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Re: Fwd: Using silk for hammocks

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  • J.D. Hoessle
    ... Silk....? I gathered from the previous Post that there is a weight savings. But, doesn t silk absorb a lot of moisture...? Wouldn t that be a problem in
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
      <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
      > For me, silk for a hammock started out as a very nice
      > material for a summer hammock but it is so nice I
      > don't expect to change to any other material.

      Silk....? I gathered from the previous Post that there is a weight
      savings. But, doesn't silk absorb a lot of moisture...? Wouldn't
      that be a problem in both warm & cold temps; e.g., sweat, breathing,
      etc. ???

      > I am very close to having my first "0" degree system
      > finished. I keep thinking of new things to try. I
      > need to make one more change and then I can finish the
      > first
      > working prototype.

      OK.... A Zero degree system, huh? I will really look forward to
      reading about THAT!

      > I have been working on a fully breathable suspension
      > system for my Titanium/Carbon Fiber External Frame
      > Pack. I discovered a plastic mold-able material used
      > in the medical field

      Too Cool....!!!!

      > My primary Doctor is very
      > interested in how I have adapted this plastic
      > material to a completely new use. I will finish this
      > today and start wearing it as I am able to get back
      > out walking or hiking.

      Good Luck! My best wishes for a speedy return to the trail!

      Happy Trails,

      J.D.
    • Ray Garlington
      ... good to hear from you Bill. I am using about 1/3 of the feathers from a wwII, army mummy bag. After I transferred the feathers from my old silnylon bag
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2005
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
        <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
        > The Down proof-ness of the silk: I used 800+ Down and
        > have very few feathers. I based my comments about the
        > silk as a baffle material upon the number of feathers
        > that get out of my new WM Down Sleeping Bag. I have
        > treated my silk baffles pretty harsh at times and
        > haven't had a problem losing enough Down to worry
        > about it. My Down baffles are also inside a sleeve
        > and this may help in the "Down Proof" ness of how I
        > use it. This really gives me two layers of material.
        > What kind of Down are you using?

        good to hear from you Bill. I am using about 1/3 of the feathers
        from a wwII, army mummy bag. After I transferred the feathers from
        my old silnylon bag to the silk bag I sewed up the silk bag and
        spread it on the floor. It lofted beautifully, and I said to
        myself, this could make a great quilt for inside the hammock, and I
        climbed under it. As I did, I noticed that some powder pushed
        through the silk, and on closer inspection there were also some
        extremely fine feathers trying to work through. It may not be a
        problem, I just need to try it for a while and see what is going
        on. At this point, I'm certain this pad will work extremely well
        inside the GI shell. It weighs about 12 ounces and should insulate
        well to about 10*F, perhaps lower.

        Best wishes on a speedy recovery.
      • Paul Kaercher
        Hi Ray, What size is your 10-mm silk hammock and what does it weigh? I made one out of 8-mm silk 9 X 54 (before hemming the edges) and it weighs 5 1/4 oz
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2005
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          Hi Ray,
          What size is your 10-mm silk hammock and what does it weigh?
          I made one out of 8-mm silk 9' X 54" (before hemming the edges) and it
          weighs 5 1/4 oz without rope or tree huggers.
          My next hammock may be out of 10-mm silk if the weight difference is not much.


          You said "I noticed that some powder pushed through the silk"
          from the down/feathers you recycled from an old GI bag.

          That fine powder may be frass from Dermestid beetles feasting on the
          feathers. I had to throw out my old Army bags because the dust/frass
          set off my wife's "hay fever" such that she could hardly breath.

          So if you have allergies be aware that those old bags may contain allergins
          that may affect you.
          Just something to keep in mind.

          Paul
        • Ray Garlington
          ... and it ... is not much. The hemmed size of my hammock body is 10 3 x 52 and it weighs 7.4 ounces. I wanted to try a slightly longer one this time having
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 3, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kaercher"
            <yomas_1@h...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Ray,
            > What size is your 10-mm silk hammock and what does it weigh?
            > I made one out of 8-mm silk 9' X 54" (before hemming the edges)
            and it
            > weighs 5 1/4 oz without rope or tree huggers.
            > My next hammock may be out of 10-mm silk if the weight difference
            is not much.

            The hemmed size of my hammock body is 10'3" x 52" and it weighs 7.4
            ounces. I wanted to try a slightly longer one this time having
            experimented with shorter ones for a while.
            >
            >
            > You said "I noticed that some powder pushed through the silk"
            > from the down/feathers you recycled from an old GI bag.
            >
            > That fine powder may be frass from Dermestid beetles feasting on
            the
            > feathers.

            I did not see any signs of insect activity. Perhaps it was just
            crushed feather powder. I will say that it was not pleasant to
            breath this dust. I think I'll take the bag outside and give it a
            good old fashioned 'dusting'.
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