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RE: Hammock Camping Newbie to the group No. 2 for the day

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  • David Chinell
    Rob: Welcome to the group. I started hammocking by taking picnic hikes. I d haul a heavy knotted-string hammock down a trail, eat my sandwich, and take a nap
    Message 1 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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      Rob:
       
      Welcome to the group. I started hammocking by taking "picnic" hikes. I'd haul a heavy knotted-string hammock down a trail, eat my sandwich, and take a nap after lunch.
       
      I guess there are advantages to a rope hammock, but once I tried a cloth hammock, I've never looked back. They seem more comfortable, there's no tangle of strings to manage or get caught on, and solid cloth hammocks can be just a light, or even lighter than some string hammocks.
       
      You can plunge in headfirst and get a complete system like a Hennessy Hammock, or start with a basic hammock and add components as your requirements and pocketbook allow. You can make everything you need with very little effort.
       
      My first cloth hammock was the Tropical Hammock by Nomad Travel. You can get them from Brigade Quartermaster on the web, and from the Nomad Travel site as well. To this I added a polytarp, and a commercial mosquito net. In other words, I  assembled my first rig from bought pieces, none of which cost over $30 by itself.
       
      Another great way to start would be to buy Ed Speer's book. It has all the details you need to build a slick hammock system for yourself, again with very little effort, skill, or expense.
       
      Above all, try your own experiments and dream up your own schemes while you're out there, swinging beneath the sky. And let us know what works for you.
       
      Bear
    • robi dawson
      hi Everybody, I, like Dave, am also new to the group. I bumped into it on the Net when looking for info on making hammocks. Any of you do that? More
      Message 2 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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        hi Everybody,

        I, like Dave, am also new to the group.

        I bumped into it on the Net when looking for info on making hammocks.

        Any of you do that? More specifically I am interested in *net* hammocks as opposed to cloth ones. However, if you all think that is a waste of time let me know.

        So, where does one sitting in Budapest Hungary - I am from Boston, but just happen to be living here for the next millennium - get started on hammocking. If I can get a nice set up made i will start using it to sleep out in and to camp in the very first chance I get.

        Thanks all!

        Rob
      • robi dawson
        Dave: Cool, thanks for swift reply! I am not very interested in buying anything already made. Numerous reasons,one being I have little to no spare money. But
        Message 3 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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          Dave:

          Cool, thanks for swift reply!

          I am not very interested in buying anything already made. Numerous reasons,one being I have little to no spare money.

          But more importantly I very much enjoy producing my own things. I have a winter hat, hand woven by my son when he was 9. To most it is extremely ugly, the colors do not match, the quality of the knitting, is well, what you would expect of a 9 year old. But it was hand made for me and I wear it with pride.

          I truly enjoy making things and using them. So I will be making my own hammock. Your mention of tangles and what not in a rope hammock has already convinced me that cloth is the way to go.

          do, other than the book by Speer, are there any other wealths of information. Possibly on line versions?

          Like anything new, terminology is a bit confusing. Forgive me all if I ask what seem like boring/basic questions. I will only do so if I am not able to figure out what sg means....

          Thank you again

          Rob Dawson


          At 10:38 AM 3/4/03 -0500, you wrote:
          Rob:
           
          Welcome to the group. I started hammocking by taking "picnic" hikes. I'd haul a heavy knotted-string hammock down a trail, eat my sandwich, and take a nap after lunch.
           
          I guess there are advantages to a rope hammock, but once I tried a cloth hammock, I've never looked back. They seem more comfortable, there's no tangle of strings to manage or get caught on, and solid cloth hammocks can be just a light, or even lighter than some string hammocks.
           
          You can plunge in headfirst and get a complete system like a Hennessy Hammock, or start with a basic hammock and add components as your requirements and pocketbook allow. You can make everything you need with very little effort.
           
          My first cloth hammock was the Tropical Hammock by Nomad Travel. You can get them from Brigade Quartermaster on the web, and from the Nomad Travel site as well. To this I added a polytarp, and a commercial mosquito net. In other words, I  assembled my first rig from bought pieces, none of which cost over $30 by itself.
           
          Another great way to start would be to buy Ed Speer's book. It has all the details you need to build a slick hammock system for yourself, again with very little effort, skill, or expense.
           
          Above all, try your own experiments and dream up your own schemes while you're out there, swinging beneath the sky. And let us know what works for you.
           
          Bear

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        • David Chinell
          Gang: I personally don t have a list of cool hammocking websites. Can somebody point out some online resources to the newbies? Bear
          Message 4 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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            Gang: I personally don't have a list of cool hammocking websites. Can somebody point out some online resources to the newbies?
             
            Bear
          • geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@yahoo.com>
            Hi dave, Take a look at this page in Hammock Wiki: http://www.flyfisher-kayaks.com/cgi-bin/hwiki.pl?Building_A_Hammock and this page too:
            Message 5 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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              Hi dave,

              Take a look at this page in Hammock Wiki:

              http://www.flyfisher-kayaks.com/cgi-bin/hwiki.pl?Building_A_Hammock

              and this page too:

              http://www.flyfisher-kayaks.com/cgi-bin/hwiki.pl?Material_Lists

              Like Bear said, the Ed Speer Book is a great resource for building
              the hammock.

              Flyfisher <><

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, robi dawson <beanco@m...>
              wrote:
              > Dave:
              >
              > Cool, thanks for swift reply!
              >
              > I am not very interested in buying anything already made. Numerous
              > reasons,one being I have little to no spare money.
              >
              > But more importantly I very much enjoy producing my own things. I
              have a
              > winter hat, hand woven by my son when he was 9. To most it is
              extremely
              > ugly, the colors do not match, the quality of the knitting, is
              well, what
              > you would expect of a 9 year old. But it was hand made for me and I
              wear it
              > with pride.
              >
              > I truly enjoy making things and using them. So I will be making my
              own
              > hammock. Your mention of tangles and what not in a rope hammock has
              already
              > convinced me that cloth is the way to go.
              >
              > do, other than the book by Speer, are there any other wealths of
              > information. Possibly on line versions?
              >
              > Like anything new, terminology is a bit confusing. Forgive me all
              if I ask
              > what seem like boring/basic questions. I will only do so if I am
              not able
              > to figure out what sg means....
              >
              > Thank you again
              >
              > Rob Dawson
              >
              >
              > At 10:38 AM 3/4/03 -0500, you wrote:
              > >Rob:
              > >
              > >Welcome to the group. I started hammocking by taking "picnic"
              hikes. I'd
              > >haul a heavy knotted-string hammock down a trail, eat my sandwich,
              and
              > >take a nap after lunch.
              > >
              > >I guess there are advantages to a rope hammock, but once I tried a
              cloth
              > >hammock, I've never looked back. They seem more comfortable,
              there's no
              > >tangle of strings to manage or get caught on, and solid cloth
              hammocks can
              > >be just a light, or even lighter than some string hammocks.
              > >
              > >You can plunge in headfirst and get a complete system like a
              Hennessy
              > >Hammock, or start with a basic hammock and add components as your
              > >requirements and pocketbook allow. You can make everything you
              need with
              > >very little effort.
              > >
              > >My first cloth hammock was the Tropical Hammock by Nomad Travel.
              You can
              > >get them from Brigade Quartermaster on the web, and from the Nomad
              Travel
              > >site as well. To this I added a polytarp, and a commercial
              mosquito net.
              > >In other words, I assembled my first rig from bought pieces, none
              of
              > >which cost over $30 by itself.
              > >
              > >Another great way to start would be to buy Ed Speer's book. It has
              all the
              > >details you need to build a slick hammock system for yourself,
              again with
              > >very little effort, skill, or expense.
              > >
              > >Above all, try your own experiments and dream up your own schemes
              while
              > >you're out there, swinging beneath the sky. And let us know what
              works for you.
              > >
              > >Bear
              > >
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              > >ADVERTISEMENT
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            • blqysmg
              ... ... I m from Georgia. I live in Holly Springs, a little town in between Woodstock and Canton. That s north of Atlanta for all those who aren t
              Message 6 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "starnescr <starnescr@y...>"
                <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                > Hi David
                >

                <snip>

                > Now if you dont mind what state are you from. Were a nosy bunch.
                >
                > Coy Boy
                >


                I'm from Georgia. I live in Holly Springs, a little town in between
                Woodstock and Canton. That's north of Atlanta for all those who
                aren't familiar with North Georgia.

                Most of my camping is in the Chattahoochee National Forest. My
                favorite spot is on the back side of Blood Mountain, just south of
                the AT. We often hike some of the forest trails that cross the AT.
                There are tons of isolated camp sites in the area. We like the Dicks
                Creek area, because we can drive to it, and once there we usually
                don't see anyone else.

                One time we camped there for 9 days, and only saw four people the
                whole time. It pays to be just a little off the beaten path.

                David
              • blqysmg <david.chamness@eds.com>
                What a great idea! I could snitch a piece of that from the cabinet. Once the pad is in place, that should keep it there. David
                Message 7 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                  What a great idea! I could snitch a piece of that from the cabinet.
                  Once the pad is in place, that should keep it there.

                  David


                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen T. Gregorie"
                  <stgga@y...> wrote:
                  > this past weekend I was 'hanging around' and my 3/4
                  > inch therm-a rest was sliding everywhere. My wife
                  > suggested getting some of the material used to keep
                  > rugs from sliping. It is a tacky mesh material. So I'm
                  > going to try that.
                  >
                  > steve
                  > --- "starnescr <starnescr@y...>"
                  > <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                  > > Hi David
                  > >
                  > > Glad you found us. Ed started the group so he
                  > > deserves most of the
                  > > credit. I can't comment on Therm-a-Rest pads but I
                  > > have found all
                  > > pads slip a little. Thin foam pads seem to work
                  > > better and the
                  > > wider pads tend to slip less. For instance my 27
                  > > inch wide 3/8 inch
                  > > thick blue foam pad slips more than my 40 inch wide
                  > > reflectix pad.
                  > > My reflectix pad is almost as wide as the hammock
                  > > body so it wraps
                  > > up on both sides pretty good. Not much way it can
                  > > slide out from
                  > > under me. I tried a 20 inch blue foam pad and it
                  > > was much harder to
                  > > stay on top of.
                  > >
                  > > Now if you dont mind what state are you from. Were
                  > > a nosy bunch.
                  > >
                  > > Coy Boy
                  > >
                  > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "blqysmg
                  > > <david.chamness@e...>" <david.chamness@e...> wrote:
                  > > > Hi, I just found this list, and thought I'd
                  > > introduce myself. I'm
                  > > > fairly new to the whole camping in a hammock
                  > > movement. I've had
                  > > > hammocks for years, and used them on the back
                  > > porch, or when
                  > > camping,
                  > > > during the day. I've always loved my hammocks.
                  > > >
                  > > > I'd never thought of camping overnight in a
                  > > hammock, though, till
                  > > I
                  > > > found info about it on the web this winter. What
                  > > a concept! I
                  > > don't
                  > > > know why I never thought of sleeping the night in
                  > > comfort before.
                  > > It
                  > > > would have made sense, I guess.
                  > > >
                  > > > The problem is, as you guys already know, staying
                  > > warm. I've read
                  > > a
                  > > > bit about the way folks are trying to keep warm in
                  > > the hammocks at
                  > > > night. I tried sleeping out two weekends ago. I
                  > > set up a tent
                  > > for
                  > > > my boys (ages 4 and 6), and the hammock for
                  > > myself.
                  > > >
                  > > > I used a big, comfy hammock that I had bought at a
                  > > boat show, of
                  > > all
                  > > > places. It is 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon, with the
                  > > cloth extending all
                  > > > the way to the ends, where hooks are attached. I
                  > > bought it
                  > > becouse
                  > > > it's the first hammock I'd ever seen that didn't
                  > > have strings to
                  > > get
                  > > > tangled up.
                  > > >
                  > > > I covered the hammock with a 8'x10' tarp, which I
                  > > tied over a
                  > > center
                  > > > rope. The tarp just reached the ground on either
                  > > side of the
                  > > > hammock. I staked it down with five stakes on the
                  > > windy side,
                  > > > because the weather channel predicted high winds.
                  > > Boy, they were
                  > > > right.
                  > > >
                  > > > The wind was fifteen to thirty, and I bet a couple
                  > > of those gusts
                  > > > were close to fifty. It rained,too, but not a
                  > > great amount. In
                  > > the
                  > > > areas north of me, I hear there were extremely
                  > > voilent storms. I
                  > > > stayed warm and dry until the wind pulled my
                  > > stakes out. It was
                  > > the
                  > > > most eventful night I've ever spent out.
                  > > >
                  > > > The sleeping pad thing has me puzzled, though. I
                  > > used a therm-a-
                  > > > rest, and a lightweight sleeping bag. Underneath,
                  > > I was almost
                  > > too
                  > > > warm. It felt strangely like I was sleeping on a
                  > > heating pad. I
                  > > > don't think the sleeping bag I used was heavy
                  > > enough for the
                  > > night,
                  > > > though. It was really a summer weight bag, only
                  > > good down to 55
                  > > > degrees. Since the temp dropped to about 40, I
                  > > had to resort to
                  > > > covering the bag with a fleese liner.
                  > > >
                  > > > The only problem I had was whenever I moved, the
                  > > darn therm-a-rest
                  > > > would turn sideways. As long as I could stay on
                  > > it, I was nice
                  > > and
                  > > > toasty, when it turned, my legs would get cold.
                  > > It was also
                  > > > asthetically displeasing to have the pad sticking
                  > > up beside me!
                  > > >
                  > > > Do the foam pads stay in place better? Are thin
                  > > pads better at
                  > > > conforming to your shape, or do you slide off of
                  > > them? Would
                  > > sewing
                  > > > or zipping a liner onto the pad help to keep it in
                  > > place?
                  > > >
                  > > > Inquiring minds want to know!
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks for contributing to this body of knowledge.
                  > > I'm really
                  > > glad I
                  > > > found you guys!
                  > > >
                  > > > David
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
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                  > Yahoo! Tax Center - forms, calculators, tips, more
                  > http://taxes.yahoo.com/
                • colonelcorn76
                  ... own ... has already ... Check out: http://www.flyfisher-kayaks.com/cgi-bin/hwiki.pl or
                  Message 8 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, robi dawson <beanco@m...>
                    wrote:

                    > I truly enjoy making things and using them. So I will be making my
                    own
                    > hammock. Your mention of tangles and what not in a rope hammock
                    has already
                    > convinced me that cloth is the way to go.
                    >
                    > do, other than the book by Speer, are there any other wealths of
                    > information. Possibly on line versions?
                    >


                    Check out: http://www.flyfisher-kayaks.com/cgi-bin/hwiki.pl

                    or
                    http://www.hammocksamerica.com/how_to_make_a_hammock/how_to_make_a_ha
                    mmock.html

                    or
                    http://www.uniqueprojects.com/projects/hammock/hammock.htm

                    or
                    http://www.shelter-systems.com/gripclips/hammock.html

                    That should get you started. ('Course the next question will be
                    where can I get "...." in this corner of the world <grin>)

                    Jim
                  • blqysmg <david.chamness@eds.com>
                    Thanks Geoflyfisher! I ll try the blue pad. I ve had the therm-a-rest forever. It s the best think I ever found for sleeping on the ground. I ve had a couple
                    Message 9 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                      Thanks Geoflyfisher!

                      I'll try the blue pad. I've had the therm-a-rest forever. It's the
                      best think I ever found for sleeping on the ground. I've had a
                      couple of the high-density foam pads, they are fine but didn't really
                      compare to the comfort of the therm-a-rest.

                      Now that I've found something for the comfort, the therm-a-rest is
                      most likely overkill. I used to have a good old army OD Green pad,
                      but I never used it. I had to give it back when I left. My therm-a-
                      rest was the same length (72") and OD Green, so I used it throughout
                      my army career.

                      The sleeping bag that I have is a mummy bag, and can't be used as a
                      quilt. It can, however, be opened at the feet as well as the head,
                      and has arm holes and a nice hood. For an all around summer bag, it
                      is really functional. I have a fleese blanket that I can take along
                      to cover me, if I need.

                      I think the Target blue pad is worthy of a try. If the weather co-
                      operates, and my wife doesn't object too much, maybe I'll give it a
                      shot this weekend.

                      David




                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "geoflyfisher
                      <geoflyfisher@y...>" <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
                      > Hi David,
                      >
                      > Welcome to the group. I have not used the thermarest in the
                      > hammock... I have one but did not choose to do experiments with it:
                      >
                      > - too heavy
                      > - notorious for slipping out from under
                      > - not long enough to be under feet and they get cold
                      >
                      > Now that you have tried the Thermarest, try a $10 experiment and
                      get
                      > the Target 27" wide pad. (Usually in Target stores nationwide) It
                      is
                      > 3/8 inch thick and 72"long. The experiment will cost you less than
                      > going out to McDonalds - they sell for between 10 and 12 bucks.
                      > Weight is about half of the lightest thermarest.
                      >
                      > You will find the pad is sort of "sticky" against the nylon hammock
                      > material and tends to stay put. It will have a few wrinkles near
                      > your waist along the sides. These can be ignored, as you do not
                      have
                      > any weight on them. I believe you will sleep much better. You can
                      > also experiment with opening your bag down to near the foot and
                      using
                      > it as a quilt instead of as a bag. The extra insulation on top of
                      > you will be appreciated and the pad will keep you warm down to the
                      > sort of temps you are talking about. The hammock sides will keep
                      the
                      > quilt on top of you. If you keep the last foot or so of the bag
                      > zipped, you can use that pocket to keep the quilt down over your
                      feet.
                      >
                      > If you do try this, let us know how the experiment works out.
                      >
                      > Rick aka Flyfisher <><
                      >
                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "blqysmg
                      > <david.chamness@e...>" <david.chamness@e...> wrote:
                      > > Hi, I just found this list, and thought I'd introduce myself.
                      I'm
                      > > fairly new to the whole camping in a hammock movement. I've had
                      > > hammocks for years, and used them on the back porch, or when
                      > camping,
                      > > during the day. I've always loved my hammocks.
                      > >
                      > > I'd never thought of camping overnight in a hammock, though, till
                      I
                      > > found info about it on the web this winter. What a concept! I
                      > don't
                      > > know why I never thought of sleeping the night in comfort
                      before.
                      > It
                      > > would have made sense, I guess.
                      > >
                      > > The problem is, as you guys already know, staying warm. I've
                      read
                      > a
                      > > bit about the way folks are trying to keep warm in the hammocks
                      at
                      > > night. I tried sleeping out two weekends ago. I set up a tent
                      for
                      > > my boys (ages 4 and 6), and the hammock for myself.
                      > >
                      > > I used a big, comfy hammock that I had bought at a boat show, of
                      > all
                      > > places. It is 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon, with the cloth extending
                      all
                      > > the way to the ends, where hooks are attached. I bought it
                      becouse
                      > > it's the first hammock I'd ever seen that didn't have strings to
                      > get
                      > > tangled up.
                      > >
                      > > I covered the hammock with a 8'x10' tarp, which I tied over a
                      > center
                      > > rope. The tarp just reached the ground on either side of the
                      > > hammock. I staked it down with five stakes on the windy side,
                      > > because the weather channel predicted high winds. Boy, they were
                      > > right.
                      > >
                      > > The wind was fifteen to thirty, and I bet a couple of those gusts
                      > > were close to fifty. It rained,too, but not a great amount. In
                      > the
                      > > areas north of me, I hear there were extremely voilent storms. I
                      > > stayed warm and dry until the wind pulled my stakes out. It was
                      > the
                      > > most eventful night I've ever spent out.
                      > >
                      > > The sleeping pad thing has me puzzled, though. I used a therm-a-
                      > > rest, and a lightweight sleeping bag. Underneath, I was almost
                      too
                      > > warm. It felt strangely like I was sleeping on a heating pad. I
                      > > don't think the sleeping bag I used was heavy enough for the
                      night,
                      > > though. It was really a summer weight bag, only good down to 55
                      > > degrees. Since the temp dropped to about 40, I had to resort to
                      > > covering the bag with a fleese liner.
                      > >
                      > > The only problem I had was whenever I moved, the darn therm-a-
                      rest
                      > > would turn sideways. As long as I could stay on it, I was nice
                      and
                      > > toasty, when it turned, my legs would get cold. It was also
                      > > asthetically displeasing to have the pad sticking up beside me!
                      > >
                      > > Do the foam pads stay in place better? Are thin pads better at
                      > > conforming to your shape, or do you slide off of them? Would
                      > sewing
                      > > or zipping a liner onto the pad help to keep it in place?
                      > >
                      > > Inquiring minds want to know!
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for contributing to this body of knowledge. I'm really
                      glad
                      > I
                      > > found you guys!
                      > >
                      > > David
                    • blqysmg
                      Thanks for the reply, Bear. I was thinking about the whole idea of the closed-cell pad (I m thinking that s what this Target Blue Pad everyone talks about
                      Message 10 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                        Thanks for the reply, Bear. I was thinking about the whole idea of
                        the closed-cell pad (I'm thinking that's what this Target Blue Pad
                        everyone talks about must be.) I never liked laying directly on my
                        Army OD Green pad, and thought that maybe a cloth sleave would make
                        some difference to the comfort level of it.

                        I'll try the Target pad bare first, then look for alternitives if
                        needed. I just saw a website (found it on this list) with an "under
                        blanket," or liner for the bottom of the hammock. That seems to make
                        the most sense, although it will be a good bit more work to put
                        together.

                        I'm thinking of trying one of my son's sleeping bags, opened up and
                        held onto the bottom of the hammock with bungee cords.

                        Between the blanket idea, and closed foam pads of some make, I'm sure
                        I can stay comfy.

                        David

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell"
                        <dchinell@m...> wrote:
                        > David:
                        >
                        > First let me compliment you on your writing skills. Your
                        > post was a pleasure to read.
                        >
                        > I've used a variety of hammocks and pads, and share your
                        > dislike of the intrusive feeling of the pad, even when it's
                        > well-behaved. Here are the things I've experienced and
                        > observed. (My apologies to the rest of the list, who have
                        > heard me say these things many times already.)
                        >
                        > You may be able to eliminate the pad entirely if you get a
                        > Pea Pod sleeping bag from Ed Speer, or if you build one
                        > yourself. This is a bag that goes around the outside of the
                        > hammock. Since the insulation below you isn't compressed, it
                        > keeps working, and you stay warm. I've taken mine down to
                        > the low 40s without a pad.
                        >
                        > Alternately, you might add a Garlington Insulator shell and
                        > suitable insulating material to your rig.
                        >
                        > My simple hammocks (Tropical Hammock from Nomad Travel, and
                        > Crazy Crib from Crazy Creek) both have two layers of fabric.
                        > I slip my closed-cell foam pads between the layers, and they
                        > do stay put. The closed-cell foam conforms better to the
                        > hammock shape than a Therm-a-Rest.
                        >
                        > Sewing a liner onto your hammock would probably work, but
                        > take care to verify the required size by experiment, rather
                        > than relying strictly on calculation.
                        >
                        > When I sleep directly on top of a pad, I use a special
                        > technique for turning. I push my fist against the pad,
                        > support part of my upper body weight on my fist, turn my
                        > torso, then lower myself back to the pad and arrange my hips
                        > and feet. This keeps the pad under me. It's almost an
                        > unconscious move by now, and I doubt I even have to wake up
                        > to do it.
                        >
                        > Finally, I can recommend the Mountain Hardwear BackCountry
                        > in any length. This is a combination pad -- part
                        > closed-cell, part open-cell. It has a fabric casing. The
                        > casing is slippery on the bottom and grabby on the top, so
                        > it tends to follow me as I move. This is more a
                        > consideration for closed hammocks like the Hennessy.
                        >
                        > This pad also has a great shape for hammocking. All the
                        > extra corners and width are already removed. I've cut the
                        > corners from all my closed-cell pads so each is completely
                        > round at both ends. This shape also seems to do well in a
                        > hammock.
                        >
                        > Hope this helps you. There are LOTS of experienced and
                        > enthusiastic hammockers on this list, and you're bound to
                        > benefit from their knowledge. I sure do.
                        >
                        > Bear
                      • blqysmg
                        Robi, I don t want to discourage you from trying your own string hammock, but there is something you might want to consider. Most good string hammocks are
                        Message 11 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                          Robi,
                          I don't want to discourage you from trying your own string hammock,
                          but there is something you might want to consider. Most good string
                          hammocks are made in the mayan style, and can use up to three miles
                          of string!

                          I've owned several, and they are a joy to behold. They aren't,
                          however, any better than a good cloth hammock. For the cloth
                          hammock, you could have one made in an hour or so if you have the
                          cloth and access to a sewing machine. The cloth usually comes in 5
                          foot wide sections, which just happens to be about perfect. Hem the
                          edges, and sew a pocket on each end like you would for a curtain,
                          except tripple sew it, and your done.

                          With rope hammocks, the trick is to build a jig for making it. You
                          need to decide how many strings you want across, and make a rack to
                          hold and organize all of those strings. Then it's just a matter of
                          weaving.

                          A good craftsman, experienced in hammock making, can build a hammock
                          by hand in less than a week. It would take me a month.

                          It's worth thinking about.

                          David


                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, robi dawson <beanco@m...>
                          wrote:
                          > hi Everybody,
                          >
                          > I, like Dave, am also new to the group.
                          >
                          > I bumped into it on the Net when looking for info on making
                          hammocks.
                          >
                          > Any of you do that? More specifically I am interested in *net*
                          hammocks as
                          > opposed to cloth ones. However, if you all think that is a waste of
                          time
                          > let me know.
                          >
                          > So, where does one sitting in Budapest Hungary - I am from Boston,
                          but just
                          > happen to be living here for the next millennium - get started on
                          > hammocking. If I can get a nice set up made i will start using it
                          to sleep
                          > out in and to camp in the very first chance I get.
                          >
                          > Thanks all!
                          >
                          > Rob
                        • J Cornelius
                          Hey Flyfisher – just wondering – do you back/side/ or stomach sleep? I’m a side sleeper and have a ¾ thermarest because I sleep almost fetal anyway –
                          Message 12 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                             Hey Flyfisher – just wondering – do you back/side/ or stomach sleep?  I’m a side sleeper and have a ¾  thermarest because I sleep almost fetal anyway – however, I am a VERY restless sleeper (though I don’t know how that works in the hammock – I could end up sleeping better than I ever have!!!) so don’t like the idea of the thermarest scattering under my restlessness.

                             

                            Jodi who’s still learning this stuff but she did get her skins yesterday and can’t WAIT to get her hammock set up – if only the weather would cooperate

                             

                          • robi dawson
                            Jim, You hit the nail on the head! Where to get this material here! I will be looking hard, trying to find some! Robi
                            Message 13 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                              Jim,

                              You hit the nail on the head!

                              Where to get this material here!

                              I will be looking hard, trying to find some!

                              Robi
                            • J Cornelius
                              Here s some decent ones http://www.treehanger.com/index.html http://www.shire.net/mormon/hammock.html http://www.hennessyhammock.com/ (naturally)
                              Message 14 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                                Here’s some decent ones

                                 

                                http://www.treehanger.com/index.html

                                http://www.shire.net/mormon/hammock.html

                                http://www.hennessyhammock.com/ (naturally)

                                http://hikinghq.net/hammock/hammock.html (another “naturally”)

                                http://www.hammockcamping.com/Newsletters/NEWS.htm (and yet another)

                                http://www.hammockcamping.com/Tips/Tips.htm (he’s good)

                                http://www.lovetheoutdoors.com/camping/Tips/hammock.htm

                                 

                                Jodi

                                 

                                Abnormality IS the normality at this locality!

                                 

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: David Chinell [mailto:dchinell@...]
                                Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 2:06 PM
                                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Hammock Camping Links?

                                 

                                Gang: I personally don't have a list of cool hammocking websites. Can somebody point out some online resources to the newbies?

                                 

                                Bear



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                              • geoflyfisher
                                Mostly side sleep, an hour on one side, an hour on the other... I don t know how soundly I will sleep in the hammock once I get used to it. In the real cold
                                Message 15 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                                  Mostly side sleep, an hour on one side, an hour on the other... I
                                  don't know how soundly I will sleep in the hammock once I get used to
                                  it. In the real cold (10 degree stuff I have been playing with) I
                                  sleep but not very soundly. I plan to continue the experiments
                                  tonight... we had a NICE 50 degree day today and it is only going
                                  down to the mid thirties... first time it has been that warm in
                                  months!

                                  Tonight's experiment will be with a wind shell and the reflectix
                                  pad. The weatherman is calling for a bunch of rain as well. I need
                                  to see if my center seam on the tarp is really waterproof.

                                  It is also a test of the ability of the homemade hammock tubes to
                                  shed water from the hammock ropes.

                                  <><

                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <dojers@c...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > Hey Flyfisher – just wondering – do you back/side/ or stomach
                                  sleep?
                                  > I'm a side sleeper and have a ¾ thermarest because I sleep almost
                                  fetal
                                  > anyway – however, I am a VERY restless sleeper (though I don't know
                                  how
                                  > that works in the hammock – I could end up sleeping better than I
                                  ever
                                  > have!!!) so don't like the idea of the thermarest scattering under
                                  my
                                  > restlessness.
                                  >
                                  > Jodi who's still learning this stuff but she did get her skins
                                  yesterday
                                  > and can't WAIT to get her hammock set up – if only the weather would
                                  > cooperate
                                • starnescr
                                  Hi again David Thats not to far from me in Northeast Al (Grant). I have a sister-in- law in Menlow just across the line and an uncle in Adairsville. You are
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Mar 4, 2003
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                                    Hi again David

                                    Thats not to far from me in Northeast Al (Grant). I have a sister-in-
                                    law in Menlow just across the line and an uncle in Adairsville. You
                                    are smart. While the masses concentrate on the AT you are finding
                                    wilderness by skirting around it. The Pinhoti is much the same way.
                                    Not to well known. Ive hiked three days and only ran into a hand
                                    full of hikers and non on Thursday the first day out. Did a stretch
                                    of the AT inside the Smokeys last Oct and despite really cool
                                    weather we ran into lots of hikers. Full shelters every nite. I
                                    enjoy meeting folks but really enjoy the solitude more.

                                    Coy Boy

                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "blqysmg"
                                    <david.chamness@e...> wrote:
                                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "starnescr
                                    <starnescr@y...>"
                                    > <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                                    > > Hi David
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > <snip>
                                    >
                                    > > Now if you dont mind what state are you from. Were a nosy bunch.
                                    > >
                                    > > Coy Boy
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > I'm from Georgia. I live in Holly Springs, a little town in
                                    between
                                    > Woodstock and Canton. That's north of Atlanta for all those who
                                    > aren't familiar with North Georgia.
                                    >
                                    > Most of my camping is in the Chattahoochee National Forest. My
                                    > favorite spot is on the back side of Blood Mountain, just south of
                                    > the AT. We often hike some of the forest trails that cross the
                                    AT.
                                    > There are tons of isolated camp sites in the area. We like the
                                    Dicks
                                    > Creek area, because we can drive to it, and once there we usually
                                    > don't see anyone else.
                                    >
                                    > One time we camped there for 9 days, and only saw four people the
                                    > whole time. It pays to be just a little off the beaten path.
                                    >
                                    > David
                                  • Stephen T. Gregorie
                                    walmart sells fleece sleeping bags for $10 could do the trick for you. ... __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Mar 5, 2003
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                                      walmart sells fleece sleeping bags for $10 could do
                                      the trick for you.
                                      --- blqysmg <david.chamness@...> wrote:
                                      > Thanks for the reply, Bear. I was thinking about
                                      > the whole idea of
                                      > the closed-cell pad (I'm thinking that's what this
                                      > Target Blue Pad
                                      > everyone talks about must be.) I never liked laying
                                      > directly on my
                                      > Army OD Green pad, and thought that maybe a cloth
                                      > sleave would make
                                      > some difference to the comfort level of it.
                                      >
                                      > I'll try the Target pad bare first, then look for
                                      > alternitives if
                                      > needed. I just saw a website (found it on this
                                      > list) with an "under
                                      > blanket," or liner for the bottom of the hammock.
                                      > That seems to make
                                      > the most sense, although it will be a good bit more
                                      > work to put
                                      > together.
                                      >
                                      > I'm thinking of trying one of my son's sleeping
                                      > bags, opened up and
                                      > held onto the bottom of the hammock with bungee
                                      > cords.
                                      >
                                      > Between the blanket idea, and closed foam pads of
                                      > some make, I'm sure
                                      > I can stay comfy.
                                      >
                                      > David
                                      >
                                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David
                                      > Chinell"
                                      > <dchinell@m...> wrote:
                                      > > David:
                                      > >
                                      > > First let me compliment you on your writing
                                      > skills. Your
                                      > > post was a pleasure to read.
                                      > >
                                      > > I've used a variety of hammocks and pads, and
                                      > share your
                                      > > dislike of the intrusive feeling of the pad, even
                                      > when it's
                                      > > well-behaved. Here are the things I've experienced
                                      > and
                                      > > observed. (My apologies to the rest of the list,
                                      > who have
                                      > > heard me say these things many times already.)
                                      > >
                                      > > You may be able to eliminate the pad entirely if
                                      > you get a
                                      > > Pea Pod sleeping bag from Ed Speer, or if you
                                      > build one
                                      > > yourself. This is a bag that goes around the
                                      > outside of the
                                      > > hammock. Since the insulation below you isn't
                                      > compressed, it
                                      > > keeps working, and you stay warm. I've taken mine
                                      > down to
                                      > > the low 40s without a pad.
                                      > >
                                      > > Alternately, you might add a Garlington Insulator
                                      > shell and
                                      > > suitable insulating material to your rig.
                                      > >
                                      > > My simple hammocks (Tropical Hammock from Nomad
                                      > Travel, and
                                      > > Crazy Crib from Crazy Creek) both have two layers
                                      > of fabric.
                                      > > I slip my closed-cell foam pads between the
                                      > layers, and they
                                      > > do stay put. The closed-cell foam conforms better
                                      > to the
                                      > > hammock shape than a Therm-a-Rest.
                                      > >
                                      > > Sewing a liner onto your hammock would probably
                                      > work, but
                                      > > take care to verify the required size by
                                      > experiment, rather
                                      > > than relying strictly on calculation.
                                      > >
                                      > > When I sleep directly on top of a pad, I use a
                                      > special
                                      > > technique for turning. I push my fist against the
                                      > pad,
                                      > > support part of my upper body weight on my fist,
                                      > turn my
                                      > > torso, then lower myself back to the pad and
                                      > arrange my hips
                                      > > and feet. This keeps the pad under me. It's almost
                                      > an
                                      > > unconscious move by now, and I doubt I even have
                                      > to wake up
                                      > > to do it.
                                      > >
                                      > > Finally, I can recommend the Mountain Hardwear
                                      > BackCountry
                                      > > in any length. This is a combination pad -- part
                                      > > closed-cell, part open-cell. It has a fabric
                                      > casing. The
                                      > > casing is slippery on the bottom and grabby on the
                                      > top, so
                                      > > it tends to follow me as I move. This is more a
                                      > > consideration for closed hammocks like the
                                      > Hennessy.
                                      > >
                                      > > This pad also has a great shape for hammocking.
                                      > All the
                                      > > extra corners and width are already removed. I've
                                      > cut the
                                      > > corners from all my closed-cell pads so each is
                                      > completely
                                      > > round at both ends. This shape also seems to do
                                      > well in a
                                      > > hammock.
                                      > >
                                      > > Hope this helps you. There are LOTS of experienced
                                      > and
                                      > > enthusiastic hammockers on this list, and you're
                                      > bound to
                                      > > benefit from their knowledge. I sure do.
                                      > >
                                      > > Bear
                                      >
                                      >


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                                    • navjohn@aol.com
                                      ... I have one, and don t recommend them. The so-called fleece is poor quality and not very warm. It might do for the middle of summer. One way to test
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Mar 5, 2003
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                                        In a message dated 3/5/03 10:00:11, stgga@... writes:

                                        >Walmart sells fleece sleeping bags for $10 could do
                                        >the trick for you.
                                        I have one, and don't recommend them. The so-called "fleece" is poor quality
                                        and not very warm. It might do for the middle of summer. One way to test
                                        for good fleece is to hold it up to the light and see how thick or thin it
                                        is. The Walmart fleece flunks.
                                        John Wilson
                                      • navjohn@aol.com
                                        ... I have one, and don t recommend them. The so-called fleece is poor quality and not very warm. It might do for the middle of summer. One way to test
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Mar 5, 2003
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          In a message dated 3/5/03 10:00:11, stgga@... writes:

                                          >Walmart sells fleece sleeping bags for $10 could do
                                          >the trick for you.
                                          I have one, and don't recommend them. The so-called "fleece" is poor quality
                                          and not very warm. It might do for the middle of summer. One way to test
                                          for good fleece is to hold it up to the light and see how thick or thin it
                                          is. The Walmart fleece flunks.
                                          John Wilson
                                        • Stephen T. Gregorie
                                          I agree no good for a sleeping bag. I think it was David who was looking for a cloth cover for a mat. As a cover they re ok. Of course,if you spend more money
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Mar 5, 2003
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            I agree no good for a sleeping bag. I think it was
                                            David who was looking for a cloth cover for a mat. As
                                            a cover they're ok. Of course,if you spend more money
                                            for better fleece that would make for a warmer nights
                                            sleep.
                                            steve
                                            --- navjohn@... wrote:
                                            >
                                            > In a message dated 3/5/03 10:00:11, stgga@...
                                            > writes:
                                            >
                                            > >Walmart sells fleece sleeping bags for $10 could do
                                            > >the trick for you.
                                            > I have one, and don't recommend them. The so-called
                                            > "fleece" is poor quality
                                            > and not very warm. It might do for the middle of
                                            > summer. One way to test
                                            > for good fleece is to hold it up to the light and
                                            > see how thick or thin it
                                            > is. The Walmart fleece flunks.
                                            > John Wilson
                                            >


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                                          • Ed Speer
                                            David I second what Coy Boy says--most common sleep pads tend to slip out from beneath the user in a hammock. . If possible avoid pads with smooth or slick
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Mar 6, 2003
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                                              Message
                                              David I second what Coy Boy says--most common sleep pads tend to slip out from beneath the user in a hammock.  . If possible avoid pads with smooth or slick surfaces--unfortunately the nylon covered self inflatables are a real problem.  Some foam pads also have a slick surface finish and should be avoided.  Fortunately some inexpensive foam pads are available, such as the Wal-Mart or Target varities mentioned frequently on this list.  In addition, several companies, including my Speer Hammocks, sell extra wide, thin 'grippy' foam pads that work well alone or in combo with other pads.  Qware also sells a similar pad. Other solutions also abound on this list. Hammp hammocking...Ed
                                               
                                               
                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: starnescr <starnescr@...> [mailto:starnescr@...]
                                              Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 1:16 AM
                                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: Hammock Camping Re: Newbie to the group

                                              Hi David

                                              Glad you found us. Ed started the group so he deserves most of the
                                              credit. I can't comment on Therm-a-Rest pads but I have found all
                                              pads slip a little.  Thin foam pads seem to work better and the
                                              wider pads tend to slip less.  For instance my 27 inch wide 3/8 inch
                                              thick blue foam pad slips more than my 40 inch wide reflectix pad. 
                                              My reflectix pad is almost as wide as the hammock body so it wraps
                                              up on both sides pretty good.  Not much way it can slide out from
                                              under me.  I tried a 20 inch blue foam pad and it was much harder to
                                              stay on top of.

                                              Now if you dont mind what state are you from.  Were a nosy bunch.

                                              Coy Boy

                                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "blqysmg
                                              <david.chamness@e...>" <david.chamness@e...> wrote:
                                              > Hi, I just found this list, and thought I'd introduce myself.  I'm
                                              > fairly new to the whole camping in a hammock movement.  I've had
                                              > hammocks for years, and used them on the back porch, or when
                                              camping,
                                              > during the day.  I've always loved my hammocks.
                                              >
                                              > I'd never thought of camping overnight in a hammock, though, till
                                              I
                                              > found info about it on the web this winter.  What a concept!  I
                                              don't
                                              > know why I never thought of sleeping the night in comfort before. 
                                              It
                                              > would have made sense, I guess.
                                              >
                                              > The problem is, as you guys already know, staying warm.  I've read
                                              a
                                              > bit about the way folks are trying to keep warm in the hammocks at
                                              > night.  I tried sleeping out two weekends ago.  I set up a tent
                                              for
                                              > my boys (ages 4 and 6), and the hammock for myself.
                                              >
                                              > I used a big, comfy hammock that I had bought at a boat show, of
                                              all
                                              > places.  It is 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon, with the cloth extending all
                                              > the way to the ends, where hooks are attached.  I bought it
                                              becouse
                                              > it's the first hammock I'd ever seen that didn't have strings to
                                              get
                                              > tangled up.
                                              >
                                              > I covered the hammock with a 8'x10' tarp, which I tied over a
                                              center
                                              > rope.  The tarp just reached the ground on either side of the
                                              > hammock.  I staked it down with five stakes on the windy side,
                                              > because the weather channel predicted high winds.  Boy, they were
                                              > right.
                                              >
                                              > The wind was fifteen to thirty, and I bet a couple of those gusts
                                              > were close to fifty.  It rained,too, but not a great amount.  In
                                              the
                                              > areas north of me, I hear there were extremely voilent storms.  I
                                              > stayed warm and dry until the wind pulled my stakes out.  It was
                                              the
                                              > most eventful night I've ever spent out.
                                              >
                                              > The sleeping pad thing has me puzzled, though.  I used a therm-a-
                                              > rest, and a lightweight sleeping bag.  Underneath, I was almost
                                              too
                                              > warm.  It felt strangely like I was sleeping on a heating pad.  I
                                              > don't think the sleeping bag I used was heavy enough for the
                                              night,
                                              > though.  It was really a summer weight bag, only good down to 55
                                              > degrees.  Since the temp dropped to about 40, I had to resort to
                                              > covering the bag with a fleese liner.
                                              >
                                              > The only problem I had was whenever I moved, the darn therm-a-rest
                                              > would turn sideways.  As long as I could stay on it, I was nice
                                              and
                                              > toasty, when it turned, my legs would get cold.  It was also
                                              > asthetically displeasing to have the pad sticking up beside me!
                                              >
                                              > Do the foam pads stay in place better?  Are thin pads better at
                                              > conforming to your shape, or do you slide off of them?  Would
                                              sewing
                                              > or zipping a liner onto the pad help to keep it in place?
                                              >
                                              > Inquiring minds want to know!
                                              >
                                              > Thanks for contributing to this body of knowledge.  I'm really
                                              glad I
                                              > found you guys!
                                              >
                                              > David



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