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Re: To Cat or not to Cat

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  • zippydooda
    It seems to me that with a rectangular tarp in an A frame shape, a catenary ridgeline would almost always help reduce the looseness at the ridgeline, even over
    Message 1 of 32 , Jan 4, 2005
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      It seems to me that with a rectangular tarp in an A frame shape, a
      catenary ridgeline would almost always help reduce the looseness at
      the ridgeline, even over a broad range of A angles. I would probably
      make a relatively large tarp, like ~11x10', and make it six-sided
      (but not equilateral, obviously). I do not envision ever wanting it
      pitched flat. The large size is so that I can put my kids' small
      tent underneath, or so that I have plenty of room to roam around
      underneath when I am by myself, or so that I can pitch it with the
      ridgeline pretty high (I'm 6'2"), and still get protection from
      blowing rain...

      Still thinking. Thanks Youngblood and Jack for the input. I have
      not cut the material yet, so any other input is definitely welcome :-)

      Bill in Houston

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
      wrote:
      > Bill,
      >
      > What you are trying to do is to keep the tarp material taut and
      this
      > is not always easy or even possible with some tarp designs by just
      > <snip>
      > tarp designs were you can pull hard enough to take out any
      looseness
      > you can get a taut tarp. With a catenary ridgeline you don't have
      to
      > pull as hard to achieve tautness because you have essentially
      removed
      > the loose fabric in the manufacturing. (Think of it as just
      > gathering up the loose material at the center of the tarp.) <snip>
      > My experience with large 8'x10' tarps (or bigger) in an A-frame
      pitch
      > is that the catenary ridgeline works better. This advantage will
      > diminish with smaller tarps or maybe even with tarps that are not
      > rectangular. A catenary ridgeline is not without tradeoffs. <snip>
    • Admin
      Well, I actually find the hanging method to be quite easy. I use rolled kraft paper for my patterns and a lightweight metal decorative chain purchased at a
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 20, 2005
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        Well, I actually find the hanging method to be quite easy. I use rolled kraft paper for my
        patterns and a lightweight metal decorative chain purchased at a home improvement
        warehouse. Instead of relying on a wall that's as long as I need for the curve, I have a 1" x
        12" x 10' board that I use to put everything on (I store it against the wall behind the couch
        in the living room so it's out of the way and out of sight when not in use). I cut the paper
        into strips 10 inches wide (the paper comes in 30" width), and use 2 spring-loaded clamps
        ($3 each) to hold the paper to the board. Then I measure the center point, how far down I
        want the curve to go, and mark where I want the chain to hang. Open one clamp slightly
        and slide one end of the chain under it. Pull the chain until it is as taut as it needs to be
        for the curve, stick it under the other clamp, and trace the line. Setup time is about 5
        minutes and drawing the curve takes another minute. It's also very easy to adjust the
        chain.

        Not knocking the templates. I just wanted to share that it can be done easily with the
        right supplies.

        -howie

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "zippydooda" <zippydooda@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Having finally done this last night, I gotta say that the templates,
        > or at least the X-Y coordinates, are the way to go. Being one who
        > did not like the template idea, I hung the fabric on the wall, spent
        > quite a while trying to get it level and straight and keep it from
        > sagging too much between the support points, and all that, and then
        > trying to dangle a rope, figuring out it was too heavy, and then
        > dangling a thread so I could mark out some points and play connect
        > the dots.
        >
        > It would have been MUCH easier to use the spreadsheet and then mark
        > out several dots, and then connect them with the ruler.
        >
        > Gravity is NOT your friend - once you get the material off the floor,
        > bad stuff starts to happen. In a fitting bit of irony, you get
        > little catenary curves between your support points that cause
        > headaches when you are trying to make your nice big cat curve.
        >
        > Now to sew along the line...
        >
        > Bill in Houston
        >
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