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New User with Newbie Question

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  • Kane Mortlock
    Hi all, I m looking at acquiring my first hammock/shelter. I m reasonably sold on the Hennessey Hammocks. What is the difference between 70D Nylon Oxford and
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 20, 2005
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      Hi all,

      I'm looking at acquiring my first hammock/shelter. I'm reasonably
      sold on the Hennessey Hammocks.

      What is the difference between 70D Nylon Oxford and 210D Nylon
      Oxford? I presume the 210D is a heavier fabric: does anyone have
      experience with the Hennesseys? Is the 70D fabric sturdy enough? To
      do the bivouac setup on the ground often? Is the 210D worth the
      extra weight?

      Any other comments re Hennesseys or Hammocks generally before I buy?

      I'm leaning towards the Hennessey Explorer Ultralite Asym at the
      moment. I'm only 5'10'' and 75kgs (165lbs), but I thought the extra
      room and load capacity could be good for bringing gear inside.

      Any and all help would be appreciated, God willing.

      Thanks,
      Kane Mortlock.
    • Ralph Oborn
      For reviews of everything camping: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/ Risk excellent stuff on hammocks and about anything else, scroll down.
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 20, 2005
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        For reviews of everything camping:
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/

        Risk excellent stuff on hammocks and about anything else, scroll down.
        http://www.imrisk.com/

        Shane for gracefull entrance and exit.
        http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/hiking/sections/gear/shelter/hthh.htm

        For lots of good stuff, (this is his list)
        http://www.speerhammocks.com/


        Welcome to the hanging :]

        Ralph





        On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 00:56:46 -0000, Kane Mortlock <john851@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I'm looking at acquiring my first hammock/shelter. I'm reasonably
        > sold on the Hennessey Hammocks.
        >
        > What is the difference between 70D Nylon Oxford and 210D Nylon
        > Oxford? I presume the 210D is a heavier fabric: does anyone have
        > experience with the Hennesseys? Is the 70D fabric sturdy enough? To
        > do the bivouac setup on the ground often? Is the 210D worth the
        > extra weight?
        >
        > Any other comments re Hennesseys or Hammocks generally before I buy?
        >
        > I'm leaning towards the Hennessey Explorer Ultralite Asym at the
        > moment. I'm only 5'10'' and 75kgs (165lbs), but I thought the extra
        > room and load capacity could be good for bringing gear inside.
        >
        > Any and all help would be appreciated, God willing.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Kane Mortlock.
        >
      • Shane Steinkamp
        ... I m not sure I like the way that sounds... Shane
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 20, 2005
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          > Welcome to the hanging :]

          I'm not sure I like the way that sounds...

          Shane
        • dlfrost_1
          ... A hammock is a poor place for gear stowage--unless hung up everything tumbles down to where you are. I do keep a small bag tied up at the head end of my
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 21, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Kane Mortlock" <john851@d...>
            wrote:
            > I'm looking at acquiring my first hammock/shelter. I'm reasonably
            > sold on the Hennessey Hammocks.

            > I'm leaning towards the Hennessey Explorer Ultralite Asym at the
            > moment. I'm only 5'10'' and 75kgs (165lbs), but I thought the extra
            > room and load capacity could be good for bringing gear inside.

            A hammock is a poor place for gear stowage--unless hung up everything
            tumbles down to where you are. I do keep a small bag tied up at the
            head end of my HH to hold a few items, but everything else is hung up
            outside somewhere. I use trash bags to protect my pack and other
            items. If you camp in rainy locales a lot you might also consider a
            larger tarp than the stock one that Hennessey supplies.

            The benefit of having a longer bed length HH is that you sleep
            flatter. The Explorer is a good choice.

            Doug Frost
          • David Chinell
            Kane: I believe mosquitoes can bite through the 210D fabric. I wish I knew which model I have -- either Expedition or Explorer. I think it s the original
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 21, 2005
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              Kane:

              I believe mosquitoes can bite through the 210D fabric. I
              wish I knew which model I have -- either Expedition or
              Explorer. I think it's the "original" model. Anyway, I paid
              the awful price one night. I couldn't believe they were
              actually getting me, but they were.

              The lighter but more densely woven models like the
              UltraLight Backpacker are mosquito-proof as far as I'm
              concerned. I've never gotten bitten through them.

              After you've used your HH for a while, do try a Speer-type
              hammock. I think they're harder to set up, but easier to
              use. It's good to have different gear to use on different
              kinds of hike.

              Bear
            • Lenny Nichols
              I remove the floating top lid from my backpack and use the two straps to hang if from the line along the top of my hammock. This makes a nice storage place for
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 21, 2005
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                I remove the floating top lid from my backpack and use the two straps to hang if from the line along the top of my hammock. This makes a nice storage place for rain gear and miscellaneous smallish things that I don't want under me.

                I don't trust porcupines and other critters in the night with my packstraps and boots on the ground. I hang my pack in a tree, tie my boots together and hang them over the pack, and cover with a pack rain cover. Keeps things dry and unmolested.


                Lenny Nichols

              • Kane Mortlock
                Thanks for the replies so far everyone who has replied. Any and all tips would be appreciated particularly at this (beginning) point. Kane.
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 21, 2005
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                  Thanks for the replies so far everyone who has replied.

                  Any and all tips would be appreciated particularly at this
                  (beginning) point.

                  Kane.
                • Paul
                  Lenny, Thats always a good idea. I always hang my pack from a branch or a line around a tree instead of on the ground. I once had my favorite dry bag ruined
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 21, 2005
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                    Lenny,

                    Thats always a good idea. I always hang my pack from
                    a branch or a line around a tree instead of on the
                    ground. I once had my favorite dry bag ruined by a
                    red squirrel when I left it unattended on the ground
                    for 30 minutes in the middle of the day. I also had a
                    mountain bicycle seat destroyed when I left the bike
                    stashed on the ground in the woods for a day when I
                    went off hiking. Never again.

                    It is also a good idea to unzip any pack zippers,
                    especially in areas where the mini-bears know people
                    and backpackpacks. Better to let the critters inside
                    to explore rather than invite them to chew their way
                    to the inside to look for food. They can be very
                    smart and destructive in that way. Anyone in bear
                    country knows not to keep loose food and smellables in
                    the backpack, but rather in a separate bag that you
                    hang someplace else a short distance away from the
                    campsite - the same appies for smaller creatures as
                    well. Porcupines especially will attack anything that
                    smells of sweat or salt, including canoe paddles.

                    --- Lenny Nichols <lnichols@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I remove the floating top lid from my backpack and
                    > use the two straps to
                    > hang if from the line along the top of my hammock.
                    > This makes a nice
                    > storage place for rain gear and miscellaneous
                    > smallish things that I don't
                    > want under me.
                    >
                    > I don't trust porcupines and other critters in the
                    > night with my packstraps
                    > and boots on the ground. I hang my pack in a tree,
                    > tie my boots together
                    > and hang them over the pack, and cover with a pack
                    > rain cover. Keeps things
                    > dry and unmolested.
                    >
                    >
                    > Lenny Nichols

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                  • Dylan Anderson
                    In my case I find that there is nothing to hang once I am in camp. All my clothes I keep in a fleece bag, so iy serves as a pillow. This does double duty by
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 25, 2005
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                      In my case I find that there is nothing to hang once I
                      am in camp. All my clothes I keep in a fleece bag, so
                      iy serves as a pillow. This does double duty by
                      keeping me comfortable, as well as being totally sure
                      that my clothes are both warm and dry in the morning.
                      My water is kept in a Camelback which is attached to
                      the rain fly so I have an easy drink in the middle of
                      the night, additional water is kept outside attached
                      to the corners of the rainfly where it could catch
                      rainwater should a storm brew overnight and the fly is
                      tensioned in this way as well. My food and cooking
                      gear is always hung from another tree some place
                      removed from camp. Boots/shoes are hung from the
                      ridgeline inside at the foot end just above the
                      entrance so they are easy to get at and dry in the
                      morning. Flashlight and tissue are in the little
                      pocket on the ridgeline, and all that leaves then are
                      a few other small items like compass, first
                      aid/survival kit, etc. These are in a small stuff
                      sack that is attached to the head end knot loop.
                      Being that I use a form of Gear Skin (see
                      MoonbowGear.com), it gets laid over one end of the
                      hammock and with that I am done, nothing on the gound,
                      everything within the confines of the rainfly at
                      least, and the majority of important items are inside
                      with me where they are safe. Only the spare water and
                      food are outside as they should be.

                      Oh, and after some expirementation, I came up with a
                      solution to bottom insulation that is quick, easy, and
                      cheap for those who do not have the time or budget for
                      underquilts and such. I took a fleece sleeping bag
                      liner, and put a closed cell foam pad inside it. Just
                      one of those cheap grey sheets, and layed that inside
                      my Hennessy. When it got colder, I took my car
                      windsheild reflector too and slid it into the liner
                      underneath the pad. This has worked for me so far
                      down to approximately 30. I know it isn't all that
                      light weight (about 29 oz with the reflector), but it
                      does work, it is simple requireing no sewing, and
                      cheap since I got the foam for about $5, the liner for
                      $15, and the reflector for $3. Plus the system has
                      the added advantage of being relatively comfortable on
                      the ground, and if I needed more insulation, I could
                      take apart my pillow and add the clothes underneath
                      the pad. And since it is all contained inside the
                      sleeping bag liner, it is easy to position and get on
                      top of in a Hennessy, along with being flexable and
                      adaptable. I intend eventually to make an underquilt
                      myself, but in the mean time it is proving to be a
                      viable solution for this season.

                      =====
                      Though I may die tomorrow, at least I can do it with the knowledge that once I did know true love -unknown




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                    • chcoa
                      ... wrote: Dylan, where did you purchase your grey cc foam and what are the dimensions? jamie in az
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 25, 2005
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Dylan Anderson <hum469@y...>
                        wrote:
                        Dylan, where did you purchase your grey cc foam and what are the
                        dimensions?

                        jamie in az
                        >
                        > Oh, and after some expirementation, I came up with a
                        > solution to bottom insulation that is quick, easy, and
                        > cheap for those who do not have the time or budget for
                        > underquilts and such. I took a fleece sleeping bag
                        > liner, and put a closed cell foam pad inside it. Just
                        > one of those cheap grey sheets, and layed that inside
                        > my Hennessy.
                      • jwj32542
                        ... Could you post some pics, pls? I saw this on Tom s New Products page, but he doesn t have any pictures. Do you have some kind of filter on top of the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jan 26, 2005
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                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Dylan Anderson <hum469@y...>
                          wrote:
                          > the night, additional water is kept outside attached
                          > to the corners of the rainfly where it could catch
                          > rainwater should a storm brew overnight and the fly is
                          > tensioned in this way as well.

                          Could you post some pics, pls?

                          I saw this on Tom's "New Products" page, but he doesn't have any
                          pictures. Do you have some kind of filter on top of the bottles?
                          Not for purification, but I'd be concerned about dust/debris washing
                          down the tarp and into my drinking water. A little bit of junk in
                          there is not big deal, but a bandana over the top would be great.

                          Did you make it or is it a prototype from Tom?

                          Jeff
                        • Dylan Anderson
                          Jaime, sorry I forgot to mention, I got it from Popular, and it is made by thermarest apparently the stuff with the little teeth on the edges to attach
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jan 26, 2005
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                            Jaime, sorry I forgot to mention, I got it from
                            Popular, and it is made by thermarest apparently the
                            stuff with the little teeth on the edges to attach
                            multiple pieces together. It is 25" wide by about 60"
                            or so long (it is cut off though, so I imagine it was
                            72" origionally).

                            Jeff, mine were made from scratch because I saw the
                            idea on Tom's site. I put a coffee filter down into
                            the funnel section (I always carry filters because I
                            use them to strain water before using my Iodine tabs).
                            I don't have any pictures, but it is raining here
                            right now and I did intend to go test something else
                            in the park, so if I can get to that (And find my
                            bottles!) I will snap some shots and show you. They
                            aren't pretty, but that is ok.

                            =====
                            Though I may die tomorrow, at least I can do it with the knowledge that once I did know true love -unknown


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