 24th of January at Bucks Pocket State Park in Alabama on
          > a
          > > scout trip. We take this trip every year to maybe get the troops
          > a
          > > polar bear award for sleeping in a tent or under the stars in
          > below
          > > 19 degree temperatures.
          > >
          > > My first night in my hammock was in the back yard during the
          > > Christmas holidays figuring that if things got too bad I could
          > just
          > > head back inside. The temperature that night went to about 45
          > > degrees. I had been reading posts here and information elsewhere
          > on
          > > cold weather hammocking so I tried to use my fleece sleeping bag
          > as
          > > an insulator. I wore mid-weights that are supposed to be
          > comparable
          > > to Patagonia, heavy socks, and a toboggan (Thinsulate) (wool
          > cap).
          > > I used my Slumberjack 30 degree Thermolite mummy bag (backpacking
          > > bag – 2.5 pounds total weight) as a blanket but stuffing my legs
          > > down inside. I pulled the tarp edges down some to block out most
          > of
          > > the wind. I slept pretty warm and did pretty good except having
          > to
          > > make 4 trips to the head during the night. It was a job keeping
          > the
          > > fleece bag positioned but I did manage.
          > >
          > > The next night only went to about 55 degrees but I dressed the
          > same
          > > as before. This time I thought I'd try to use my blue foam
          > sleeping
          > > pad as a form for the fleece bag so maybe it'd stay in place which
          > > it did to a point. Since it was warmer I uncovered a bit but
          > still
          > > did well. Only had to make one trip to the head at 4:00 a.m. and
          > my
          > > wife was sitting up reading since she'd woken up and was trying to
          > > get drowsy again so I just stayed inside this time.
          > >
          > > Now for this last night – at Bucks Pocket. The weather forecast
          > was
          > > for a low of 25 degrees Saturday night so I thought I'd try again
          > > but I also set up my little 7x7 dome tent just in case. Along
          > about
          > > 6:00 p.m. the temperature was already in the upper 20s/lower 30s
          > so
          > > it looked like the weather folks blew another one. I slept in my
          > > not_Patagonias again, my scout pants, an acrylic sweater, a nylon
          > > pullover jacket (the kind that stuffs in its own pocket – from Old
          > > Navy), polypropylene liner socks, Boy Scout hiking socks, and my
          > > (Thinsulate) toboggan. I used my blue pad stuffed inside my
          > fleece
          > > bag and my 30 degree bag again. This time I pulled the tarp way
          > > down on the sides. This night I made 4 trips to the head again.
          > I
          > > started out being warm as toast. On the second trip to the head
          > my
          > > toes had started getting a little chilly so when I got back I put
          > on
          > > another pair of hiking socks and a pair of flannel or fleece
          > > sleeping pants. On my third trip I checked my thermometer and it
          > > was about 16 degrees (boy did the weather folks blow this one) and
          > > my toes were getting chilly again. I took a Stearns fishing rain
          > > jacket with a quilted lining I'd carried against the weather
          > > prediction of some rain, buttoned the front and put my feet back
          > in
          > > my sleeping bag and then inside the jacket. Warm again. Along
          > > about 6:00 a.m. another trip to the head was needed and my toes
          > were
          > > chilly again. I was too, starting to shiver – could of used maybe
          > a
          > > 20 degree bag or under my fleece bag instead of using it under
          > me.
          > > When I came back to the site some of the kids were stirring and so
          > > was one of the other adults so I just put my boots on and called
          > it
          > > a night, stirred up a fire, and started the coffee. The
          > temperature
          > > was at 13 degrees by now. I was kinda glad it was time to get up
          > > because I'd run out of things to put on. During the night the
          > wind
          > > was pretty active – 3 or 4 times it got my hammock rocking. I had
          > a
          > > 32 ounce Gatorade bottle for head calls but couldn't figure out
          > how
          > > to use it without getting half out of the hammock anyway so
          > decided
          > > against it and just used the trips to the bathhouse to rearrange
          > my
          > > pad and stuff. Maybe in the summer. Since then I realized I
          > could
          > > use a WalMart bag or a garbage bag to wrap my feet in for a few
          > more
          > > degrees. The wind really got up during the night too, about 4
          > times
          > > it got my hammock swinging. You could hear it coming.
          > >
          > > From this I learned that trying to keep a blue pad that's 20
          > inches
          > > wide under you when sleeping on your side is a real challenge and
          > > I'm going to have to do like others have said and make a wider
          > one.
          > > I'll have to add to the side at the upper end and trim to fit the
          > > hammock's shape but I'll need it at the feet as mine get cold (old
          > > legs = poor circulation?). Maybe use a space blanket that's
          > trimmed
          > > to fit (or just fold it up to fit). Then if it's way cold I can
          > use
          > > my fleece bag as a cover over my sleeping bag. One day I might be
          > > able to get a good down quilt that would be rated below 20 degrees
          > > or so and use that in extreme weather. I'm getting on in life,
          > > overweight, and way out of shape so carry weight is real important
          > > to me. The outcome of this might have been entirely different
          > also
          > > if the night was a damp or wet cold but I think it was a pretty
          > dry
          > > cold – maybe because of the wind - and therefore not as "cold".
          > > After this trip I'll probably use my hammock on all our outings
          > > where there are trees unless really cold weather is predicted.
          > >
          > > I didn't notice any condensation and from reading all the other
          > > posts it might be that I didn't because of my fleece bag or my
          > > not_patagonias. Anyway, I'm into hammocking now. I might buy a
          > > Byer cheapo for winter camping when you don't need a bug net and
          > use
          > > my Hennessy for bug weather although I'm sure the bug netting
          > helped
          > > keep it warmer inside. So many options.
          > >
          > > john
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'
          > ________________________________
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.